Storing

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Storing and Handling Fruits and Vegetables at Home : 

Storing and Handling Fruits and Vegetables at Home

Resources for Today: 

Resources for Today Storing Vegetables and Fruits at Home (Washington State University EB1326) Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables for Better Taste (Univ of California – Davis) Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (Univ of Nebraska)

Plant Biology: 

Plant Biology Fruits and vegetables come from all parts of a plant: Seeds and pods – peas, beans Bulbs - onions Stems – celery, rhubarb Leaves – leafy greens Roots & tubers – potatoes, sweet potatoes

Maturity and Quality: 

Maturity and Quality Harvest fruits and vegetables at optimum maturity for best storage. Only a few fruits ripen after harvest.

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life: 

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life Slowing respiration. Plants breathe, or respire, even after harvest. Slowing respiration generally extends shelf life. Chilling produce generally slows respiration.

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life: 

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life Limiting water loss. As plants breathe, they release water into the air – transpiration. Water that is lost through transpiration is not replaced and the produce shrivels.

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life: 

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life Preventing physiological breakdown. When fruits and vegetables are stored at a temperature that is too hot, or too cold, the tissue can be damaged.

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life: 

Storing Produce for Maximum Shelf Life Preventing disease. Most fruits and vegetables will resist disease as long as the skin is intact. Before storage, carefully inspect produce for cuts, bruises and signs of decay.

In the Garden: 

In the Garden Harvest early in the day, but after dew is gone Gently remove soil Sort produce Wash, if necessary, and dry

Chill Fresh Produce Rapidly: 

Chill Fresh Produce Rapidly Chill most harvested fruits and vegetables to slow respiration (32-40°) Harvest only what you have cooling capacity to handle Package to maintain moisture

Chill-Sensitive Crops: 

Chill-Sensitive Crops Chilling can damage some fruits and vegetables, or prevent them from ripening: Bananas, melons, pineapples, tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, potatoes, winter squash Store these crops only* at room temperature.

Ripen…then Store: 

Ripen…then Store A few crops should be ripened on the counter-top, and then stored in the refrigerator: Avocados, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums

Refrigerator Storage: 

Refrigerator Storage Store fruits and vegetables in perforated plastic bags in the produce drawers Use within a few days, or further process to retain quality

Storage Compatibility: 

Storage Compatibility ‘Beware’ of strong odors Ethylene-producing fruits can damage other produce Humidity requirements can vary

Handling Fresh Produce: 

Handling Fresh Produce Wash hands and surfaces well Rinse all produce under running water; do not use soap Scrub the surface of melons, potatoes, and thick-skinned produce items

Handling Fresh Produce: 

Handling Fresh Produce Gently rinse berries and delicate fruit Discard outer leaves of leafy greens Remove tops from radishes and carrots and stems, where appropriate

Handling Fresh Produce: 

Handling Fresh Produce Use a clean cutting board and knife Cook or discard produce that has been in contact with raw meat Refrigerate cut and peeled produce

A word about vacuum sealers…..: 

A word about vacuum sealers….. Never a substitute for other methods of preservation Must be tied to refrigeration or freezing for food that is not dried

Question time??: 

Question time??

Next Time:: 

Next Time: Jams and Jellies Tuesday, June 7 10-11 am

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