Light Pollution an IBSE scenario

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Presentation Description

Presentation in the Discover the Cosmos Conference (Volos, Greece - 2013) about an Inquiry Based Science Education Scenario on Light Pollution. You can find the worksheets here: http://portal.discoverthecosmos.eu/en/node/195700

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Presentation Transcript

Calibri:

How many stars can I see at night? José Gonçalves www.eufisica.com astropt.org

Wingdings:

Introductory section and preparatory phase Short Description: Students in this scenario will study the effects of light pollution on the observation of the stars at night and they will simulate with Stellarium . Keywords: Astronomy, Hands-On, Stellarium , observation, pollution, light. Target audience: Students at 7 th grade Age range: 11+ years Context: After the constellations subject, this scenario will be implemented at home, and at school. Time required: 90 min (or 2 periods)

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Technical Requirements: Teacher : Computer with Stellarium and Excel Data projector and , if possible , an interactive board . Students : Computers with internet connection and Stellarium . Author’s background: Connection with the curriculum: Astronomy at 7 th grade, in Physics lessons. Learning Objectives: Verify that the artificial light affects the observation of the stars at night Guidance for preparation: Introductory section and preparatory phase

Default Design:

To provoke curiosity, teachers can do it in two ways: Presented the following timelapse video http://vimeo.com/channels/eufisicatv/24551969 2) The students must to complete the tasks presented in the Worksheet 1 at home, in a night before this class lesson. Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 1: Questions Eliciting Activities – PROVOKE CURIOSITY Timelapse author : Randy Halverson One of the tasks from Worksheet 1

How many stars can I see at night?:

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 1: Questions Eliciting Activities – DEFINE QUESTIONS FROM CURRENT KNOWLEDGE Questions from data: Do we see the same number of stars if we are in the same region? Can some students observe more stars than others ? Can any factors (human, nature) influence our observation? Is any factor more important than another?

Introductory section and preparatory phase:

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 2: Active Investigation – PROPOSE PRELIMINARY EXPLANATION OR HYPOTHESES We can’t see many stars at night sky because of: City lights (even if we are in an urban region); The pollution from industry; The clouds; The moonlight; Volcano’s activity; The atmosphere, air; The satellites (too many). International Dark-Sky Assocation. When the eastern power grid failed, from Ontario to New York City, in August 2003, it revealed something many city dwellers had never seen: from horizon to horizon, a sky full of stars. Then the power came back on.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 2: Active Investigation – PLAN AND CONDUCT SIMPLE INVESTIGATION Worksheet 1 ( at home before this class lesson ) Using stellarium “ Atmosphere ” feature to explain different observations by changing the artificial light . Turn the lights off and on and ask the students explanations . Choose  Sky and window options [F4] In the “ Atmosphere ” area, select a value for artificial light .

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 1: Questions Eliciting Activities – PROVOKE CURIOSITY:

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 3: Creation – GATHER EVIDENCE FROM OBSERVATION After the first worksheet is completed at home, the teacher will collect the data to a spreadsheet and display the graphs. Observation of the Orion’s Constellation. Source: Wikipedia

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 1: Questions Eliciting Activities – DEFINE QUESTIONS FROM CURRENT KNOWLEDGE:

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 3: Creation – GATHER EVIDENCE FROM OBSERVATION Counting the stars using STELLARIUM and interactive board.

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 2: Active Investigation – PROPOSE PRELIMINARY EXPLANATION OR HYPOTHESES:

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 3: Creation – GATHER EVIDENCE FROM OBSERVATION Observation gathered from STELLARIUM.

Pre-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 2: Active Investigation – PLAN AND CONDUCT SIMPLE INVESTIGATION:

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 4: Discussion – EXPLANATION BASED ON EVIDENCE By using Stellarium the students concluded: Atmosphere has a little influence our night sky observation; Artificial light are more influent in our night sky observation; With the increasing of artificial light the number of astronomical objects that we can see is reduced to a minimum.

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 3: Creation – GATHER EVIDENCE FROM OBSERVATION:

Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – COMMUNICATE EXPLANATION Poster created by the students with teacher’s help

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 3: Creation – GATHER EVIDENCE FROM OBSERVATION:

Worksheet 2 Causes of light pollution, by their nature (natural and anthropogenic). Two measures to reduce light pollution. Best places to make the observation of the Universe. Homework Take a look to the constellation of Orion and register it at: http://www.globeatnight.org/webapp/ (visit website to participation dates). Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 3: Creation – GATHER EVIDENCE FROM OBSERVATION:

Local places to make the observation at night. Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS Created with Google FusionTables

Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 4: Discussion – EXPLANATION BASED ON EVIDENCE:

Local places to make the observation at night. Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS Created with Google FusionTables

Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – COMMUNICATE EXPLANATION:

Reading: http://www.darksky.org/ http://www.cleveland.com/nation/index.ssf/2008/11/bigcity_light_pollution_may_go.html http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/11/light-pollution/klinkenborg-text http://www.noao.edu/education/ More activities : http://portal.discoverthecosmos.eu/en/node/191453 http://portal.discoverthecosmos.eu/en/node/191458 http://www.need-less.org.uk/ (online Sky Night simulator ) Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS:

My personal evaluation of this scenario Evaluation: Reflection

Post-Experiment / Observation– Teaching Phase 5: Reflection – FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS:

Contact Information José Gonçalves Physics teacher at the public schools in Portugal Telephone #: +351 961422488 Skype: eufisica Email: eufisica@gmail.com josegoncalves@eufisica.com

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