Compound and complex sentences jc

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By: carlabcross (46 month(s) ago)

Slide 9 contains an error." Michael likes his job and works hard" is not a compound sentence. It has a compound predicate. It cannot qualify as a compound sentence because there are not two independent clauses. "Michael likes his job" is an independent clause; however, "works hard" is not.

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A sentence is… : 

A sentence is… A sentence is a complete thought. One sentence is one thought or idea. A sentence is one ‘unit’ of thought that should be complete in sense and structure. A sentence should be written with the correct punctuation marks and word order. Click here! home page

Each sentence should start with a capital letter and end with: : 

Each sentence should start with a capital letter and end with: a full stop . a question mark ? an exclamation mark ! Different types of sentence: a statement is a sentence that ends in a full stop an exclamation is a sentence that ends with an exclamation mark (to show feeling) a question is a sentence that begins with a questioning word and ends in a question mark. Click here home page

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1: SIMPLE SENTENCES Seamus is asleep. Seamus likes warmth. Old Seamus used to be fun. Old Seamus is positively knackered. Seamus smells rather badly.

For a sentence to be complete it should have a subject and a verb. : 

For a sentence to be complete it should have a subject and a verb. A verb is a ‘doing’ or ‘being’ word, for example: Tom is happy. Tom rides his bicycle. I am happy. is, rides and am are the verbs. Sheila cooks tea. Jamil likes beer. Angela loves Roy. Activity: type the verb from each sentence into each box and then ask your tutor to check your work. home page Revision on complete sentences - checklist

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1: SIMPLE SENTENCES Statements: The beach is beautiful. The sea is calm. Questions: Where are we? Why is the sea calm? Commands – use the imperative: Go to the beach. Buy me a choc-ice.

Simple sentences : 

Simple sentences Here are another example of using simple sentences: My name is Anna. I am thirty years old. I come from Ghana. I like to dance. Come up with some simple sentences in your group. home page

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So are simple sentences always short …? Seamus is asleep. Old smelly Seamus used to be soundly asleep on the old fur rug.

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2: COMPOUND SENTENCES Essential ingredients: Simple sentences joined by the conjunctions And But Or

Conjunctions for writing compound sentences : 

Conjunctions for writing compound sentences Example: Michael likes his work. (simple sentence) Michael works hard. (simple sentence) Michael likes his job and works hard. (compound sentence) A compound sentence is made up of two simple sentences joined together. They are joined using the co-ordinate conjunctions: and, but, so, for, nor, yet, so home page Activity on compound sentences

More on conjunctionssubordinate conjunctions : 

More on conjunctionssubordinate conjunctions These conjunctions explain why: because as since Question: Why are you so happy today? Answer: I am happy because the sun is shining! Answer: As it’s my birthday today, I’m buying a new car! Answer: Since it’s my birthday, I’m going to the salon. home page More on conjunctions

More on conjunctionssubordinate conjunctions : 

More on conjunctionssubordinate conjunctions These conjunctions are to do with time ( when): after, when and since. Question: Are you doing anything nice this evening? Answer: When I have done all of my work, I will go to the cinema. After I have finished my work, I will go running. home page Writing complex sentences

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In the English language, a compound sentence is composed of at least two independent clauses, but no dependent clauses. The clauses are joined by a conjunction (with or without a comma), or a semicolon with no conjunction.

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He finally bought the book, or so I thought. The two independent clauses are joined by a comma and the conjunction "or". Either he goes or I go. The compound sentence is held together by the conjunction "either…or". Mary understands math; she has studied it for years. Here the two are joined by a semicolon with no conjunction.

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Compound sentences in context ... Create longer sentences Coordinate ideas (equal weighting) Can become repetitive Can sound colloquial, conversational Are great for personal writing, stories, information texts … … But must be used with care

Complex sentences : 

Complex sentences A complex sentence is usually made up of an independent clause (that would make sense on its own) joined by one or more dependent clauses (could not be a sentence on their own). He left the office early (independent), bought a paper (dependent) and had a leisurely lunch (dependent clause). The meaning of these sentences is shown by the relationship between the dependent clause and the independent clause (often shown by the use of a subordinating conjunction). Since I came back from my holiday, I have had a horrible cold. home page Writing complex sentences Conjunctions for complex sentences

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When I saw what you had done, I was happy. Independent clause: I was happy. Dependent clause: When I saw what you had done

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COMPLEX SENTENCES The sea bass, which was filmed two days ago, cruises slowly through the ocean.

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The sea bass, which was filmed two days ago, cruises slowly through the ocean. SUBORDINATION 3: COMPLEX SENTENCES SUBORDINATE CLAUSE

Slide 19: 

The sea bass, which was filmed two days ago, cruises slowly through the ocean. SUBORDINATION 3: COMPLEX SENTENCES MAIN CLAUSE

Decide whether these are simple, compound or complex : 

Decide whether these are simple, compound or complex I was scared, but I didn't run away. Compound He finally read the book that I gave him. Complex because that I gave him is a dependent clause. The girl ran into her bedroom. Simple

Comma splicing : 

Comma splicing Where two simple sentences are joined with a comma. John went to the shop, he had run out of milk.

There are 3 ways to fix this… : 

There are 3 ways to fix this…

Create two simple sentences : 

Create two simple sentences John went to the shop. He had run out of milk.

Use a conjunction : 

Use a conjunction John went to the shop because he had run out of milk. John went to the shop as he had run out of milk. John went to the shop since he had run out of milk.

Use a semi-colon : 

Use a semi-colon John went to the shop; he had run out of milk.