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train

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Training the Trainer : 

Training the Trainer . “The true aim of education is not knowledge but ACTION” Presented by: Ebb Ryan L. Magtuba, ECE, ACB Training Engineer Engineers and Staff Training Training Centre Department

Training Objective: : 

Training Objective: At the end of the session, the participants should be able to: a. Define the complete training cycle and explain the role of training within the organization. b. Demonstrate the fundamental skills needed in becoming an effective trainer including basic speaking and training documentation. c. Exhibit sense of acceptance and sincerity in providing training service. d. Apply effective training the trainer lessons in actual training implementation.

Course Content : 

Course Content Preparing the Trainer to Communicate Understanding what is Training Preparing for Training Conducting the Training Assessment of Training

I. Preparing the Trainer to Communicate : 

I. Preparing the Trainer to Communicate Actual communication workshop Assessment on how we communicate effectively

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles Training Objectives Training Needs Analysis Overview

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Constructing Training Objectives Conceptual Framework Designing the learning Experience Training Methods Learning Environment Seating Patterns Course Timing Process Strategy Tool Method Sheet Tool Planning the Training Preparation

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Name Cards or Tags Names and Faces Icebreakers Enthusiasm Using your Voice Mannerism Lighthouse Technique Facilitating Discussions Dealing with Difficult Participants Body Language Audio – Visual Support

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Theory of Learning Evaluation Post-Course Evaluation Evaluation of knowledge or Skills Gained

Cone of Learning adapted from ( Dale, 1969) : 

Cone of Learning adapted from ( Dale, 1969)

I. Preparing the Trainer to Communicate : 

I. Preparing the Trainer to Communicate Actual Communication Workshop and Assessment For your first training delivery, you will introduce yourself to your fellow participants and give them some information about your background, interest, ambitions. Practice giving your message for at a maximum of 3-5 minutes only. Make a draft, tell your story and strive to make eye contact with some of your audience. You may use notes, during your delivery if you wish. Read the entire workshop before delivering your message.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Training is a valued and rewarding profession dedicated to helping people grow and their organizations to improve. Dimensions of trainer competency: Knowledge and experience Trainer Skills Concern and availability

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Training Needs Analysis (1) What is the desired improvement in performance? Can it be addressed by development of knowledge or skill? Or is it an issue attribute to something else: Motivation Poor physical condition unreliable equipment substandard material inappropriate methods wrong information or measurements unsafe/dirty/disorderly

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Training Needs Analysis (2) Who are the target trainees? What are their demographic characteristics and language? What is the current state of their knowledge or skill? How do we measure this? How much is the desired state from the GAP? And How do we bridge it? How many are the target trainees? If they are to be trained in batches, how many should be in each batch? Where are the target trainees? Where will they be trained?

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Training Needs Analysis (3) When are they to be trained? The time constraints and deadlines. What training resources are available trainer training materials equipment venues What to be acquired or developed internally or outsourced? How much is our training budget? Is it sufficient and reasonable?

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (1) If they want to and need to! By linking learning to past, present, or future experience By practicing what they have been taught With help and guidance In an informal and non-threatening climate With positive reinforcement along the way

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (2) The average person can think at least 6 times faster than the average trainer can talk! The average attention span is about 10 minutes without stimulation, so we must vary the media and give multi channel messages.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (3) The brain remembers what is repeated, so we must repeat, recap, and review! 5 minutes factors of recall -----FROLL First : We are more likely to remember the beginning or first in a series. Reviewed: Recall falls rapidly after 24 hours without review. Outstanding: We remember unusual things very well. Linked: Recall is high for things which are linked by mnemonics or analogy. Last: We are more likely to remember the end of events or the last in a series of events.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (4) The key to long term retention of knowledge and skills are regular reviews and frequent use!

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (5) The left side of the brain is for logical applications: speech, calculations, reading, writing, sequencing, evaluation, logic, complex motor sequences. The right side is for creative applications: imagination, creativity, emotions, images, recognition, perception of abstract patterns, spatial abilities, intuition, music, artistry.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (6) Most people use one side more than the other, and find it difficult to “switch”. When the weaker side is stimulated and encouraged to cooperate with the stronger side , there is synergy! Therefore , trainers should combine analytical exercises with creative , expressive activities to be effective.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (7) The brain stores information in multimedia VHF! Visual: pictures, images, diagrams, charts, drawings, graphs Hearing: words, sounds, music, conversations Feeling: emotions, smells, tastes, tactile experiments, pain/comfort Therefore , we must give multi – channel messages!

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (8) Mnemonics are memory devices that link together two or more pieces of information. By linking together visual hearing , and/or feeling data, they create a distinct and more memorable whole. WHAT IS FROLL & VHF ?

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (9) Five kinds of mnemonics: First letter acronym (Flac): Take the first letter of every word or phrase and create a new word. First letter phrase ( Flep ): Create a phrase where each word begins with the letter of each thing to be remembered. Sounds: Music, songs, or sound effects which will remind people of your messages when they hear them.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (10) Rhymes & Slogans: Create a memorable rhyme or slogan to “anchor” the message. Logos and Image Association ( Lima ): Create visual aids or symbols that trainees can associate the message with.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Adult Learning Principles (11) Paradigms are strongly held subconscious belief on how to perceive reality and how to solve problems within that reality. When something conflicts with their paradigms , people either reject or distort the new information so that it no longer challenges their mindset.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

Adult Learning Principles (12) To help trainees overcome the discomfort caused by cognitive dissonance, start from their point of view and show them the WIIFT ( What’s in it for them?). By concentrating on the benefit they stand to gain, we help them to justify accepting the change of mind set. II. Understanding what is Training

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Constructing Training Objectives Every course needs a set of clearly defined specific end-results that the trainees have to attain and a set of measurable or tangible indicators with which to verify them. These are summarized in the training objectives. Training objectives should focus on a few critical result areas and should be improvement – oriented.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Training Objectives Examples At the end of this course, the participants will have been able to: Set up the CNC lathe so that it can machine high carbon steel rods with a tolerance of plus and minus 0.05mm with an average daily yield of 99.9%. Operate it daily without any accident or damage. Finish machining each work piece within the standard cycle time of 30 seconds. Perform all the required daily preventive maintenance and lubrication checkups.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training The Conceptual Framework (1) The conceptual framework is a mental model of how the training objectives will be attained. The model identifies the key topics and their relationships. It is highly advisable that the conceptual framework be captured in a diagram. It is vital to the identification of topics that will be included in the course.

Conceptual Framework (2) example : 

Conceptual Framework (2) example S T A N D A R D S Introduction to the machine Set-up procedures & checklist Safety precautions checklist Operational monitoring & product inspection Preventive maintenance checklist Quality & Yield Safety Fast Cycle time And cost Autonomous Maintenance Feedback & Improvement

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training Design a course based on your organizations /department /section’s training needs that you know. Have a clear idea of the target participants. Choose an appropriate title and course description. Formulate the specific course objectives. Design the conceptual framework and identify the key topics.

II. Understanding what is Training : 

II. Understanding what is Training PRE TEST IS A MUST… Just to make the participant realize that they need to learn. DESIRED ACTUAL GAP

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Designing the learning Experience (1) Always start with a learning “hook” or attention –getter. Establish the GAP between participant’s present knowledge/skills and those to be acquired during the course. Check that participants understand the existence and size of the knowledge/skills gap. Establish the need to close the gap.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Designing the learning Experience (2) Ask and answer questions to check participants’ individual needs. Outline course coverage, stressing results to be achieved ( during and after the course ) inclosing the knowledge / skills gap. Explain each new learning / skills in small digestible chunks using Visual, Hearing , and feeling support.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Designing the learning Experience (3) Demonstrate skills and/or show how knowledge applies to them. Allow participants to exercise each new skills or to feedback their understanding of new knowledge. Show participants how well they have learned and correct any inadequacies.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Designing the learning Experience (4) Review all learning points at end of each module. Use VHF support. Agree on an action plan for the transfer of new knowledge or skills to real life. Agree on any follow up or refresher. Always finish with a succinct and provocative summary of the learning experience.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (1) LECTURE Probably the most common method. The trainer directly imparts information's to the trainees, often using visual aids. Effective when the trainer possesses a high degree of expertise. Can be boring. No interpersonal interaction among trainees, only with the trainer.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (2) Case Method Trainees are given a case, a scenario of a real situation requiring analysis and decision-making Very good for developing analytical and problem solving skills. Offer guided questions. Can be done in groups. Requires more time. Very difficult if class size is too large (>25). Demands high level of facilitation skills on the part of the trainer , especially integration.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (3) Workshop Trainees are organized into small groups and given a specific task to accomplish. Highly effective for knowledge acquisition and retention and developing teamwork. Requires plenty of time. Very difficult if class size is too large (>25) Demands high level of facilitation skills on the part of the trainer.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (4) Games Trainees are organized into small groups. Rules of the game are explained, and each group tries to win. Makes training fun, with high, retention of knowledge. Creates competition and develops teamwork. Very difficult if class size is too large ( >25) Demands high level of facilitation skills on the part of the trainer especially in processing the results.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (5) Films A video film is shown, followed by facilitated discussion (either by the class as a whole or by small groups. Requires stimulating guide questions for discussions. Demands high level of facilitation skills on the part of the trainer, particularly in integrating insights in each group.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (6) Role – playing or simulation Trainees are placed in a realistic situation and instructed to act as they normally would. Very good for attitude change, knowledge retention, and interpersonal skill. Highly effective when combined with video recording. Requires much time Very difficult if class size is too large ( >25) Demands high level of facilitation skills on the part of the trainer.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Training Methods (7) Programmed Instruction Trainees interact with software or use a programmed workbook. Software test their progress and lets them proceed to a higher level only if they have successfully passed the previous one. Learning at one’s own pace. Very high knowledge retention but no interpersonal interaction. Requires high self-discipline.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training The Learning Environment (1) The ideal environmental checklist Reliable and appropriate audio-visual equipment Appropriate seating pattern Comfortable chairs Tables with good writing surface Comfortable temperature Minimum 500 lux lighting

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training The Learning Environment (2) ADDITIONAL No distracting noises At least 3 sqm space per participant Reliable electrical power and convenient switches and outlets With whiteboard and supplies With walls that can support flipchart paper Clean, no leaks Supply of coffee, tea, water & light snacks if there’s budget

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Seating Patterns (1) U – shape Businesslike/formal Good visibility Non-threatening Front participants at 60-90 degrees head angle Rear participants far from screen/flipcharts

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Seating Patterns (2) V- shape Best pattern for visibility Optimum trainer / participant contact Less formal than “U” Inappropriate

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Seating Patterns (3) Herring Bone Space effective for large group Good visibility Reminiscent of school Rear participants far from screen, and flip chart Relatively poor trainer & participant contact

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Seating Patterns (4) Bistro Ideal for team building sessions and workshops Informal, encourages maximum participation May foster lack of attention and encourage side conversations Encourages splinter groups

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Seating Patterns (5) Circle Ideal for sensitivity training sessions Encourages maximum involvement Excellent trainer-participant contact Difficult to find tables which can be set up

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Seating Patterns (6) Amphitheatre Excellent visibility & acoustics acoustics if room is well designed Very space effective Good for lecture – type presentations Very poor trainer participant contact Very university like

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Psychology of Seating Patterns Distance reduces participation e.g. trainees in back rows are less likely to participate. Any kind of “row” reduces interaction. Changes in seating patterns from one session to another can be upsetting. At repetitive sessions, participants will likely sit in the same place. Angry/cynical participants will move away from a group seating pattern.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Varying the Media The learning environment should provide a change of pace, medium, subject, or method every 10 minutes to avoid “auto shut-off”. Plan seminar coverage so that new stimuli come at fairly regular 10 minute interval. Plan for regular discussion periods, small group works, or “stretch breaks”. Voice control and humor can help change the pace.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Course Timing (1) In a 9 hour training day (0830-1730) allow downtime. Latecomers, setting, administrative = 15 minutes Coffee breaks = 20 + 20 = 40 min. ( even you planned for 30 minutes) Lunch and resettling after = 75 min. ( even if you planned for 60) Stretch breaks, breaking into groups = 25 minutes Total = 2 hrs. 30 minutes

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Course Timing (2) Always keep a clock or watch on your desk. Use a stopwatch or timer for timing exercises, break-out sessions, etc. Always allow time for discussion. Build it into your course plan.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Process Strategy Sheet (1) A Process Strategy Sheet is a document that contains the objective of each topic in the contents and how it relates to the over all course objectives, the methodology of delivery for each topic, the rationale behind such method, and key results or indicators of success. It is vital to the documentation of the course design.

Process Strategy Sheet (2) : 

Process Strategy Sheet (2) CourseTitle:________________ III. Preparing for Training

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Workshop Draft the process strategy sheet for your new course. The topics should be in proper chronological sequence as they are to be delivered in the course. Make sure that all topics can be linked to one or more course objective. Make sure that all the course objectives have at least one supporting topics. Note that it is possible to use more than one method for the same topic.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Method Sheet (1) A Method Sheet is a document that guides the trainer on what to say, show, or do at each stage or topic of course. It is analogous to a script used by actors and directors. It identifies the activities, length of time, learning points, the materials and equipment to be used, and the seating pattern.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Method Sheet (2) A method Sheet is a set of course procedural standards for each major topic to ensure that the course delivery will be consistent even with different trainers. It is again vital for course documentation and standardization, particularly for courses that are to be given repeated by various trainers.

Method Sheet (3) : 

Method Sheet (3) Topic:________________ III. Preparing for Training

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Review and Recap The more channels used, the better the understanding desire of the participants. Set-up a measurable success indicators in relation to the course objectives. Objectives must have topics and they must linked. If not you may consider to evaluate and delete the topic. DOCUMENTATION IS VITAL ! a. Predictable results b. Consistency of the training program c. Other trainer could RUN the program d. Could create a checklist

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Draft a method sheet for each topic in your process strategy sheet. Make sure all activities are accounted for , and that they are in the proper chronological sequence.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Planning the Training (1) Why are we training? What are the training objectives? What can be accomplished in the available time? At what intellectual level? With what audio-visual aids? Who are attending : age, nationality, level, language ability, prior experience, expectations, mind set?

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Planning the Training (2) When is the training to be held? Period of the year? Weekdays or weekends? Morning, afternoon, or evening? Is this timing good for everyone? Where is it be held: building, room, layout, seating patterns, environment, possibility of interruptions?

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Preparation (1) Get enough REST just before the session. Keep your energy at high level Always carry a hard copy of the Process Strategy and Method Sheets. A soft copy stored in the nearest PC available. Summarize all requirements (materials, handouts, supplies, equipment, seating pattern, food and beverage arrangements) in a CHECKLIST.

III. Preparing for Training : 

III. Preparing for Training Preparation (2) Arrive at the venue at least 45 minutes before the start of the session to set-up. Test all equipments thoroughly. Take at least 15 minutes to review your materials and prepare yourself physically and mentally. If a participants list and profile is already available, review it to note how the approach can be fine-tuned.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Name Cards or Tags Make sure that each participants has a “tent card” for his/her name. Lettering should be BIG and BOLD. Alternatively, name tags with big enough lettering may be used. This is done to make it easier for the trainer and co-participants to remember a participant’s name more easily (ice-breaking).

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Names and Faces Listen to name Spell it in your head Repeat it as often as possible Look for an outstanding facial feature Exaggerate and associate

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Icebreakers Always start with an ice breaker or inclusion activity. Trainees arrive with a loose mix of mind sets. An inclusion activity will make them feel included and help them relate to the others ad to the course.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Enthusiasm Enthusiasm is contagious! So is the lack of it. Consciously use your eyes and face to communicate enthusiasm. Always keep a sparkle in your voice. Fight boredom by using new anecdote Help them relate to other participants and to the course. E.g. JOKES, changing the lesson structure.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Using your Voice Speak louder than usual Don’t swallow words. Beware of verbal “tics” Vary tone & pitch (mood). Check unfamiliar words. Accentuate syllables. Repeat key phrases with different vocal emphasis. Fast delivery = excite/stimulate Slow delivery = emphasize Projection Articulation Modulation Pronunciation Enunciation Repetition Speed

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Mannerism Be aware of your unconsciously repeated actions. e.g. scratching your head, putting hands in pockets, pacing the stage. Eliminate verbal tics ( uhm, ahh, err, okay okay okay, you know….) Watch out for furniture. Avoid “ closed” tense body positions. Check your hair and clothes before standing. Don’t wear distracting clothes!!!

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Lighthouse Technique Sweep the audience with your eyes, staying only 2-3 seconds on each person, unless in dialogue. REASON This will give each participant the impression that you are talking to him / her personally and ensure attention.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Questioning Skills Close question – only one correct answer, or answerable by “yes” or “no.” Open question – Many possible answers About – How do you feel about… Reflective – You don’t feel comfortable with… Hypothetical – What would happen if…. Framing – Help me to see how this fits with… Statement – You look as if you want to say….

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Reflect/Deflect Reflect back to the questioner what you think is the question asked you. Deflect: Group – How do the rest of you feel? Have you ever been in the same situation? Ricochet – (to one participant) You’re the expert on this. What do you think? Reverse – (back to the questioner) What is your view?

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Active Listening When a participant reacts negatively or become upset, never attempt to counter, argue, defend or take sides. Keep calm. Reflect back to the participant (in the form of questions) what feelings you heard being expressed. Lead the participant to specify the exact problem and to find a solution.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Keeping a Group Discussion Going Building Build an incomplete answers by adding own comments and asking for a reactions. Boosting Support timid participants contributions and boost confidence. Blocking Interrupt dominant/aggressive ones by asking what other think. Bantering Establish non – threatening atmosphere by engaging in a friendly talk.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Brainstorming Ask Ask open-ended, provocative questions. Record Write all ideas on a flip chart; don’t evaluate until the end. Trigger Use wild ideas and humor to trigger ideas. Encourage hitch-hiking on others ideas. Summarize Summarize and /or regroup ideas. Help group to evaluate.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Socratic Direction Know the answer you want. Use open questioning technique to lead the participants to the same conclusion. Paraphrase their answer. Summarize contribution on flip chart. Add your own points.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Teaching Tempo(1) Two factors govern the pace of teaching. The participants level of knowledge and general intelligence Low-slow High-fast Your own teaching style Snappy, authoritarian, directive = fast Relaxed, informal, facilitative = slow

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Facilitating Discussion: Teaching Tempo(2) How to change tempo: Slower – use more cases, examples, anecdotes, exercise. Speak slower. Ask open question. Faster – Speak faster. Use more directive tone. Cut down discussions Asked closed questions. Vary your tempo. Be sensitive to the reactions of your participants.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Dealing with Difficult Participants (1) The Heckler- probably insecure, gets satisfaction from needling, aggressive and argumentative. What to do - Never get upset. Find merit, express agreement, and move on. Wait for a mis-statement of fact and throw it to the group for correction.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Dealing with Difficult Participants (2) The Talker/ Know it all – a show-off, well-informed and eager to show it. What to do – Wait till he/she takes a breath, give thanks, refocus, move on. Slow down with a tough question. Jump in and ask group to comment.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Dealing with Difficult Participants (3) The Griper – feels aggrieved. Probably has a “pet peeve” will use you as scapegoat. What to Do - Get him/her to be specific. Show that the purpose of your presentation is to be positive and constructive. Use peer pressure.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Dealing with Difficult Participants (4) The Whisperers – possibly don’t understand what’s going on, or sharing anecdotes, or bored. What to do - Stop talking, wait for them to look up, and non-verbally ask for permission to continue. Use lighthouse technique.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Dealing with Difficult Participants (5) The Silent one – timid, insecure, shy; bored or indifferent. What to do : Timid: Ask easy question; boost ego in discussing answer. Bored: Ask tough questions. Use as helper in exercises.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Body Language: Types Postures and gestures How do you use hand gestures? stance? Eye contact How’s your “lighthouse”? Orientation How do you position yourself in a class? Looks/Appearance Are looks/appearance OK? Expressions of emotion Are you using facial expressions to express emotion?

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Flipcharts (1) Lightly pencil in headings in advance when unsure of space, drawing, layout, etc. Use the top corner to pencil in your notes for each chart. No one will notice! Prepare key charts in advance and put tabs or cut corners for easy access. Give each flip a title.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Flipcharts (2) Use thick markers with dark ink. Text should be visible from 10 meters. Use bullet points. Don’t write sentences! Use charts, drawings, diagrams, cartoons to make flips interesting. Have masking tape ready to stick flipcharts to the wall without damaging it.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Whiteboards Replaces blackboard; is cleaner and more professional looking. Multiple colors possible with appropriate pens. Can use 3M Post-it notes to create group-work summaries. Disadvantage: contents cannot be stored.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Computers & LCD Projectors (1) Computer-generated presentations using software like PowerPoint or Lotus Smart Suite are becoming more popular. Colorful, professional, with multimedia animation and sound effects possible, pre determined sequence of visuals. Technically subject to Murphy’s Law!

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Computers & LCD Projectors (2) In preparing your presentation file, remember that the sound and special effects should enhance not distract from, the principal message. Use a dark background for on-screen presentations, especially if the room cannot be totally darkened.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Computers & LCD Projectors (3) Be sure to use a software version that is compatible with that in the computer to be used for the presentation. If in doubt, save a file in an earlier version. Always bring a back up presentation file in a separate storage device. Keep the storage device away from magnets, heat and direct sunlight.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio – Visual Support: Tips for Videos, VCDs, and DVDs Have a clear purpose of using them. Decide whether to use the entire recording or portions only; if the latter, select carefully. Reinforce with open discussion or small group activity after.

IV. Conducting the Training : 

IV. Conducting the Training Audio-Visual Support: Photographic Slides The biggest advantage is the high quality of the image resolution. The biggest disadvantages are high cost, the need to darken the room, the lost of contact with and participation of the audience. Slides should be used only when they are clearly the most cost – effective alternative.

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (1) It is good idea to get feedback directly from the participants on how successfully the course was conducted. Evaluation should focus on: The course design, content and delivery Were the course objectives relevant to the participants? Were they clearly explained? Were the topics covered relevant? Were they complete. Were they complete. Were they up-to date?

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (2) Were the methodologies of delivery effective and interesting? Did they encourage participation?. Were the objective all accomplished? If yes, to what extent? If no, which ones were deficient and why?. What in the course needs to be reinforced? What needs to be either improved or removed?

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (3) The trainer or Facilitator Was the trainer or facilitator effective in imparting knowledge or skills, according to the course objectives. Did he/she encourage wide participation? Was he/she competent on the subject? Were his/her communication skills effective? Did he/she manage time effectively?

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (4) The materials Were the handouts and other materials complete? Consistent with the presentations. easily readable? .Did everyone receive a full set? Were the materials professionally done? Were they properly labeled and organized?

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (5) The equipment Were the equipment used appropriate for the purpose? Did they work reliably? Were they effective in contributing to the successful attainment of the course objectives?

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (6) The venue and seating Were the venue and the seating pattern conductive to learning? Were the tables and seats, lighting, noise level, and temperature comfortable? Was the venue cleaned before and after each session? Were there adequate provisions for water, snacks, coffee/tea/beverages?

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Post-Course Evaluation (7) The support and staff Were the support and staff (if any) courteous and helpful to the participants? Were the support services satisfactory? Were all requests from participants attended to? All feedback thus generated should be reviewed for opportunities for continuous improvement.

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Evaluation of knowledge or Skills Gained (1) Ultimately, the acid test of effectiveness of a training course is the extent to which the participants are able to improve their job performance by adapting or using in their work what they learned from the course. This can only be determined after enough time has elapsed after the course. Skills take time to develop.

V. Assessment of Training : 

V. Assessment of Training Evaluation of knowledge or Skills Gained (2) This evaluation has to be a collaborative effort involving the trainer, the participant, and the participants superior. The time frame, the measurable indicators of performance improvement, and how they will be measured should be agreed before hand among the three.

Reminder (training completion requirement) : 

Reminder (training completion requirement) Apply the concepts learned in this training specifically in Course Outline Designing, Process Strategy, Process Method Designing. Submit to emagtuba@tsdp.toshiba.co.jp the result in excel application on or before __________________. Copy furnished your respective supervisor and manager.

Cone of Learning adapted from ( Dale, 1969) : 

Cone of Learning adapted from ( Dale, 1969)

6 Principles in Adult Learning : 

6 Principles in Adult Learning 1. Adult learner is self directed and prefers to make his own decision to learn e.g. what, when, where to learn. 2. Adult learner is ready to lean when he experiences the NEED to learn. 3. Adult acquires learning in relation to past experiences. 4. Adult Learner want to see a direct application on what is learned. 5. Adult learner does not have a simple right or wrong solutions to problem. 6. Adult learning is learner controlled, child learning is teacher controlled.

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