Plate method

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Planning Meals Using theIdaho Plate Method : 

1 Planning Meals Using theIdaho Plate Method

The Idaho Plate Method : 

2 The Idaho Plate Method

Slide 3: 

3 IPM – 7 servings/day More than 5 servings/day have half the risk of developing cancer

Vegetables : 

4 Vegetables Vegetables cover half of the plate

Vegetables : 

5 Vegetables Half of your plate Vitamins A and C Antioxidants Fiber

Cancer “Phyting” Vegetables : 

6 Cancer “Phyting” Vegetables

Versatile Vegetables : 

7 Versatile Vegetables Steamed, baked, boiled, microwaved Raw

Fresh Salad in a Bag : 

8 Fresh Salad in a Bag mizuna tatsoi arrugula lolla rosa baby green romaine tango baby red oak baby green oak red Swiss chard baby green leaf baby red leaf

Serving Size : 

9 Serving Size 1 serving ½ cup cooked1 cup raw

Bread/Starch/Grain Group : 

10 Bread/Starch/Grain Group Covers 1/4 of plate Bread Starch Grain

Bread - Servings : 

11 Bread - Servings Bagel, bread, roll (1 oz) English muffin, ½ Hamburger or hot dog bun, ½ Pita – 6 inches across Tortilla – 6 inches across Waffle – 4.5 inch square

Cereals : 

12 Cereals Choose whole grains ½ cup cooked ¾ cup cold

Whole-grain Cereals : 

13 Whole-grain Cereals Check first ingredient 3 grams of fiber No more than 3-5 grams of sugar No more than 200 milligrams of sodium Whole grains help maintain blood sugar

Pasta and Rice – ½ Cup Cooked : 

14 Pasta and Rice – ½ Cup Cooked Pasta Rice

Starchy Vegetables : 

15 Starchy Vegetables Peas Corn Potatoes

Dried Beans and Peas : 

16 Dried Beans and Peas

Fruit Group – One Serving Per Meal : 

17 Fruit Group – One Serving Per Meal

Berries – Nutrition Powerhouses : 

18 Berries – Nutrition Powerhouses

Fresh Fruit : 

19 Fresh Fruit

Canned Fruit, Fruit Juice, Dried Fruit : 

20 Canned Fruit, Fruit Juice, Dried Fruit

Meat, Protein Group : 

21 Meat, Protein Group 2-3 ounces per serving (about the size of a deck of cards) Covers 1/4 of plate

Slide 22: 

22 Chicken Roast Beef

Slide 23: 

23 Eggs Fish

Slide 24: 

24 Cheese Nuts Tofu

Meat/Protein Preparation : 

25 Meat/Protein Preparation YES Bake Broil Boil Steam Stir-fry Pan-broil NO Deep-fry Pan-fry

Meat/Protein – Name these Products : 

26 Meat/Protein – Name these Products

Dairy Group – 1 Cup : 

27 Dairy Group – 1 Cup

Dairy Group – ½ Cup : 

28 Dairy Group – ½ Cup Ice Cream Pudding

Fats/Sugars/Salt : 

29 Fats/Sugars/Salt Fats Margarine/butter Oil Salad dressing Sugar Salt OIL

Healthy Fats : 

30 Healthy Fats Polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) Vegetable oils Fish oils Monounsaturated fats (MUFA) Olive oil Canola oil Peanut oil

Unhealthy Fats : 

31 Unhealthy Fats Saturated fats Animal products Processed food—coconut andpalm oil—”tropical oils” They usually are harder at room temperature Trans fats Vegetable oil + hydrogen = margarine “partially hydrogenated” Processed foods and fast foods Shortening

Compare Fat Content : 

32 Compare Fat Content

Calculating Trans-fat Intake : 

33 Calculating Trans-fat Intake Trans-fat Total fat = (saturated fat + monounsaturated fat + polyunsaturated fat)

Calculating Trans-fat Content : 

34 Calculating Trans-fat Content Add the grams of: Saturated fat = 1.0 Polyunsaturated fat = 0.5 Monounsaturated fat = 1.5 Total = 3gm Subtract from total fat: 5gm – 3gm = 2 grams trans-fat

Heart Disease : 

35 Heart Disease Saturated fat LDL cholesterol Trans-fat LDL cholesterol HDL cholesterol Blood flow rate

Two New Margarines : 

36 Two New Margarines Take Control Benecol

Sugar Substitutes : 

37 Sugar Substitutes

Sugar Substitutes : 

38 Sugar Substitutes Acesulfame -K Aspartame Saccharin Sucralose Neotame

Slide 39: 

39 Approved in 1988, 200 times sweeter than sugar. Use in cooking—not heat sensitive Sources: sugarless gum, diet drink mixes, powdered diet sweeteners, puddings, gelatin desserts, yogurt. Pepsi One: acesulfame-K + NutraSweet Acesulfame-K

Slide 40: 

40 Approved in 1981 180 - 200X > sugar Trade name: in foods: NutraSweet as powder: Equal Made from 2 amino acids, heat sensitive In > 1500 products Adverse rxns: headaches, dizziness, seizures, nausea Aspartame (Equal, Nutrasweet)

Slide 41: 

41 Oldest sugar substitute - 1879 300 X > sugar In 2000 – saccharin was proven safe and Congress passed legislation to remove the cancer warning label on products Products: diet soft drinks, toothpaste, table-top sweeteners (e.g. Sweet ‘n Low) Saccharin

Slide 42: 

42 Splenda

Slide 43: 

43 Approved in 1997, 20 yrs of testing 600 X > sugar Regular sugar—chlorine molecules substituted for OH ---> not absorbed. Use in cooking and baking Approved for 15 food and beverage categories—in 11 categories Sucralose

Slide 44: 

44 Newest sweetener on the market–approved July 2002 Considered safe based on 113 human and animal studies. 7,000 - 13,000 times sweeter than sugar Can be used in cooking Manufactured by NutraSweet Neotame

Sodium/Salt Intake : 

45 Sodium/Salt Intake Watch your salt intake Use herbs and spices to season your food

Spice It Up! : 

46 Spice It Up!

Desserts: Use Occasionally in Place of Fruit : 

47 Desserts: Use Occasionally in Place of Fruit Small servings 1-2 times per week

Breakfast : 

48 Breakfast

Lunch/Dinner : 

49 Lunch/Dinner

Summary : 

50 Summary Plan Your Meals Pick foods from all food groups Eat 3 meals a day Eat less fat, sugar, and salt

Obviously this Child Loves to Eat! : 

51 Obviously this Child Loves to Eat! Enjoy Enjoy Enjoy

What’s Your Goal? : 

52 What’s Your Goal? Set your goal for week two Bring this sheet to class next week

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