CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

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CONDITIONAL SENTENCES : 

CONDITIONAL SENTENCES

Present Real Conditional (type 0) : 

Present Real Conditional (type 0) If I have time, I study English.Sometimes I have time.

Situations that are always true if something happens : 

Situations that are always true if something happens Conditional 0 is formed by the use of the present simple in the if clause followed by a comma and the present simple in the result clause. You can also put the result clause first without using a comma between the clauses. If he comes to town, we have dinner.ORWe have dinner if he comes to town.

Future Real Conditional (type 1) : 

Future Real Conditional (type 1) If I have time, I will study English.If I have time, I am going to study English.I don't know if I will have time or not. Often called the "real" conditional because it is used for real - or possible situations

Present/Future Unreal Conditional (type 2) : 

Present/Future Unreal Conditional (type 2) If I had time, I would study English. I don't have time/ I won’t have time Often called the "unreal" conditional because it is used for unreal - impossible or improbable - situations.

Past Unreal Conditional (type 3) : 

Past Unreal Conditional (type 3) If I had had time, I would have studied English.I didn't have time, so I didn’t study English. Often referred to as the "past" conditional because it concerns only past situations with hypothetical results. Used to express a hypothetical result to a past given situation.

Unless… : 

Unless… In the conditional 1 we often use unless which means 'if ... not.

Even if… : 

Even if… 'even if' show a result that is unexpected based on the condition in the 'even if' clause.

In case (that), in the event (that) : 

In case (that), in the event (that) 'In case' and 'in the event' usually mean that you don't expect something to happen, but if it does... In case you need me, I'll be at Tom's. I'll be studying upstairs in the event he calls.

PROVIDED, PROVIDING, AS LONG AS : 

PROVIDED, PROVIDING, AS LONG AS We use as long as, providing/ provided to say that something will happen only on condition that something else happens. You can stay here as long as you keep quiet.

Verb to be : 

Verb to be The verb 'to be', when used in the 2nd conditional, is usually conjugated as 'were'.

Quiz 1 : 

Quiz 1 If he comes,…

If he comes,…

I would buy a new house…

I would buy a new house…

If she misses the bus,…

If she misses the bus,…

If I had known you were in town,…

If I had known you were in town,…

If he studies a lot,…

If he studies a lot,…

I would get a new job,…

I would get a new job,…

He will surely fail his exams,…

He will surely fail his exams,…

She would live in New York now,…

She would live in New York now,…

They would have bought that new car,…

They would have bought that new car,…

I leave on Satudays,…

I leave on Satudays,…

If he were president,…

If he were president,…

If they had had good sense,…

If they had had good sense,…

She will go crazy,…

She will go crazy,…

Watch out! If you touch that cable,…

Watch out! If you touch that cable,…

I might have had time,…

I might have had time,…

I’m afraid I can’t understand you…

I’m afraid I can’t understand you…

She would have gone…

She would have gone…

You would certainly have been angry…

You would certainly have been angry…

You would certainly have been angry…

We’ll have to walk …

We’ll have to walk …

If someone offered to buy you one…

If someone offered to buy you one…