Accumulation of Knowledge

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Accumulation of Knowledge

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Accumulation of Knowledge:

Accumulation of Knowledge Dr. G C Mohanta, BE( Mech ), MSc( Engg ), MBA, PhD(Mgt) Professor Al-Qurmoshi Institute of Business Management, Hyderabad - 500005

Accumulation of Knowledge:

Accumulation of Knowledge Tacit Knowledge is accumulated at the following locations: Intellect – Mental capacity for thinking & acquiring knowledge, especially of a high or complex order Experience – Knowledge or practical wisdom gained from what one has observed, encountered, or  undergone Instinct - When we see a scorpion near our leg, we withdraw the leg automatically. This is called instinctive or automatic movement. Reason -  We collect facts, generalize, reason out from cause to effect, from effect to cause, from premises to conclusions, from propositions to proofs. Through reasoning we conclude, decide and come to final judgment

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Organizational Entities People Knowledge Location Groups Individuals Organizational Units Inter-organizational Networks Organizations Artefacts Practices Repositories Technologies Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.)

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.) We carry around a great deal of knowledge and experience in our mind. We have a great deal of experiential intelligence. This has been accumulated over many years. We use much of this knowledge freely and easily - nearly effortlessly. When we are talking, we formulate an idea in our head, translate it into words, and speak the words. When we want to use a fork to get a bite of food from a plate and transfer it to our mouth, little conscious effort is required.

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.) The problem solving can be viewed as an interaction among ‘the humans working to solve a problem’, ‘accumulated knowledge of the human race’, and ‘the problem to be solved’. Quite a bit of the accumulated knowledge needed for a particular problem may reside in the mind of the problem solver.

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.) Building on Previous Knowledge: We routinely solve many of the problems that we encounter by just using the knowledge we have accumulated throughout our lifetime. Collectively, the human race has accumulated a great deal of knowledge, far more than any one person can learn. Much of this accumulated knowledge is stored in people's heads. A great deal is stored in books, films, tapes, paintings, and other artefacts; an increasing percentage of that knowledge in present day is stored in computer systems.

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.) A computer is an excellent aid to building on the previous work of other people. Many of the problems that people want to solve can be solved by finding out how others have solved the same problem in the past, and then doing what they did. The libraries and other information sources throughout the world are being computerized and networked together. Networked Computers can be used, as accumulated knowledge, to find out the solution for a particular problem. An increasing amount of human knowledge is being stored in computer systems. Often it takes relatively little time and effort to learn to make use of this form of previously developed knowledge.

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.) Our mind "knows" a great deal of information. This can be divided into two main categories: procedural and declarative. Procedural knowledge is knowledge about how to do things. Our mind has mastered many different physical procedures for accomplishing tasks. When we were young child, we did not know how to tie our shoes. Now, we tie our shoes without conscious effort. We have mastered this skill; it is stored in our mind.

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.):

Accumulation of Knowledge (Contd.) Declarative knowledge is concerned with the facts that we know. We have memorized a great many facts or pieces of information. We know the alphabet, some telephone numbers, addresses, names of people, dates, and so on. Such declarative information is important to problem solving. The procedural and declarative knowledge are differentiated by calling the former "know how" and the latter "know what (knowledge)." Our "know how" and "know what" work together as we solve problems and accomplish tasks.

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