AmiCode e-Newsletter_Sept 2017_Amity Law School Noida

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it is the first edition of the bimonthly newsletter published by Amity University Uttar Pradesh .

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1 1 AmiCode AmiCode/September 2017/Volume 01/Issue 01 Amity Law School Noida

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2 2 Co - PATRONS Prof.Dr. Balvinder Shukla Vice Chancellor Amity University Uttar Pradesh PATRON Dr. Atul Chauhan Chancellor Amity University Editor-in-Chief Prof.Dr. Aditya Tomer Additional Director Amity Law School Noida Amity University Uttar Pradesh Editor Ms. Lekha Rani Singh Assistant Professor Amity Law School Noida Amity University Uttar Pradesh Student Editorial Team: Ms. Akansha Srivastava Mr. Khajit Thukral Ms. Mansi Dhaka Student Technical Support: Mr. Dhananjai Singh Rana Ms. Avni Agarwal Articles/Views/Book Reviews/Poems/ Interviews/Short Stories: Email id: lrsinghamity.edu Contact Address: I 3 Block Second Floor Room No. 203 CHIEF PATRON Dr. Ashok K.Chauhan Founder President Amity University Dr. D.K. Bandyopadhyay Chief Adviser FPO Amity Group Chairman-Amity Law School Amity University Uttar Pradesh Student Reporters: Ms. Kajal Sharma Ms.Sonal Gupta Ms. Jasmine Chauhan Student Photographer: Mr.Raghav Goyal Mr.Apoorv Pandey

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3 3 Message from the desk of the Vice Chancellor AmiCode Law e-Newsletter aims to serve as a platform of expressions for the law students and legal professionals. AmiCode aims to facilitate the students to use their knowledge and writing skills in the field of law. Law plays a very significant role in our lives as it serves as norm of conduct for the citizens of the society. It is must for a peaceful and problem-free society. Our society would not be able to function efficiently without laws. It’s very important to have a system of law in order to regulate a society. Law ensures that the human rights are respected and it is essential to safeguard our fu- ture generations. We at Amity University believe in the overall development of our students and provide them quality platforms to nurture their talent. The vision of Hon’ble Founder President is to create ambassadors of learning and values and that is exactly we are aiming at through various academic and associated activities. Amity University aspires to make each law student a successful lawyer and enable them to fulfill their dreams and to bring out the best in them. Each aspect related to law shall be discussed in AmiCode. The purpose is to support each learner in establishing a strong foundation of law. This bimonthly e-Newsletter shall be sharing the best of ex- pert advice for a successful career in Law. I congratulate Amity Law School Noida for initiating AmiCode e-Newsletter of Law which has the essence of Amity’s foundation: Competence Commitment and Self -Motivation. Best wishes and blessings to team AmiCode faculty members students research- ers legal professionals and career experts. Prof. Dr. Balvinder Shukla Vice Chancellor Amity University Uttar Pradesh Professor - Entrepreneurship Leadership

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4 4 Chairman’s Note: We at Amity University envision a bright future for our stu- dents in the field of law by creating successful lawyers of all times. Following the vision of our dynamic Hon’ble Founder President we nurture talent. Students as well as the Faculty Members need to enhance their reading and writing skills regu- larly. As a student of Law each student is required to learn the multi-dimensional skill sets. Newsletter is the true face of any academic institution serv- ing many purposes such as capturing what we have been doing monitoring the outcome of activities showcasing the creation and dissemination of knowledge etc. I congratulate Amity Law School Noida and team AmiCode for coming up with this e-Newsletter. I am sure that with the ac- tive participation of ALSN students and Faculty AmiCode team will add new dimensions to learning. Dr. D.K. Bandyopadhyay Chief Adviser FPO Amity Group Chairman - Amity Law Schools

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5 5 From the Editor-in Chief’s Desk: Let us walk together towards exploring the law. We at Amity University aim to make each law student a successful lawyer and enable them to fulfill their dreams. We at AmiCode shall provide the students a platform to bring out the best in them. We also aim to take AmiCode to the next level of success and allow students to enhance and use their knowledge and writing skills in the field of law. AmiCode will share the expert advices bimonthly and it’s one such initiative taken to shape the young law minds acumen. In this age of information AmiCode is initiated to establish a strong and shared foundation of ‘Law.’ “Amity Law” becomes AmiCode and this bimonthly e- Newsletter is presenting itself as a platform of learning and sharing. Each issue of AmiCode shall bring advice from career experts and will provide an opportunity to the students to present their observations writings research and legal aid initiatives. Prof. Dr. Aditya Tomer Additional Director Amity Law School Noida From the Editor’s Desk: A good researcher can never be a bad lawyer. AmiCode Law e-Newsletter aims at provide a platform to law students and legal professionals to express their views. As an Amitian I am sure that all our students will join this mission of self-growth and self-enhancement in the field of law. Through this bimonthly e-Newsletter we shall be sharing the best of expert advice for a successful career in Law. Each aspect which relates to law shall be discussed in AmiCode. The motive is to assist each learner in establishing a strong foundation of law. We hope that AmiCode shall serve as a platform of expressions. Ms. Lekha Rani Singh Assistant Professor Amity Law School Noida

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6 6 Mr. Kumar Saurabh RGSOIPL IIT KHARAGPUR USE OF DRONES UNDER INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW Technology has become part and parcel of our life and its presence has already been proved in the different field rather it can be said that in the 21 st century it is impossible to survive without technology. Ammunition used by different forces 3 decades back were not well equipped with technological aspects. New ammunitions equipped with advanced technology has replaced them. Whenever technology comes into existence rules and regulations of different jurisdictions as well as different conventions comes into picture automatically. When it comes to the drones equipped with the technology of artificial intelligence big data internet of things etc. several conventions deals with the warfare situation as well as transboundary laws plays an important role. International humanitarian law is a set of rules to limit the effect of armed conflict for humanitarian reasons. The Interna- tional humanitarian law basically protects the persons who are not or no longer participating in the hostilities and restrict the means and methods of warfare. It is also known as the law of armed conflict or the law of war. The legal framework of internation- al humanitarian law is contained in the Four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and further supplemented by Additional protocols of 1977 which is related to the protection of victims of armed conflicts. principle of unnecessary sufferings. The ultimate aim of all these principles is to comply with the definition of the IHL means to protect the person no longer taking part in the hostilities. In no situation civilian should be attacked and protection of civilian along with those not taking part in any hostilities should be in the priorities during the drone attack. The term “targeted killing “plays an important role in the case of drone. Because so many instances have been recorded when civilians along with militants are killed when attack take place by using the drones as the survey conducted by The Bureau Of Investigative Journalism clearly indicates that civilians are becoming the victim of a drone attack. . For example in the Year 2015 235 strikes were reported out of which reported killings were 1410 and total civilians who died were 65. Drones are being used in warfare since a long time but as the time passes it is also becoming difficult to inculcate these changes into the old conven- tions as well as the jurisdiction of different states. As already mentioned while targeting combatants civilians are also being killed which arises the problem of tackling such situations. Basically there are two types of armed conflict under IHL i.e. International and non-international armed conflict. There are few principles of IHL which need to comply with when the drones are used as an ammunition i.e. the principle of distinction the prin- ciple of proportionality the principle of military necessity and the There are few point related to the liability in the case of the killing of civilians due to drone attack who is responsible who will be held liable if the machine designed to act autonomously does not absolve those who give orders for the mission whom to target and when to target and the most important problem is that the provisions of international law is very dynamic to inculcate these changes. To comply with the technology and the unmanned vehicle i.e. drones artificial intelligence is widely used in the drones but still there is a doubt is the law applicable to a natural person can be applied on the drone when ci- vilians are killed due to the attack.

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7 7 Ms. Samridhi Neelam Nain BA H-Philosophy Ramanujan College University of Delhi THE WALL Before you there was me I was in the stones and hills Then I came and protected your families privacy Now I’m famous in that GoT series fantasy But that’s not me Let me tell you what is I’m the mute spectator and defender But I can’t stay silent as a grave While your savagery is being engraved This is me speaking out and no I’m not being brave I’m letting you know what hides in all your caves. I saw you when you used to live in the cave Never gave yourself a shave killed and raved Now you have changed A lot of “progress” you have gained Now you shave But there’s this inheritance you still have The killings remained same and sometimes you still rave It’s a shame You treat life as a game And yet you call yourself humans While the only human thing about you is those ovaries and semen I can understand when you hunt others down Kill animals with the help of and also turning into hounds

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8 8 Ms. Saumya Snehal BBALLBH Chanakya National Law University Patna HOW WHATSAPP AND FACEBOOK COMPROMISE OUR PRIV ACY Two students one from an engineering background and the other a law student Karmanya Singh Sateen and Shreya Seth filed an application in the Delhi High Court on the issue that WhatsApp had changed its privacy policy and had made an announcement that it would be sharing data with Facebook and alleging that this amounted as a violation of the user policy. The Delhi High Court took heed of the matter and ruled that WhatsApp would have to delete user information of all users who opted to delete their account and that it couldn’t share information unto September 25 th 2016 which was the date of the order. The said ruling was challenged in the Supreme Court. The major issue was ONLINE PRIV ACY ROLE OF THE ST ATE AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION IN THIS REGARD. Advocate Harish Salve appearing for the Petitioners contended that “It is also the responsibility of the State to guarantee and ensure the protection of the personal and private data and information of these millions of citizens when they use such modes of communication to engage in conversations and exchange private and confidential data and information”. This issue assumes greater importance today as a result of the increase in the internet users in view of the recent changes in the telecom sector. As this change and transition to internet-based application and services is quite nascent there is absence of a statutory/ regulatory framework/ mechanism in place in order to ensure that these services comply with the scheme of regulations envisaged for other such telecommunication services- including the protective services thereof.

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9 9 Ms.Akriti Arora COURSE: B.B.A. LL.B.H Amity Law School Noida Amity University Noida GOODS AND SERVICE TAX LAW AND AN OVERVIEW WITH REFERENCE TO OTHER NATIONS Tax Laws in India where government assess upon property value transactions estates of the deceased licenses granting a right and/or income and duties on imports from foreign countries. It includes all contributions imposed by the government upon individuals for the service of the state. The earlier system of indirect taxation had multiplicity of taxes levied by the Centre and State which has led to a complex and conflicting principles in indirect tax structure adding to the multiple compliance and administrative costs. There was no uniformity in tax rates and structure across States. There was cascading of taxes due to ‘tax on tax’. There were too many restrictions on seamless credit available i.e. credit of excise duty and service tax paid at the stage of manufacture was not available to the traders while paying the State level sales tax or VAT and vice-versa. Further no credit of State taxes paid in one State could be availed in other States. CST GOODS AND SERVICE TAX LAW AND AN OVERVIEW WITH REFERENCE TO OTHER NATIONS Tax Law in India where government assess upon property value transactions estates of the deceased licenses granting a right and/or income and duties on imports from foreign countries. It includes all contributions imposed by the government upon individuals for the service of the state. The earlier system of indirect taxation had multiplicity of taxes levied by the Centre and State which has led to a complex and conflicting principles in indirect tax structure adding to the multiple compliance and administrative costs. There was no uniformity in tax rates and structure across States. There was cascading of taxes due to ‘tax on tax’. There were to many restrictions on seamless credit available i.e. credit of excise duty and service tax paid at the stage of manufacture was not available to the traders while paying the State level sales tax or VAT and vice-versa. Further no credit of State taxes paid in one State could be availed in other States. CST Goods and Service Tax which subsumes a large number of Central and State taxes into a single tax is meant to mitigate the cascading effect of taxes provide near seamless credit and make way for a common market. However realization of all the foregoing objectives appears to be a Herculean task and requires the co-operation of all States. Goods Services Tax Law in India is a comprehensive multi- stage destination-based tax that will be levied on every value addition. Goods and Service Tax which subsumes a large number of Central and State taxes into a single tax is meant to mitigate the cascading effect of taxes provide near seamless credit and make way for a common market. However realization of all the foregoing objectives appears to be a Herculean task and requires the co-operation of all States. Goods Services Tax Law in India is a comprehensive multi- stage destination-based tax that will be levied on every value addition. To understand this we need to understand the concepts under this definition. Let us start with the term ‘Multi-stage’. Now there are multiple steps an item goes through from manufacture or production to the final sale. Buying of raw materials is the first stage. The second stage is production or manufacture. Then there is the warehousing of materials. Next comes the sale of the product to the retailer. And in the final stage the retailer sells you – the end consumer – the product completing its life cycle. So if we had to look at a pictorial description of the various stages it would look like: Goods and Services Tax will be levied on each of these stages which make it a multi-stage tax. ` Why GST law is necessary for India • GDP Growth will go Up by about 1 -2 after the new law stabilizes 2018-19 • International Competitiveness will increase by about 5 • Increased Foreign Direct Investments due to improve ease of doing business and serious reform measures. • Common Market- Tax distortions due to differential tax structures and entry tax impositions. Further check post delays would not be there. • Lower transaction cost multiples returns on different events at different rates in different States. • Reduced corruption due to use of information technology less interaction and less Discretion

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10 10 Ms.Simran Agarwal Amity School of Economics Amity University Noida The Punishment The punishment was announced And the culprits were asked to die But was that enough to Answer a girl’s cry. Life sentence for them made Everyone happy and contented But the girl who bared all that Still lamented. Those devils tore her apart Left her bleeding Paying no attention to any of her pleading. She was beaten torn left to die To give you the punishment No human will ever dare. Its time to break all your spell They killed her dreams just For their hunger to satisfy. It took four years for the people To claim it as a crime Now God is waiting to meet you up there May you all burn in the fire of HELL… God will never forgive you Just wait for your time. Ms. Deeksha Kumar Amity School of Economics Amity University Noida Right to Education The Constitution Eighty-sixth Amendment Act 2002 I inserted Article 21-A in the Constitution of India to provide free and compulsory education of all children in the age group of six to fourteen years as a Fundamental Right in such a manner as the State may by law determine. "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." By Nelson Mandela. Each childs brain is deeper than the sea Everyone differs in their alluring expedient Enlightenment to dawn the life of a child To revoke the darkness of a benevolent life. A way in an illiterate brain to heal AIDS Habitude to bring nations economy to the peak A way that could bring child labour to an end Antecedent never happened before that makes Ignited minds which lustrous like sun. Government who provides with a treasure of education To the destitute and poverty stricken The childhood of these children yore They also succeed to embellish. Wise education which inspires to enchant a virtue Education which is beyond a measure It can give a country back its tranquillity.

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11 11 Mr. Nishkarsh Garg B.Com.LLB H Amity Law School Noida Amity University Noida CAPITAL PUNISHMENT Capital punishment also dubbed the "death penalty" According to Hugo A. Bedau the writer of “The Death Penalty in America” capital punish- ment is the lawful infliction of the death penalty. The death penalty has been used since ancient times for a variety of offenses. The Bible says that death should be done to anyone who commits murder larceny rapes and burglary. It appears that public debate on the death penalty has changed over the years and is still changing but there are still some out there who are for the death penalty and will continue to believe that it’s a good punishment. I always hear a lot of people say “an eye for an eye.” Most people feel strongly that if a criminal took the life of another theirs should be taken away as well and I don’t see how the death penalty could deter anyone from committing crimes if your going to do the crime then at that moment your not thinking about being on death role. I don’t think they should be put to death they should just sit in a cell for the rest of their life and think about how they destroy other families. A change in views and attitudes about the death penalty are likely attributed to results from social science research. Whereas the act of carrying out the sentence is known as an execution. Crime that are punishable by death are known as capital crimes or capital offences and they commonly include offences such as murder treason espionage war crimes crimes against humanity and genocide. Capital Punishment has been around since Eighteenth century B.C. King Hammurabi made 25 different crimes punishable by death. Capital punishment moved to America in 1608 A.D. when captain Kendall was executed. The death penalty had most changes during 18 th century. Professor of Jurisprudence and Public Policy Fordham University. Excerpts from " The Ultimate Punishment: A Defense" Harvard Law Review Association 1986 “Execution of those who have committed heinous murders may deter only one murder per year. If it does it seems quite warranted. It is also the only fitting retribution for murder I can think of.” Secondly A just society requires the death penalty for the taking of a life. When someone takes a life the balance of justice is disturbed. Unless that balance is restored society succumbs to a rule of violence. penalty is applied offenders deserve the worst punishment under our system of law and that is the death penalty. Any lesser punishment would undermine the value society places on protecting lives. LATEST DEVELOPMENTS We recorded a 37 decrease in the number of executions carried out globally in 2016 as against the previous year. At least 1032 people were exe- cuted – 602 fewer than in 2015 when the organization recorded the highest number of executions in a single year since 1989.2 Despite the threshold of “most serious crimes” As it is only normal there are a lot of debates for and against the capital punishment. First argument in support of The death penalty is it prevents future murders. Society has always used punishment to discourage would-be criminals from unlawful action. Since society has the highest interest in preventing murder it should use the strongest punishment available to deter murder and that is the death penalty. If murderers are sentenced to death and executed potential murderers will think twice before killing for fear of losing their own life. Moreover even if some studies regarding deterrence are inconclusive that is only because the death penalty is rarely used and takes years before an execution is actually carried out. Punishments which are swift and sure are the best deterrent. The fact that some states or countries which do not use the death penalty have lower murder rates than jurisdictions which do is not evi- dence of the failure of deterrence. States with high murder rates would have even higher rates if they did not use the death penalty. Only the taking of the murderers life restores the balance and allows society to show convincingly that murder is an intolerable crime which will be punished in kind. Retribution has its basis in religious values which have historically maintained that it is proper to take an "eye for an eye" and a life for a life. Although the victim and the victims family cannot be restored to the status which preceded the murder at least an execution brings closure to the murderers crime and closure to the ordeal for the victims family and ensures that the murderer will create no more victims. For the most cruel and heinous crimes the ones for which the death penalty. In view of the above discussions we can see that India’s thinking on the capital punishment is still quite muddled up. It is not just a de- bate of legality and constitutionality of the death penalty but also the moral and social aspects that are related to this controversial topic that have lead to extensive confusion in this respect. Keeping away the question of law the question of death penalty has to take into considera- tions factors such as public sentiments on one hand and tussle with the moral issue of the “eye for an eye” principle on the other. Also it is known to us that error in making judgements is only humane and sometimes giving someone a second chance is like giving them a bullet again because they missed you the first time. In the end I would like to end with two suitable quotes which would give the readers two divi- sive aspects of death penalty to mull over. The first is one by Bernard Shaw an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics: “Criminals do not die by the hands of the law. They die by the hands of other men. Assassination on the scaffold is the worst form of assassination because there it is invested with the approval of the society …..Murder and capital punishment are not opposites that cancel one another but similar that breed their kind. ” And the second one is by Margaret Thatcher Prime Minister of the UK 1979 -1990 : “ If we execute murderers and there is in fact no deterrent effect we have killed a bunch of murderers. If we fail to execute murderers and doing so would in fact have deterred other murders we have allowed the killing of innocent victims. I would much rather risk the former. This to me is not a tough call…..All over the country news stories bemoan and hype the countdown to exe- cution number 1000 but where are the stories regarding the ripple effect of the heinous crimes that these murderers were executed for committing ” Maybe there is no real right or wrong answer to the issue of capital punishment or maybe if there is the society in our country need to develop to a level where the answer becomes clear to us. Until then what is required is a careful examination of facts and evidence by the judiciary in every such sensitive case to avoid any possibility of error. Also India lacks an authentic statistical database of the number of convicts being sentenced to death and executed in relation with various other factors which would give us a clearer picture of what needs to be done ahead.

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12 12 Mr. Nikhil Annand B.Com.LLB H Amity Law School Noida Amity University Noida REDUCTION OF CRIMES THROUGH LEGALIZATION OF ABORTION Minors from poor sections of the society are constantly being pushed into the world of crime. According to the police sources the share of crimes committed by minors to the total crimes has increased not only in the cities but in the country as a whole. The crimes committed by minors were 1.7 of the total crimes in the country in 2005 .It increased to 1.9 and 2 in 2006 and 2007 respectively. The primary reasons are attributed to inadequacy in juvenile care. Medical termination of pregnancy was legalized in India in 1971. It is legal up to 20 weeks of pregnancy according to the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act 1971. MTP is legal only under certain circumstances. The circumstances may be risk to the pregnant woman. Injury to the mental or physical health of the mother. Risk to the child pre – detected abnormalities in the fetus. A rape survivor can have abortion up to 24 weeks of pregnancy which exceeds the time limit prescribed by Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act 1971 i.e. 20 weeks. An adult woman requires no one’s consent to undergo abortion. Purpose: This paper focuses on how crime rates can be reduced by legalizing abortion. Research Methodology: Donohue-Levitt Hypothesis : Steven Levitt’s work ‘Freakonomics’ describes how legalization of abortion has an effect on crime rates. According to this hypothesis children who are unwanted and have no one to look after them are more likely to commit crimes. Abortion was legalized in many parts of the States after Roe v Wade and crime rates started to drop after 12 years of that starting 1992. European Law : Fetus is regarded as a part of mother under European law and hence the rights of the fetus are held by the mother. Right to life does not extend to fetuses. Findings and Interpretation : After the legalization of abortion in some parts of The States crime rates declined between 1985 and 1997 in those parts. Reduction in crime rates was more in those states which had legalized abortion. There were lower arrest rates after the legalization of abortion. Evidences from Canada and Australia also support the Donohue – Levitt hypothesis. Research Implication : A fetus can’t be considered as a ‘person’ and hence mother’s rights should be considered over fetal rights. Legalization of abortion indeed reduces juvenile crime rate. Novelty : Fetus is entirely dependent on the mother for its survival. It’s a myth that fetus starts to feel pain after 20 weeks. Fetus does not feel pain until at least 24 weeks of pregnancy. This backs up the fact that fetus is in fact NOT a person. Keywords : Crime reduction Donohue-Levitt hypothesis European law fetal rights MTP.

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13 13 Mr. Sagar Khanna Law Graduate Amity Law School Noida Amity University Noida The use of drugs in modern India has rapidly increased over a decade. The drugs which are used by the sportspersons are now used in abundance to en- hance their performance. In sports terminology use of performance enhancing drugs is known as ‘doping’. ‘Doping’ is the deliberate or inadvertent use of a substance or method by sportsperson banned by the medical commission of international Olympic committee/world anti-doping agency WADA. This is perhaps one of the most serious issues plaguing the field of sports law today. Mostly there are five kinds of drugs which are banned from taking like stimulants anabolic steroids diuretics and blood doping specialists. Besides many test from where the doping can be detected it can still be altered in many ways. There are huge number of cases where a person might alter his urine with another person or take some medicines to alter the blood oxygen level at the time when the test is taking place. Doping is the most recent difficulty to hit the Indian games. Indian competitors are typically from poorer foundations and might not have had entry to training and accordingly depend totally on their mentors and supporting staff for ensuring they dont devour disallowed substances. Subsequently various times they unconsciously take precluded substances as dietary supplements. In any case aim is of no hugeness in a doping case and therefore they confront suspensions and stripping-of decorations. When the regulatory authorities ask question to these players they simply say that ‘coach has given these substances to take’. Since they all are from poor background so they could not able to establish that they have taken these substances unknowingly and does not have any intention to cheat in the sport. This scenario has been going on from ages and according to the recent survey India stood second in terms of banned play- ers after Russia. The basic structure of the Sports in India is not developed as compared to other nation this is the reason for continuous low graded performance at the world stage. In 2016 Olympics India only bagged two medals in a country which has population over 1.2 Billion. Another important issue concerning doping is related to minors. Article 1.2.2 of the amended code states that ‘minors are deemed to accept ad abide by these anti-doping rules by virtue of their participation in sports’. An important question which needs to be ascertained here is how such an obligation arises With the context related to India there are still some loopholes regarding the dope test for minors. The National Anti-Doping Code 2009 does not have any ruling regarding the procedure for the dope test for minors. This clause in the Doping Code should be brought to the notice of the athletes in India and more so in case of minors. But since the minor’s ability to enter into contract is limited in India under the applicable laws such participation should Ideally take place only with the written consent of the guardian. Art 5.7 of the Old Code stated that testing may be conducted on minors where a person with legal responsibility for the minor has a prior consent. Therefore a lacuna exists wherein by mere participation a minor is deemed to consent to abide by the rule of dope testing due to the creation of an im- plied contract ad capacity for the actual testing.. Thus Art 1.2.2 of the amended code needs to be further amended to bring it in conformity with the legal position applicable to minors in India . The Indian Sports Federation is lacking and not putting any stress on this issue. There are many rulings by the supreme court of United States about the minor’s dope test but there is none given by the NADA. There must be school level dope testing for the student’s athlete. One must play fair and there should be a level playing field. The sanctions which has been given under different cases are justified in every aspect like Maria Sharapova and Lance Armstrong. The awareness among the players related to Doping must be present and there should be a regulating authority from bottom to top level. There is a need to have a clear knowledge about the banned substances and the notification for these banned substances should be conveyed properly to the different institution. We need to eradicate drugs from sports to make a same level of ground for all. To make a drug free sporting world all the nations must join hands to cure this heinous disease and try to aware people and provide basic amenities to the sports persons so that they should not think about taking performance enhancing substances. This study gives a strong message to the athletes to say ‘NO TO DRUGS’. Doping :Darwism of Drugs in Sports

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14 14 Ms. Meenu Sharma Lecturer Amity Law School Noida Amity University Noida JUDICIAL REMEDIES FOR ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION Remedies play very important role in the field of Environment law. Any law without remedies is castle in the air. The remedies available in India for environmental pollution comprise of statutory as well as common law remedies. .The common law is force in India under Article 372 of the Constitution of India. Common Law Remedies against the Environment pollution are available under the law of Torts. Tort is a civil wrong other than breach of trust or contract. Any Tortious act results in damage to property persons or reputation of another person and the affected party can claim damages compensation or injunction or both. The Liability of the environment polluter under the law of torts is one of the major and oldest legal remedies to abate the pollution. Majority of Pollution cases in tort under the following five categories: Nuisance Trespass Negligence Strict Liability Absolute liability Nuisance- The Roots of Environment law can be found in the Common law Concept of Nuisance. The Definition of Pollution under the Water Act goes to show that Contamination of water can be said to be pollution when it may or is likely to create a nuisance. Nuisance means anything which annoys hurts or that which is offensive. The term ‘Nuisance’ is derived from the French Word ‘nuire’ to do hurt or to annoy.  It may be in the form of obnoxious smells noise fumes air or water pollution due to the effluents discharge or it may be any kind of obstruction with interferes with the right of the person to which he is otherwise entitled for exclusive use. The common law concept is that nuisance is concerned with un- lawful interference with a person’s use or enjoyment of land or some right over or in connection with it. Nuisance can be divided into two categories: Public Nuisance Private Nuisance Public Nuisance- Public Nuisance denotes an interference with a right common to the general public. A public Nuisance is defines in Section 268 of the Indian Penal Code as follows: “A Person is guilty of a public nuisance who does any act or is guilty of an illegal omission which causes any common injury danger or annoyance to the public or to the people in general who dwell or occupy property in the vicinity or or which must necessarily cause injury obstruction danger or annoy- ance to persons who may have occasion to use any public right.” Private Nuisance-private nuisance is interference with the use of land. According to Winfield ‘it is the using or authorizing the use of one’s property or of anything under one’s control so as to injuriously affect an owner or occupier of property by physically injuring his property or by interfering materially with his health comfort or convenience.’ Trespass- Trespass means intentional or negligent direct interference with personal or proprietary rights without lawful excuse. Negligence- if there is a duty to take care but care is not taken and result in some harm to another person then it can be said that there was negli- gence. It is founded on the principle of fault. Moreover it has to be proved that the persons guilty of negligence has not taken due care which he was required to take under the law. Strict liability- the rule of strict liability is of considerable utility in cases of environmental pollution especially in those cases where the harm is caused by leakage of hazardous substances. Remedies under the law of torts Damages- Damages refer to pecuniary for tortious act substantial damages are paid compensate for the injury or loss caused due to some tortious act. Injunction- Injunction is a judicial remedy which can play important role in abating or preventing pollution. An injunction may be defined as a judicial process whereby a persons who has infringed or is about to infringe the rights of another is restrained from pursuing such acts.

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15 15 Avni Agarwal in a candid conversaton with Mr. Sooraj Dewan Founder of Legal Educaton Awareness Foundaton LEAF Mr. Sooraj Dewan a 3rd year law student of Amity Law School Delhi is not only the CEO of LEAF but also a trained Kathak Dancer and a theatre artist. He has interned under various prominent lawyers like Advocate Aishwarya Bhati AOR Hon’ble Supreme Court of India The Chambers Mr. Dilip Kumar Tirkey Member of Rajya Sabha Corporate Legal Department of National Thermal Power Corporation and many more. Q: What motivated you to pursue LawA: I don’t come from a family of lawyers. By 2020 I’d be the first-generation lawyer in my family. As obvious I had plans for engineering but life had other plans for me. The very idea of pursuing law came up post my 10 th standard end-term examinations. Having scored a 10 CGPA in 10 th I was 100 sure of taking up Science. But All thanks to my mom who came up with the idea of pursuing law. When I analyzed future career perspectives of Law I was immediately attracted. I eventually realized that I could handle dynamic subjects but not the theoretical ones. Being on the safer side I chose Commerce and side by side started taking coaching for Law entrance exam. The more I got into the roots of this subject the more I explored. And soon after my perspectives changed and law became my passion. I found law as one of the most satisfying and noble profession and hence I landed up being a law student in Amity Law School Delhi. Q: Tell us about your journey so far in Amity Delhi A I joined Amity Law School Delhi in 2015. My journey here so far has been wonderful and enriching. Though there’s a lot more to learn here which I hope I’ll be able to learn by the end of my final year. Initially I felt as if I was just put in the middle of some 1000 people for the next five years. But eventu- ally friends became family teachers became mentors and law school became my life. The aura and environment of Amity University is full of exposures and opportunities. I consider myself lucky enough that I could grab the opportunities provided by the college be it related to academics of co-curricular. Q: How did LEAF originate A. In my first semester of law school itself. I realized that there’s a huge gap between the law makers and the people which needed to be bridged. I saw the ever-rising instances of violations of law by adults juveniles etc. as a result of unawareness and nothing else. By the end of my 2 nd semester I bought LEAF into existence. Bringing an entire organization into existence right from the scratch was never easy. I was lucky enough to have a strong and enriched peer group which always stood by my side and having a good team along is always a blessing. Within 2 months of getting the registration done LEAF had started working on ground. We at LEAF believe that unawareness lies deep inside every citizen of the country. The simple ideology is that if there ’s a sane man who knows something is wrong and what the consequences could be there are chances he may never do that. Ambit of legal education and aware- ness needs to be broadened in the country since it seems a need of the hour. The Indian judiciary is already overburdened with cases and that burden can be released when there are less disputes which can only come true if people are adequately aware. With this objective LEAF was started and is working towards building a legally aware India. Q: Share with us the important skills which you gained from your internships A: Thinking out of the box refining my leadership qualities and working in a team are some skills I owe to my internships with Advocate Mr. V.P. Singh and Advocate on Record Mrs. Aishwarya Bhatti. I’m planning to have my upcoming internship under Hon’ble Justice D.Y. Chandrachud Supreme Court of India so that being a law student I get to understand the nuances of law and the society it prevails in. My most tedious yet interesting ‘internship’ which I consider as a lifelong one has been with LEAF and it will continue. LEAF has helped me gain some useful skills. I’ve been transformed into an IT guy a creative content-cum-legal writer an author a graphic designer and a lot more all by LEAF. We at LEAF also undertake interns on rolling ba- sis to introduce them to the organization and channelize their energies in the right direction. We welcome fresher who have no concrete prior experience of dealing with the law per say because LEAF is an organization which requires interns possessing a perfect blend of socio-legal analytics which is of- ten found in fresher. Q: How do you manage your studies along with running a huge organization like LEAF A. I’d say efficient time management is the key. I came across circumstances where I was not able to cope up with my studies or at times LEAF was left at stake. The first two months were an absolute mess. But with time I learnt to manage well and started putting in specified number of hours to LEAF my academics co-curricular and misc. activities. There came instances when I would fall short on my attendance and hence had to attend remedial classes rigor- ously to compensate my attendance. I’m lucky to have an understanding and cooperative mother an awesome team and learned mentors who helped getting things slowly and gradually back on track. I prefer going with the flow. Q: A majority of our countrys population is still unaware of their rights how do you think LEAF can solve this problem A: You are right Agni I’d say 60 citizens of our country are unaware about their basic rights and duties. The problem is more prominent in rural areas where people are still tied to the orthodox mentalities and irrelevant stereotypes. I don’t say it’s their fault. People in general don’t want to encounter law and want it to remain only to the courts and law colleges. They fail to realize that they live in a society which is governed by the rule of law and trying to avoid an encounter with it is almost impossible. With an aim of spreading legal education and awareness to all parts of the society beyond any social and economic barriers LEAF was started. Our first awareness camp-cum-workshop was in a village near Delhi called Katewara on rights of senior citizens. Eventually we targeted the grass-root level of our society Children and we began conducting awareness camps for school students on relevant issues such as RTE Juvenile Laws Consumer Rights Cyber Laws etc. throughout the country. To approach law students and guide their energies in the right direction we’ve been undertaking workshops and seminars at various law colleges as well. Recently LEAF has released its internal publication “SADHAK” which highlights the thoughts of law students and young professionals on recent socio-legal issues. Bridging the gap of unawareness isn’t a one day job. With a be- lieve of having an aware India somewhere soon in future we’re working. Even Rome was not built in a day. Here we are trying to rebuild an entire nation. It’ll take time but sooner or later we’ll achieve what we’ve been striving for. Q: What are your plans for LEAF in the next five years A: Legal education and awareness isn’t something which can be achieved absolutely. After we establish the realm of awareness in India we plan to tar- get the international fronts. Our aim today is serving the society and it’ll be the same after 5 years. Be it within India or abroad in any manner possible and required spreading legal education and awareness shall be our goal. Q: What would be your best advice to our young readers A: I’m sure most of the readers here are law students who’ve just started exploring this amazing field of law. They must make sure that law has hap- pened to them by choice and not by chance. Majority of our country lies in a state of unawareness leading to exploitation of the oppressed by the dominants. LEAF is just a small attempt to initiate a big chance in the lives of those unaware people. But the role of our young readers in this society is immense and incomparable. They are the ones who can enlighten the countrymen and direct them the right path. I just advise my young readers to always give their best. Mr. Sooraj Dewan Founder of Legal Education Awareness Foundation LEAF

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16 16 A Glimpse of the Independence Day Celebration Amity Law School Noida celebrated Independence Day week from 8th to 12th August 2017.Amity Law School Noida organized an Essay writing competition on the topic “Can Youth Decide Indias Destiny”. There was an overwhelming response by the budding lawyers of Amity Law School. Debate Competition Amity Law School Noida organized a Debate Competition where the participants had a brain storming session and they got an opportunity to display their speaking skills. Essay Writing Competition

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17 17 Poetry Competition Amity Law School Noida celebrated the ‘Independence Day’ Week. A poetry competition was organized and the students participated enthusiastically and presented self-composed po- ems. Independence Day Celebration Cultural Event The Cultural event had dance performances soulful music and a heart touching Role Play. Cultural Team of Amity Law School Noida along with the participants of cultural performances Judges and winners of Poetry Competition

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18 18 Fresher’s 2017 Amity Law School Noida celebrated the Fresher’s on 29th August 2017.The celebrations went on with the dance performances soulful music and ramp walk performed by the freshers and concluded with the DJ Night.

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19 19 Glimpse of the Legal Awareness and Literary Cell The “Legal Awareness Literary Cell” of Amity Law School Noida headed by Dr. Brundaban Mishra and Ms. TN Sreedurga aims at spreading awareness regarding various socio-legal issues of our society. The team has organized two Legal Aid and Advice Camps on the issues of ‘Right to Education’ ‘F.I.R’ and ‘Sanitation.’ The first camp was conducted at Rasulpur Sikroda Ghaziabad on August 11 2017 and the second camp was conducted at Arvachin Sr. Secondary School Vivek Vihar New Delhi on August19 2017. Ms. Jasmine Chauhan apprised everyone about Right to Education Act RTI and the provision of free and compulsory education available for the students aged 6-14. Ms. Tamanna Kadiyan explained the procedure of filing an F.I.R and the measures which should be taken in cases of the com- plaint not being filed. Mr. Piyush Karan Singh apprised the students about sanitation and their Right to Life as enshrined in Section 21 of the Con- stitution which is inclusive of the need to maintain a clean environment and lead a healthy life. Further he reflected the concept of Swachh Bharat Abhiyan and its ongoing goals. The Nukkad Natak Team headed by Mr. Pawas Sharma performed on the topics of drugs alcohol and marijuana. Teachers Day Celebration 2017

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20 20 Career Counselling Seminar on “Unfolding the Layers of Law by Young Achievers” The Corporate Resource Centre of Amity Law School Noida had organized a Career Counselling seminar on “Unfolding the Layers of Law by Young Achievers.” The Career Counselling Seminar started with the lighting of the lamp and invocation of the Sarasvati Bandana led by the National Anthem. The knowledgeable session proceeded with the warm and hearty welcoming of the guests by Tulsa Saplings. Gap. Capt. A.K. Sabena Head of CRC gave the Introductory Address and he told the genesis of the seminar and spoke about the significance of the Seminar. Dr. D..K.Bandhyopadhya Chairman Amity Law Schools Noida address the gathering and asked the students “To stop following others do things differently and become a leader.” He stated that Amity Law School is the first Law School to have its own CRC. Prof. Dr. Balvinder Shukla Vice Chancellor of Amity University Uttar Pradesh addressed the gathering and shared the reason for the establishment of CRC Corporate Resource Centre. She told that companies approached Amity University for the placement of the law students and the idea of CRC came into existence. The seminar began with the brilliant speeches by the speakers. Ms. Kulbir Kaur Executive Director EY she basically talked about the kind of opportunity a law student has in the corporate world especially MNC’s. She categorised the opportunity into two i.e. back-office/support work or a fee earner. She also stated that a student should have confidence to perform and should have a strong desire to do something differently. Ms. Tanvi Khurana DJS Secretary Delhi Legal Services Authority mainly focussed upon the view on to how to become a judge. She said that to be successful in the field of law one should have humility and should have the mind-set to deliver justice to the common public. Mr. James M. Senior Partner INSART Advocates and Legal Associates was invited to share his experience in the field of litigation. He also told that law is not a profession its a vocation. Ms. Nadia Sambyal Senior Partner United Lex shared her college time experience when she was in her final year and she came to know about United Lex. She apprised the students about her company’s work culture and shared the struggle she has faced at the time of her recruitment and also when she initially joined the company. Mr. Nikhil Swoop is a member of Lawrato. He told students that “Solve the problem which is worth solving.” He introduced his website and discussed the kind of services his website is providing. This website is a platform for all the lawyers to get registered and to directly help the needy. They provide online advices in regard to any case to every client who is in need of help. Mr. Priyanka Garg is an Advocate at Karanjawala and Co. and an Alumni of Amity Law School. He discussed the various opportunities a student can have after getting the Law degree. He explained the options which are available to the students other than litigation like: Legal Journalism Legal Editors Corporate Communication Business Development Knowledge Management Head Hunting for Legal Industry Client Relationship Management Legal Education Operations Management and Soft Skills Training. He emphasised on the importance of doing internship at one place so that it becomes easy to get a PPO he spoke about network building SWOT Analysis and how to upgrade one’s Resume for better placements. The students had many takeaways from the seminar and in the question-answer round the students got an opportunity to interact with the speakers and got their queries resolved effectively.

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21 21 Amity Law School Noida organized a National Conference on “Postcolonialism:Indian Response and Transformation on 22-23 August 2017.The chief guests were Dr. Kavita Sharma President SAU Prof. Purushottam Aggarwal Member UPSC and Prof. Nuzhat Praveen Khan Dean School of Law Jamia. Faculty Members Research Scholars and students presented papers on the themes of the Con- ference. The event concluded with book release. National Conference on “Postcolonialism: Indian Response and Transformation

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22 22 1 st Amity National Alternate Dispute Redressal Tournament ADR 2017 Amity Law School Noida had organized its 1 st ADR competition from September 14-16 2017. The tournament consisted of four events viz. Med-Arb Competition Negotiation Compe- tition Client Counselling Competition and Arbitration Award Writing Competition. The event showcases fundamental opportunities to the participants to enhance their analytical advisory negotiation client-handling skills and such other legal aptitudes. It is a unique initiative aimed at providing a platform to students from across the nation to learn and hone their alternative dispute resolution skills. It is one of the best avenues nationwide where students can experience a medley of dispute resolution activities simultaneously. The session started with lamp lighting along with Ganesh Vandana. Prof. Dr. Aditya Tomer Additional Director Amity Law School Noida welcomed Mr. M.S Oberoi Senior Advocate and Prof. Dr. Shefali Raizada Additional Director Amity Law School Noida welcomed Hon’ble Justice Mukundakam Shar- ma Former Judge Supreme Court of India with a sapling. Prof. Dr. Shefali Raizada Additional Director Amity Law School Noida gave the welcome address she spoke about the achievements of Amity Law School Noida in organising such events and spoke on the importance of co-curricular activities for the students. She thanked and congratulated student co- ordinators for their tireless efforts to make this event successful. Prof. Dr. Aditya Tomer Additional Director Amity Law School Noida was called upon the stage for giving a brief upon the ADR Tournament he wel- comed both the judges and said that it is the 4 th Med-Arb Competition of Amity Law School Noida and under the flagship of Med-Arb Competition other competitions are also included this year. He said that this tournament seeks to inspire the students to use their talent. He welcomed all the teams and partici- pants coming from all over India to participate in this tournament. Mr. Tushar Ved Saxena Asst. Professor Amity Law School Noida gave the conceptual introduction of the tournament. He said that this tournament is a three day event including series of events and gave the details of the events. He also apprised that the event is possible because of the sincere efforts of the volunteers and the Faculty Members. Mr. M.S Oberoi Senior Advocate was invited to share his views. He enlightened the session by outlining the qualities of a successful lawyer amongst which the most important is the attitude of the lawyers. He stated that mediation is not a new concept but the process and procedure is entirely different from the manner it use to be earlier. He also said that mediation is a structured processes but also a flexible one. He spoke on the importance of meditation and arbitration. Hon’ble Justice Mukundakam Sharma Former Judge Supreme Court of India was called upon the stage to share his views. He expressed his gratitude to- wards everyone present in the session and the organising committee for inviting him. He said that such competitions conducted on relevant subject matters are very important and helpful for aspiring lawyers and for the ones who are practicing. He appreciated Amity Law School Noida for giving an opportunity to the law students for their overall development through this tournament. He talked about the Preamble i.e. the soul of our Indian Constitution and stated its message of India being a sovereign and a Democratic Republic in its own form. He spoke on globalisation and development of India in its own political manner. He concluded his speech by asking the law student to be the torch-bearers for mediation and arbitration. Mr. Mayank Kapila Asst. Professor Amity Law School Noida proposed the Vote of Thanks. He thanked all the members of the organising committee stu- dent co-ordinators participating teams and all the volunteers to make this tournament a successful one. On Day 1 September 14 2017 the preliminary rounds of Med-Arb Negotiation and Client Counselling competition started. The first preliminary round was of Med-Arb in which 18 teams participated and it took place in two sessions. The second preliminary round was of Negotiation Competition in which 16 teams participated and it also took place in two sessions. The third preliminary round was of Client Counselling Competition in which 16 teams participated and it took place in three sessions. The first day of the event concluded with the briefing session for the participants conducted by the Knowledge Partner SCC Online and with the declaration of results of the preliminary rounds. On Day 2 September 15 2017 the Quarter Final rounds took place in which 8 teams participated for Med-Arb Negotiation and Client Counselling competi- tion each. There were two rounds for the Quarter Finals for all the three competitions and 4 teams qualified for the Semi-Final round for Med-Arb Negotia- tion and Client Counselling competition each. ‘Arbitration Award Writing Competition’ also took place on the second day in which 8 teams participated. The second day of the event concluded with the declaration of results of the Quarter Final and Semi Final rounds. VALEDICTORY CEREMONY REPORT The valedictory ceremony of 1 st Amity ADR competition organized by Amity Law School commenced at 4:20 PM on 16 th September 2017. It was presided by Distinguished Guest of Honour Justice Dilip Raosaheb Deshmukh Former Judge Chhattisgarh High Court Distinguished Guest of Honour Justice Deepa Sharma Judge Delhi High Court and Guest of Honour Hon’ble Justice Sangita Dhingra Sehgal Judge Delhi High Court. They were accompanied on the dias by Prof. Dr. D. K. Bandyopadhyay Chairman Amity Law Schools Prof. Dr. Aditya Tomer Additional Director Amity Law School Noida and Prof. Dr. Shefali Raizada Amity Law School. The ceremony began with the lighting of lamp by all the esteemed guests on the dias. It was followed by presentation of saplings by Prof. Dr. D. K. Bandyopadhyay and all other amity dignitaries on the dias to all the distinguished guests of honour. Thereafter a welcome address was given by Prof.Dr. Aditya Tomer by expressing his gratitude to all. He also congratulated the Organising Committee faculties staff and students for all their efforts in organizing this event and making it a success. He highlighted the noble objectives behind the ADR competition and out of court settlements. Thereafter Prof. Dr. D.K. Bandyopadhyay started his address by welcoming the guests and thanking all the faculties staff and the students for putting up a wonderful event. He reiter- ated the opinion of Founder President Amity University Dr. Ashok K. Chauhan that the Law students are the torch bearers of bringing significant changes in the society. He also highlight- ed some special initiatives such as establishment of the Placement cell CRC Inter-disciplinary journals as well as many other novel initiatives such as establishment of Mediation Cell which are in pipeline. He ended his address by congratulating the winning as well as participating teams and emphasized the relevance of ADR in dispute resolution. Thereafter Mr. Nikhil Kashyap Assistant Professor Amity Law School Noida addressed the audience and presented a detailed day wise report of the event. He also stressed on the how ADR can help in lessening the burden of the judiciary. Guest of Honour Justice Dilip Raosaheb Deshmukh started his address by thanking the Amity University and the Amity Law School Noida for hosting such a novel and much needed event and inviting him for the same. He stressed on the relevance of field of law and quoted that to know that you don’t know is the beginning of the wisdom. He explained that ADR provides a win-win situation for all. He ended his address by wishing best of luck to all the participating teams as well as the organizers. Guest of Honour Justice Deepa Sharma started her address by quoting the famous Shakespeare play “Merchant of Venice” and explained its relevance with the ADR. She highlight- ed the role of a good lawyer is to be creative and carve out justice for his client within the four corners of law. She ended her address by thanking the organizers.

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23 23 Best Client Counselling team prize was won by NALSAR Hyderabad represented by Ms. Sreejaoy Bhatacharya and Ms. Shagun Deva- nakanda. They won the winning trophy and the cash prize of Rs. 12000/- SCC subscription internship at Phoenix Legal and a book on Arbi- tration Law. Best Med-Arb team prize was won by Christ University School of Law Bangalore represented by Ms. Sonal Bhargava and Mr. Amit Maurya. They won the winning trophy and the cash prize of Rs. 12000/- SCC subscription internship at Phoenix Legal and a book on Arbi- tration Law. Best Award writer prize was won by Kurukshetra University represented by Mr. Vishal Jha. He won the winning trophy and the cash prize of Rs. 6000/- SCC subscription internship at Phoenix Legal and a book on Arbitration Law. Best Negotiation Team prize was won by Christ University School of Law Bangalore represented by Ms. Sonal Bhargava and Mr. Amit Maurya. They won the winning trophy and the cash prize of Rs. 12000/- SCC subscription internship at Phoenix Legal and a book on Arbi- tration Law The ADR Best Team Rolling Trophy was given to Christ University School of Law Bangalore. They were also given a cash prize of Rs. 5000/ - SCC subscription Glimpses of ADR 2017

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24 24 High Level Delegation from American Bar Association visit to Amity University A high level delegation from the American Bar Association led by Ms. Hillarie Bass President of American Bar Association along with Mr. Gene Vance Vice Chair of Section of Litigation and Mr. Koji Fukumura the Chair of Section of Litigation visited Amity University Noida cam- pus on 19 September 2017. The aim of the visit was to provide an opportunity to the students to familiarize them on the legal provisions procedure in United States of America and also update them regarding their registration for legal practice in USA through American Bar Association. Addressing the gathering Ms. Hillarie Bass President American Bar Association said that American Bar Association ABA was established in the year 1878 as a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. She mentioned that the most im- portant activity of ABA is to set academic standards for Law Schools and to formulate Model Ethical Codes related to the legal profession. She highlight- ed that ABA spreads awareness amongst American public regarding the importance of independence of judiciary which helps in decision making During the occasion delegation from American Bar Association presented the “Certificate of Appreciation” to Amity Law School Noida in recognition to their contribution in legal education. Dr. Dilip Kumar Bandyopadhyay Chairman Amity Law Schools Dr. Shefali Raizada Addl. Director Amity Law School – I and Prof. Dr. Aditya Tomer Addl. Director Amity Law School II were also present.

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25 25 Seminar on “Globalization of Indian Legal System: New Trends Challenges and Expectations” The Corporate Resource Centre of Amity Law School Noida had organized a seminar on “Globalization of Indian Legal System: New Trends Chal- lenges and Expectations.” The Seminar started with the lighting of the lamp and invocation of the Saraswati Vandana led by the National Anthem. The knowledgeable session proceeded with the warm and hearty welcoming of the guests by giving Tulsi saplings. Mr. Shaharyar Khan Assistant Professor Chair CRC Amity Law School Delhi was invited to deliver the Welcome Address. He welcomed all the Chief Guest Guest of Honour Faculty Members team members of CRC and the audience. Thereafter Gp. Capt. A.K. Saxena Dy. Director Head-CRC Amity Law School Noida was called upon to give the introductory speech on the topic. He stated that in the coming day’s online research and video conferencing will become the way to deal in the field of law which is possible with globalisation on Indian legal system. The first speaker for the day was Mr. Siddharth Luthra Sr. Advocate Supreme Court of India Ex Additional Solicitor General of India. He shared the days when he was pursuing law he stated that during those days there was only three year L.L.B course in universities and there was no other option other than litigation. Later due to the concept of globalisation law firms came into existence broadening the scope of law in this area as well. He highlighted that the world is seen as one large trading unit and he also elaborated on the scope of Arbitration Alternate Dispute Resolution. Mr. Ashok Bhan Sr. Advocate Supreme Court of India was invited to enlighten audience on the topic. He said that the present law students are the future of the bar and the country. He discussed the micro and the macro dimensions of the subject. He also discussed that a major result of im- pact of globalisation on the Indian legal system is due to legal outsourcing. Ms. Akila Agrawal Partner Shardul Amarchand Mangaldas Law Firm was called upon to express her point of view on the topic. She dis- cussed that previously law firms had a very informal setup but now as a result of impact of globalisation on Indian legal system law firms are able to work easily and efficiently. She emphasised that a lawyer should always have a good character along with desired skills. Thereafter Hon’ble Justice Suresh Kumar Kait Judge High Court of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh was invited to express his views on the topic. He discussed about the subjects which should be taught to the law students for their qualitative education. He also spoke on the importance of co -curricular activities in the development of a student from the legal perspective. Dr. James Nedumpara Head and Professor Centre for International Trade and Investment Law CTIL IIFT was invited to speak on the topic. He discussed about the changing role of in-house counsels and collaboration of various countries and organisations altogether in research pro- jects. He also highlighted the importance of cross-border exchange of academics. He stated that Indian academics are more into legality and not reali- ty. He emphasised that Indian legal system should be more dynamic and real. Mr. Jeetendera Kumar Senior Manager HCL discussed about the avenues opening up for law professionals in HR domain. He also threw light upon the kind of sexual harassment and privacy issues which are faced by the employees in an industry or organisation. He said that lawyers need to be compliant. He also spoke about the impact of IT laws in IT industries. He discussed about the working of ICC Indian Complaint Committee and the changes in it after globalisation. He concluded his speech by saying that geographic boundaries can’t restrict the functioning of Indian legal system. Thereafter Ms. Abha Thapliyal Gandhi Publishing Director South Asia Press was invited to express her views on the impact of globalisation on the publishing field. She expressed her views by saying that law plays a very important role everywhere. She discussed the importance of publishing and stated that books and publishing helps people to achieve mortality. She outlined the jobs available in publishing sector for the law students such as Legal Editor Product Developer and marketing. She concluded her speech by talking about the Lexis-Nexis conference held in France where the ex- periment was conducted of combining the sales and legal editors together. In the Question-Answer round the students got an opportunity to interact with the speakers and got their queries resolved effectively. The event con- cluded with the felicitation of the guests. Ms. Garima Wadhwa Assistant Professor Amity Law School Noida proposed the Vote of Thanks. She also elaborated the takeaways from the seminar. She also thanked all the members of CRC team for working tirelessly to make this event successful.

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26 26 Planned Events: 25th October 2017: National Seminar cum Training Programme on “Rights of Women” with theme “Women Empowerment in India: Chal- lenging Stereotypes and Strengthening Nations” in collaboration with the National Human Rights Commission Delhi. We invite valued content on varied aspects of Law from:  Faculty Members and students from Amity Law Schools Noida and other AUUP Institutions  Faculty Members and students from Universities and Institutions across India  Researchers Legal Professionals and career experts

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