American Heritage: Dioramas in Perspective

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American Heritage: Dioramas in Perspective by Jim McCullough produced from 1974-1991.

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AMERICAN HERITAGE DIORAMAS IN PERSPECTIVE BY JIM MCCULLOUGH This is a collection of photographs but the point is that all of them are of three dimensional dioramas constructed between 1974 and 1991 of scenes where every item was manufactured to preserve all rules of perspective. We have never seen or known of anyone else who carved and constructed in rigid perspective. Photographs cannot really convey the depth that has been built in whereas the human eyes viewing the dioramas can really have the illusion of being there. Only 110 of these dioramas exist in the world today as far as we can tell.

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Back in the 1950s Louise and I were wandering the shops in Juarez, Mexico across the border from El Paso when we found this "shadow box" of a kitchen scene. It was very inexpensive but quite charming. As an engineer, the lack of adherence to the rules of perspective was a bit troublesome. Later research was to reveal that our scene was a "Mexican Copy" of a typical Alpine craft of Austrian, Swiss or German carvers. The examples of European craftsmen that I found did not necessarily keep to perspective either. I often thought it would be fun to see if I could make one which would follow these rules rigorously and thus convey a feeling of greater depth. In 1974 I started my first . . . . diorama. It was about 12 ” x12 ” x 3 ” deep and lacked perspective. Note how the ceiling beams and horizontal shelves don ’ t “ look right ”

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No. 74 -1 “ Colonial Cabinet Maker ’ s Shop ” Here the wood spindle is actually held in the functional vise. All of the tools have metal blades sharpened to a cutting edge, pliers and tongs are functional, and the plane has a metal blade. The trap door in the ceiling was added at the end of fabrication, made necessary to bring light into the scene. The fireplace was carved from wood and painted to look like stone. All items in this and all subsequent dioramas were made by hand and machine in the diorama shop with very few exceptions.

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No. 74- 2 “ The Village Blacksmith ” The forge was carved from a wooden block and hollowed to accept a light bulb and red lens. The effect of coal was achieved by cementing broken glass to a plastic sheet and painting the border an opaque black. The glowing iron bar was formed of bent plastic and transmits the red color from the fire. The apron is real leather and is split with individual leg ties so the smith could straddle the horses hooves in the shoeing process. The forge hood is metal. Owned by Ms Ursula Sperry, Buena Pk. CA.

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No. 74 -3 “ COUNTRY STORE ” The advent of the country store helped America develop as a series of communities. They became the center of activity for all of the rural areas. Locally cured hams hung from the ceiling beams, and other produce and products of local crafts people and farmers found their way into the stores. Often the shop keeper would trade merchandise for merchandise, always getting a little more than he had to give. Money was little known, and credit was a way of life. Owned by Mr & Mrs Rembert Gaddy, deceased. Present owner & location unknown.

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No. 74 - 4 “ Frontier Cabin ” The fireplace was carved into the rear wall of the cabin scene and each brick then painted to show brick and mortar. The beams were carved to simulate hand hewing, as were the ceiling beams. The hides on the two side walls are of real deer skin, and the chair seat is woven to simulate a rush seat. Fixtures include a blanket chest, wool wheel, trestle table, churn, water bucket, and a cupboard with wooden trenchers (bowls) and metal plates. On the fireplace are a rifle, powder horn, and shooting bag. A candle mold hangs below the stretched pelt. Soot and smoke stains provide realism to the fireplace. Was owned by Mr. & Mrs. Rembert Gaddy, now deceased. Location unknown.

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No. 74 - 5 “ Gaslight Era Butcher Shop ” 1900 was before the advent of refrigeration. The “ Ice Box ” was loaded through a chute with large cakes of ice that slowly melted. Window shades, shade trees, and awnings were used to keep the whole shop as cool as possible to preserve the ice and thus, the meat. Marble counters stayed until about 1917 when open display of meat was prohibited. Hams, bacon, and salted meats were hung from hooks such as those along the right wall. Barrels of iced fish were kept available. In the back hall, opposite the ice-box door, the butcher ’ s sweater and hat wait for those times he will spend more than just a moment in the ice-box. Hanging from the ceiling are wrapping string and a bone saw, and horns from prize steers sold in previous seasons. Owned by Cindy Begley, St. Louis MO.

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No. 74-6 “ 1913 Ford Model T ” The automobile in the revolution of the American way of life in the early 20th century. From the standpoint of mass production, the Model T is most representative of this new way to mobility. The workbench is cluttered - as in any garage - with cylinder head, spark plugs, tools and gears. On the rear wall is an early telephone, surrounded with grease smears, scribbled telephone numbers. The parts room is much neater and lighter than typical, but perhaps more “ charming ” . The hood rests under the car where it is out of the way, while the open engine block shows the tops of four pistons. This was the last year when model Ts had brass radiators, headlights and lanterns. Later cars had black steel lamps and plain radiators.

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No. 74 - 7 “ The One Room School ” of the 1860s, (as the map shows WV was still part of VA). Cloak-room stocks books - which were very rare in those days - and forgotten scarf. Seating of various types for children of different sizes. The teacher ’ s table has a dictionary, quill pen, apple, and a pointer (or is it a hickory stick?). The Declaration of Independence, Constitution, samples of penmanship, the pendulum clock, and a picture of President Washington, as well as students ’ papers and the “ duty roster ” for keeping the water bucket and coal scuttle filled. On the bench, along with MacGuffy ’ s Readers, is the school marms hand-bell, high stool with the conical “ dunce ” cap. The right window, shows two buildings labeled “ boys ” and “ girls ” . Owned by former school teacher, Mrs. Cindee Sirgany of Miami, FL.

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No. 74 - 8 “ A Frontier Saloon ” The poker table is strewn with cards and chips, and empty holsters are slung over the chair backs. A sign proclaims that “ shootin ’ irons must be turned into the marshall ” . A lone spur on the floor will soon be missed, and the cowboy will come in search of it. A carpet-bag and saddle-bag at the end of the bar indicate the recent arrival of the stage. It ’ s dark as one looks out of the swinging doors, so it won ’ t be long before the footlights are lit and the dancing girls appear accompanied by the professor playing the piano. Behind the bar is the bartender ’ s sink and towels, and his six shooter is on the back bar. ( This DIORAMA NO LONGER EXISTS, it was MODIFIED to change the theme. SEE NEXT DIORAMA- SUPERBOWL 17 )

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THE NEW 74-8- “ SUPERBOWL XVII ” A Dallas Cowboy promo had Redskins being bowled over by swinging doors in a Western Saloon and this is the answer. Game 1 Lions and game 2 ’ s Viking Headdress is in the spittoon. Ready for game 3, winner to the Superbowl, John Riggins wears the scalps of the cowboy ’ s defensive line and linebackers from his waist neatly labeled by name. John is saying: “ Come out from behind the bar Tom, you don ’ t have enough hair to scalp. ” Look at the next picture and you will see Tom Landry in White hat and cowboy boots cringing on the floor behind the bar. That ’ s how the game came out.- and THEN . . The “ Killer Bees ” of the Miami Dolphins are stomped on the floor, YEA Redskins. John wears the top hat which he tipped to supreme court justice Sandra Day OConner. Owned by Mr & Mrs Scott Jameson of Houston TX

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Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the Superbowl ‘ Twas back in the years eighty-two and three, The TV was flickering for all to see. One-by-one the weekends came, The Redskins hung in and won each game. The rebuilding Skins three games were to win When a walk-out was called - it was a great sin. While NFL players on their duffs were to rest Canadian League games put fans ’ patience to test. Negotiations ran on with emphasis on bucks, Network TV funds then became the crux. “ Give us over half ” , Mr. Garvey insisted, The season ’ s almost gone and the owners resisted. A compromise plan draft at last was attempted. To the players it went - would it be accepted? Landry left home, a commercial to shoot In leather coat, stetson hat, and cowboy boot. Into the saloon - where some Redskins, he braces. In his departure he pushes swinging doors in their faces. Players wisely accept club owners ’ compromise. Back to practice with an NFL schedule to revise. And so it came - a new play-off format. The Skins decided they ’ d not be a door-mat The defense started stuntin ’ - the Hogs began gruntin ’ “ Twas clear that the title was what they were huntin ’ . Where season games were decided in final clock ticks In the play-offs the Skins came like a ton of big bricks. The game plan was simple - Joe Gibbs had decided Riggins up the middle - ‘ til opposition subsided. First came the Lions, then Vikes and now Dallas. For the Skins to succeed, they must be quite callous. Landry ’ s ad, meant to be fun - but his Cowboys were done. NFC title by Skins is won - without the use of a shotgun! The Superbowl Game found our hogs in their diggins. Miami ’ s “ killer bees ” were stomped by our Riggins. In all of the games John Riggins was prominent, The Redskins Team proved they were dominant. At the end of this triumph, John took a deep bow That wasn ’ t a showboat - what a runner - oh wow! Jim McCullough, Redskins Fan ^ ^ Behind Bar Sits Tom Landry in white hat and colorful boots I I

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No. 74 - 9 “ The Post Office - General Store ” In the mail-box unit, each of the dividers is NON-parallel with all of the others. The checker players ’ chairs. The chairs do not touch the wall or the glass, nor the cracker barrel. Since all of these items are placed in only 3.75 inches between the glass and back wall, it is obvious that they are very compressed. Each is actually about one inch deep. The basket of apples is woven of wire, and the oaken buckets hanging from the ceiling are carved of oak. The tools have metal blades, sharpened as appropriate, but the hams are wood. In the general store, much of the stock was taken in trade. The store keeper accepted the surplus of the farms and products of the craftsmen in the community in exchange for the wide variety of goods he carried. Now owned by Ray Thomas McCullough, Attorney, of Pasadena CA

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No. 74 - 10 “ The Colonial Kitchen ” Fireplaces provided cooking heat, room warmth, and much of the light. Utensils hung close at hand including cast iron pots. The chair-table combo is called a “ settle ” . They sat on the hearth, floor, a Windsor style chair, and a bench made from a split hickory log. A candle-jack kept the candle at the proper height for reading. Housewives spun yarn, transferring it to the clock-reel which measured it to install on a loom. Pierced tin and tin-plate lanterns hang ready. In the foreground is a “ hetchel ” , or “ heckle ” , used to separate fibers before spinning. Finer “ cards ” were used for weaving of fine yarn. A churn suggests the farm had a cow or two. They used wooden bowls, or “ trenchers ” , made from tree burls, instead of china or pewter plates. Candle molds and a tinder box occupy the mantle. Will be owned by Terry and Jodi Jameson, of Lake of the Woods, VA

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No. 74 - 11 “ The Gunsmith ’ s Shop ” Highly skilled Swiss and German immigrants made guns with rare accuracy in the era - 1750 to 1850. The barrel was a feat, for bars of iron, as well as tools, were not of sufficient quality to permit boring out a barrel from bar stock. The smith had to wrap a flat sheet of iron around a mandrel and forge weld it to produce barrels. After forming and welding, the barrels were annealed or softened and stresses were relieved by burying it in a bed of hickory coals and allowing it to cool overnight. It was then filed into an octagonal shape, reamed to remove inner imperfections and then rifled on the bench shown in the left foreground. Rifling was pushing a tiny tool called a “ broach ” in and out of the barrel while causing the tool to make one revolution in the barrel length. A minute amount was scraped each time, and many trips, made one groove. When all grooves were completed, a very accurate gun barrel was created. Here, all steps have hopefully been portrayed. Owned by Carter Leidy, An artist in Philadelphia PA.

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No. 74 - 12 “ The Ship Chandler ” This diorama was created to represent the heritage of the sea and its part in our history. Originally a supplier of candles for ships, the chandler added other goods and services to his shop located conveniently on or near the wharf. He would contract for casks, kegs, barrels, and hogs heads from the cooper, also provisions from the farmers and butchers, and metal parts from the smith or brass worker. He would trade merchandise for shipping space and act as a passenger agent for ship captains. He kept a stock of emergency items, navigational equipment, and necessities such as rope and lamps. Boat hooks, gaffs, harpoons, lobster traps, fish nets, and even cannon were available for the captain to purchase or take in trade. The rope on the floor is back spliced, and the wooden fid was used to open the coils during the splicing process. The line around the bullard in the background is eye spliced. Can you smell the salt air? Owned by Emitt Witt, Rolla MO. Was owned by Price Merrels, LOW, VA.

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No. 74 - 13 “ A Country Church ” This is the first of the church dioramas and does not represent any one church or denomination. The use of deacons benches for pews indicates an early time period and also is helpful in keeping the scene open for the viewer. The four candles are “ lighted ” through the use of fiber optics. The stained glass windows portray calming the waters, Christmas, Easter,and the sermon on the mount. These were created by painting with opaque dyes on plastic which has been crazed through sanding to give the “ glass ” texture. Note that all joints in the deacons benches had to be assembled using dowels the size of toothpicks. The open Bible on the stand in the right background was a difficult carving to do. Now owned by nephew, James McCullough, MD, of Bloomfield Hills, MI

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No. 74 - 14 “ A Colonial Newspaper Room ” Features an old wooden press and the typesetting equipment that one might find in the time of the revolution. Particularly in the small towns one man might be the editor, publisher, compositor, pressman, and at the same time handle advertising and distribution. Although conceived earlier, actual fabrication was accomplished with the ultimate purchaser of this diorama in mind. The galley proofs, papers on the desk and floor all feature “ Capital Punishment ” and a byline. The column is titled, “ Boston throws party for King; the king is a no-show ” . The calendar on back wall indicates the month and year of the Boston Tea Party. Researched at the PA Farm Museum at Landis Valley, where a wooden press is still in use. Owned by the late Art Buchwald, world renowned humor columnist who enjoyed his diorama for about thirty years in his Washington DC residence. It is now owned by Mr. & Mrs. Joel Buchwald, of Washington DC, Art ’ s son.

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No. 74 - 15 “ An 1870 Hardware Store ” With the Industrial Revolution, when iron and steel products were mass produced and stores began to specialize in particular lines of merchandise, it changed us. Whereas only a few years earlier, almost all items of hardware and tools were custom made by the nearby blacksmiths, or by the consumers themselves, by 1870 the hardware store was well established. New items appeared, such as metal buckets. It took time for a cooper to make a bucket, but the new factories made them of galvanized iron very rapidly and thus less expensive. Fasteners and repair parts for larger items required a methodical manner of storing and stock retrieval. For many decades the hardware store had walls of small drawers and pigeon holes to keep their stock. The ceiling still provided useful storage, and the kegs used for bulk shipment of nails became handy racks for tools and handles. Sign: Bixlers in Carlisle, PA, the second oldest shop of its kind still in business at the time it was made.. Part of the Hechinger collection “ Tools in Motion ” of the Arts and Artists of Washington DC and displayed in travelling art exhibits.

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No, 75 - 1 “ Gunsmith II ” The popularity of the first gunsmith diorama and my own enjoyment of the craft resulted in this second scene. Here, an attempt is made to continue the all-step coverage of the fabrication, and the use of “ stone ” walls that are so typical of southeastern PA. Several more guns were fashioned and included in this scene than in the first version. The powder horns are actually carved of ivory and are decorated a la scrimshaw. This was owned by the late Mr. & Mrs. Alex Deemer but now belongs to their three daughters and it is in a family retreat, in Brookville Pennsylvania.

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No. 75 - 2 “ Pennsy Depot ” The railroads of the Civil War period had engines that burned wood stacked in the tender. This is a small town ’ s station. They really didn ’ t change much from the time they were built until automobiles and airplanes resulted in the near demise of the passenger train in the period just after World War II. Traveling by train was usually not a quick trip. If a person spent the money for fare, it was generally for a long time. So, instead of a number of suitcases, a trunk was packed and shipped by express. Note, too, the telegraph office that was so closely linked to the railroad. Owned by the late Mr. & Mrs. Allan Shivers of Austin, and Woodville, Texas. Mr. Shivers was an investment banker and served as Governor of Texas from 1949 to 1957. It is in son Brian ’ s ranchhouse in Woodville TX.

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No, 75 - 3 “ Lamprecht Bakery ” This was my first direct commission, with subject and color scheme the main consideration. Yellows and browns were used to complement other earth tones and create a whimsical bakery with “ baked ” goods that make one ’ s mouth water. The ovens were put into the scene to add the warmth of glowing fires. The cabinets are full of pastries, cream puffs, chocolate eclairs, danish sweet rolls, jelly filled “ long chons ” , and other “ no-nos ” for the adult diet, helping to create a fun scene. The back wall features a cuckoo clock and bread cabinets, while the table in the brick floored kitchen holds baking pans, cookie sheets, and a mixing pan. Wrapped packages are destined for names of persons known to the sponsor, as is the flour sack under the clock. This one is owned by Frank & Lin McCullough who reside in Burr Ridge IL. Text Text Text Text Text

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No 75 - 4 “ The Blacksmith II ” This places more emphasis on the role of the smith in manufacturing, rather than as a shoer of horses. Here we see patterns for hinges and sheet metal boxes hung over the bench, and samples on the back wall. Farriers ’ tools are in the box under the post drill, and a goodly stock of shoes shows that the smith must still care for the draft horses in the area. Rod, bar stock, and wire are available to fashion whatever the customer requires. A cluttered workbench indicates that the smith has a lot to do. The stone walls show the soot and blacking of many fires in the forge, and the dirt floor is strewn with scrap. Interesting is the deflection of the image of the bar cooling in the bucket in front of the forge. Methods of # 74-2 were again used to make the fire and red-hot bar being heated. This diorama is owned by Terry Jameson of Lake of the Woods, VA

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No. 76 - 1 “ A Country Church ” Here, 14 strands of fiber optics provide illumination for seven candles. Six stained glass windows and an organ console & pipes are added. In this, the windows portray the life of Christ: first His birth, then the young manhood as a carpenter, the teaching of the masses, healing of the infirm, driving the money changers from the temple, and finally, the triumph of resurrection. All furniture is extensively carved - the altar, lecturn, pulpit, organ, and pastor ’ s chair. Bibles and hymnals are found on the deacon ’ s bench style pews. Owned by Mrs. Idell Boone of Greensboro, NC Text Text Text

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No. 76 - 2 “ The Book Printer ” In this study of the graphic arts, the press is the center of attraction, while the back room displays a book bindery and stock room. Featured here are drying racks for the printed sheets, which took much longer to dry since the chemistry of inks was not what it is today. All of the sheets, the scrap on the floor and other samples herein were actually printed on the carved “ type ” mounted on the press. Tools and equipment are quite representative of the state of the art in this depicted early 19th century shop. Owned by the late Mr. Emil Braunert of Bielefeld, West Germany, owner of Eilers Werke, a large printing company in international trade. Seeking present owner and location.

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No. 76 - 3 “ Bakery II ” This bakery places the tantalizing pastries close to the front of the scene and mouth-watering cream puffs, eclairs, cakes , pies, cherry tarts, sweet rolls, iced donuts was found to stimulate viewers ’ appetites during exhibitions. Furniture is all of walnut. In the back room, the heat of the glowing ovens complement the polished copper pots, kettles, an old sink, cookie sheets and oven pans stacked against the wall. The lower portion of the right cabinet is a pierced-tin “ pie safe ” from early American time periods. Owned by Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan Kovler of Chicago, IL Mr. Kovler operated an art gallery on Michigan Ave. and was an owner of the Chicago Bulls of the NBA.

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No. 76 - 4 “ St. Mark ’ s ” A Lutheran Church in Toledo, OH . Made for Sandy & Dick Wargowsky of Alexandria, VA as it appeared on the day they were married. Altar details are shown on the next page. Furniture and paneling are walnut, and 14 candles are lit by 28 strands of fiber optics. The stained glass windows are painted and back lighted. Hymnals seen on the front choir pews are also found in racks on the back of other pews. Keys and stops can be identified on the organ console . Colonel Wargowsky, USAF, Ret. is a West Point graduate and engineer. Sandy has a degree in education and taught school for many years. They are friends of long standing.

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ALTAR DETAILS OF ST. MARKS CHURCH The back panelling was carved of walnut using pictures from their wedding album. The wood cross cut out, painted and affixed The basic figure of Jesus was purchased, and modified by lengthening hair, adding a smile, changing the right hand from a closed hand to an open palm up, and bringing the toes of one foot out from under the robe. Unfortunately these details are not visible in this picture. The candles which actually illuminate in their candelabrum, and the flowers were carved of wood. The brass cross and bible stand with open bible were also hand made.

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No. 77 - 1 “ Ship Chandlery II ” The anchor and 22 link anchor chain and clevis joint were each carved from a single piece of wood, and all links moved freely before it was painted and cemented down. The binnacle on the floor contains a compass, while the binnacle head on the shelves does not. The capstan and its handles are turned from walnut and pine while the chest is of walnut with brass corners. Ropes in center foreground and around bullard in left background illustrate the back and eye splices. The rack at left includes harpoons, lances, flensing knives, sweeps, and oars. The list of items available to the ships ’ captains provide an insight to this “ sea-side supermarket ” . Owned by daughter Carol & Tal Godding of Samammish, WA Both are retired from Boeing Aircraft Corp. Carol was in management and Tal an electrical engineer.

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No. 77 - 2 “ The Bullets Win ” This was quite a challenge - to compress an immense arena into a 6 ” depth and still give the viewer a feeling for its size. Portal 13 provides a frame, and through it one can see all the way across the arena (a real distance of 3 ” beyond the railing). On the far side we see portal 4 topped by the shot clock. To the left over the stairway is the top of portal 3. To the right are the suspended scoreboards and the huge telescreens with “ instant replay ” of an Elvin Hayes “ stuff ” . The scoreboard says the game is over and the Bullets have won. If one looks over the rail of the diorama he ’ d see the basketball floor, the portable goal. and lots more the the seating. Looking up, some of the spotlight for the floor can be seen. Sticklers for detail will find that each row of seats on the far side has the correct number of seats and every row is there. Formerly hung in what was The Capitol Club of the now demolished Capital Centre in Largo, MD. it was owned by the late Abe Pollin, President of the NBA Wizards and NHL Capitals . Present owner and location is unknown.

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No. 77 - 3 “ THE BIRD CARVER ” was created with the present owner in mind, its a whimsical idea of how a bird carver ’ s shop might have looked. To keep the scene timeless, no electric power tools are represented and nothing is shown that would not fit anywhere into the past 200 years. The bird carvings are in various stages of completion, and the clutter of tools and shavings provide some reality to the carver ’ s shop. The carved stone fireplace and curtains bring in. In the foreground are wooden molds used to cast bird feet, and over the roaring fire, a pot is bringing the lead to pouring temperature. On the foot stool, an open jacknife (with wooden handle and steel blade) sits on a current whittling project. The workbench, with two drawers ajar, is made of walnut. Perhaps too fancy for the working carver, it does show off brass drawer pulls. Out of the window reveals a millpond with the old mill on the far side, providing a setting for the carver to study wild fowl in their element. Owned by Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Zeller, a world class carver who now resides in East Barre, Vermont.

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No. 77-4 “ Bridgeport 1897 ” This was commissioned to portray the first “ premium parlor ” of the S & H Green Stamp Company, known at the time as the Merchants ’ Supply Company. The scene was created from the single photograph available in the company files. Because this photo lacked clarity, considerable latitude was possible in creating the “ premiums ” in the shop and still maintain the overall appearance shown in the photograph. A change of vantage point permitted the reorientation of the the long narrow room and allowed a “ peek-around-the-corner ” where more paintings and lamps were displayed. Carved and painted scenery outside the window was first used in this work. The existence of electric lighting was first acknowledged with the “ knob and tube ” type common in the 1897 period. Owned by Frederick A. Collins, Pres. and later, James Kelly, Pres & hung in Sperry Hutchinson corporate headquarters at 330 Madison Ave. NYC Present owner & location unknown.

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No. 77 - 5 “ Walmer ’ s Doll House Shop ” Created for the present owner, details were included to portray meaningful facets of the art of making doll houses. It is whimsical, since the real shop was a modern, highly mechanized factory that manufactured on a production basis. Mr. Walmer ’ s love of hand tools and the smell of wood shavings is perhaps better captured here than in a real life of schedules, quotas, cost estimates, and employee concerns. The three doll houses were actually models designed and in production by Mr. Walmer. The “ marble roller ” on the rear right wall was one of the first toys he produced. In the foreground house, plastic light rods glow in the windows, while the old “ ten-plate ” stove glows as it warms the room. All tools have sharpened metal blades, and shavings litter the floor. Fern Walmer was here too, however, for most of the sawdust has been swept away “ to keep Harry from tracking up the house ” . Owned by Fern Walmer of Potomac Falls, VA & Montserrat, B.W.I. Col. Harry Walmer, now deceased, had a full Air Force career before doing doll house kits.

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No. 77 - 6 “ 18 State Circle ” This is the gallery of the Maryland Federation of Art, a restored warehouse across the street from the Maryland Statehouse. I frequently exhibited here, and a miniature diorama appears in the room in the same place where most of my works were shown. This portrayal shows a wide range of styles and themes that are typical of most MFA exhibits. (The exception here, is all art was done by one person.) The spotlight effect proved more effective than anticipated, plexiglass pieces picking up rays from the main source of illumination and reflecting it toward the viewer. This photograph does not show a ceramic mobile that is hung just to the right of center. One must look at the back of the two side panels, and on the rear wall, to see all of the framed art works on display. Owned by Jack & Helga LaFollette of Arvada, CO. , long-time friends of the artist.

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No. 78 - 1 “ Gunsmith III ” The third PA Rifle gunsmith shop . Making the barrel from flat plates stored under the rifling bench, first, heating and forming a mandrel on the anvil, then one in a vise as the outside is filed to an octagonal cross section and finally into the rifling bench where the lands and grooves are formed. A finished gun is at the left, with a bag of shot, powder horn, bullet mold, and test targets proving the accuracy to the purchaser. An apprentice ’ s practice barrel, with trial welding is in the left foreground.A stock is being sawn in the nearest vise. Owned by Barbara York of Lake of the Woods, VA. Her late husband, Fred, was a retired U.S. Marine

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No. 78 - 2 “ The Wright Brothers ’ Machine Shop ” A accurate look at the shop where Wilber and Orville Wright made the first aeroplanes in the early 1900s. The real Dayton shop is in Henry Ford ’ s Greenfield Village in MI . In the left back corner a one cylinder engine ran on illuminating gas, and powered the system of belts, pulleys, and shafts that operated all machinery. On the back wall is a model of the wind tunnel built by the Wrights. The first in operation in America, produced much information that the brothers used in designing gliders and powered airplanes. The tunnel revealed many errors in theories expounded by other aviation experimenters, and resulted in success where others failed. In the left foreground, between a pedestal grinder and a band saw, is a copy of the first engine used in 1903. It was made in this shop, for no other manufacturer attempted to build such a device for a flying machine. All during the time of this experimentation the shop continued to produce and service bicycles, financing their aviation efforts. Owned by Doug & Christel Eilers, Crooked Isle, Bahamas

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No. 78 - 3 “ VOLUNTEER FIRE COMPANY ” (early 1800s.) The engine, pulled by manpower, and water supplied by intake hoses on the pumper, or by bucket brigade. It was obvious the brigades weren ’ t efficient for roofs and upper floors, so the pump evolved. Earlier, the nozzle mounted on the engine, was too close to the fire. When the canvas hose proved feasible, this engine appeared. The two long handles on its sides were inserted across the front and rear when it reached the fire, with room for lots of willing hands, The two pistons provided intake and outflow pressure and firefighting became more effective. Later, steam replaced manpower at the pump and they were drawn by horses. Finally the internal combustion engine, used to move the vehicle and do the pumping. On the back wall and far side are some tools adapted from everyday use when found needed at the scene. These are the axe, shovel, crow bar, hooks (pikes), and ladders, Leather helmets were not mass produced, and each one always had a flap in the back to keep water off a man ’ s neck, a visor, and a rigid frame to protect the head. Owned by Harvey Freishtat, Esq., and Brenda of Brookline, MA

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No. 78-4 “ OUTWARD BOUND ” My first outdoor scene and attempts to show the environment on sailing vessels of the 1700s. This was the time of the privateer, a commercial ship that plied the oceans with cargoes of opportunity, and mounted cannon for protection. Of course, if a weaker ship of an unfriendly nation were encountered, the privateer (pirate?) didn ’ t hesitate to take it as a prize. Thus, many battles at sea during the American Revolution involved privateers. The locally made Clipper ships proved durable, fast, and maneuverable which helped the rapid rise of American sea power in the last quarter of the 18th and into the 19th century. Time was kept aboard with the hour glass and when the glass was turned, the bell was struck. The ship ’ s staff maintained a detailed log, as well as conditions and landmarks in view when the ship was in unfamiliar areas. It was from these logs that early captains and navigators were able to prepare or correct their current charts. Navigation using the sextant, stars, and sun was known well in these times to fix positions. The galley smoke stack was usually called “ Charlie Noble ” and was kept brightly shined.

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No. 78-4 “ OUTWARD BOUND ” My first outdoor scene and attempts to show the environment on sailing vessels of the 1700s. This was the time of the privateer, a commercial ship that plied the oceans with cargoes of opportunity, and mounted cannon for protection. Of course, if a weaker ship of an unfriendly nation were encountered, the privateer (pirate?) didn ’ t hesitate to take it as a prize. Thus, many battles at sea during the American Revolution involved privateers. The locally made Clipper ships proved durable, fast, and maneuverable which helped the rapid rise of American sea power in the last quarter of the 18th and into the 19th century. Time was kept aboard with the hour glass and when the glass was turned, the bell was struck. The ship ’ s staff maintained a detailed log, as well as conditions and landmarks in view when the ship was in unfamiliar areas. It was from these logs that early captains and navigators were able to prepare or correct their current charts. Navigation using the sextant, stars, and sun was known well in these times to fix positions. The galley smoke stack was usually called “ Charlie Noble ” and was kept brightly shined.

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No, 78 - 5 “ The Decoy Carver ’ s Shop ” A decoy carver ’ s workshop taken from the style of Maryland ’ s famed Ward Brothers. Since I had only a few photos of the shop, I tried to capture what I was able to see in the background. A neat appearance did not rate highly on the priority list of the brothers when they were at work. We assume that it ’ s autumn, for the leaves are changing and an old shotgun rests at the door with a box of shells to use when a hunter decides to test the decoys to see if ducks would come in on them. As you view the scene, I guess the bandsaw and power sander and such must be “ behind ” you. Carvers in these times can ’ t do it all with a knife and axe anymore. It was purchased by Mrs. Elizabeth Williams of Salisbury, MD who placed it for permanent display in the Wildfowl Art Museum of the Ward Foundation in Salisbury. Thirty-five more decoy shops, all different, could be in found homes across America.

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No. 78 - 6 “ World War II Cadet Barracks ” “ Where I grew up ” . Each cadet had a foot locker and half a clothes bar between the cots. Pictures only inside the foot locker lids. At stand-by inspections, lockers were open for inspecting officers, clothing was folded or rolled neatly. Hanging clothing was buttoned fully and nothing was to be hidden in them. At the foot of the bed, a barracks bag hung for soiled laundry, but a pair of unshined shoes might be illegally hidden. Inspectors rarely checked the laundry bag. Highly shined shoes in specified order. If a man was excused from inspection, his bed was folded unmade as in the left foreground. A “ butt can ” in the center of the aisle held two inches water but no butts during daily inspections. Friday night “ G-I Party ” floors were scrubbed, windows washed, latrines shined, and rafters dusted. Anywhere a white glove could reach was fair game for dust detection at the Saturday stand-by.

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No. 78 - 7 “ Decoy Carver II ” This diorama was made as a mirror image of 78-5 because it had been sold and the new purchasers wanted one just like it. So, the scene was “ flopped ” and included were all of the types of articles and furnishings to present the same charm for the new owners. An added feature is a steaming coffee pot, different outdoor scenery, and some art on the walls. A little more detail was possible because of techniques learned in doing the first carver ’ s shop. Originally owned by Mr. & Mrs. William F. Chew of Owings Mill and Ocean City, Maryland, it is now owned by grandson, Warren Chew in the greater Baltimore area.

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No. 78 - 8 “ They Shall Not Pass ” As a companion piece to “ The Bullets Win ” , this diorama was an attempt to catch the feel of the Capital Centre when the Caps were playing hockey. Only the second attempt at replicating a human figure. The lighting effects were a real challenge, for the overhead lights highly illuminate the surface of the ice, but the area occupied by the viewer is in relative darkness. In real life, spot and floodlights can be aimed with precision but in this space of only five inches, it becomes more difficult. Tubular bulbs below the “ ice ” and above the ceiling provide the principal light source. Light rays are bent around corners to illuminate the score-board advertising bank.

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No. 79 - 1 “ GOT OUR LIMIT ” A mythical duck hunter ’ s cabin during the excitement of the hunting season. The heroes arrived at the cabin yesterday and stayed up too late indulging in a bit of poker and spirits. To the jangle of the alarm clock on the mantle, they rose early and were in their blind as the first light of dawn found ducks looking for their morning meal. With stout heart and steady aim, they got their limit and came back to the cabin. The ducks were hung on the tree outside to cool down and our intrepid hunters did what came naturally......went back to their bunks. Oh, the other hunter? He ’ s asleep right behind you. Shhhhh. This and 78-3 are owned by Harvey Frieshtat, Esq., Brookline, MA.

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No. 79- 2 “ DECOY CARVER III ” This scene represents the sort of shop more sportsmen would really like to own, being able to work on decoys. It ’ s a really fun type of vocation right in the area where they can knock off (in the proper season, of course) to hunt, fish, tong a few oysters, or put down a crab trap right off the private pier. While we ’ re at it, let ’ s will our sportsman to be very skilled at making decoys with a ready market so he can enjoy the good life. Owned by son of Mr. C. J. Schroering of Louisville, KY. , Allen Schroering, a bird carver. Location and correspondance path unknown.

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No. 79 - 3 “ JOHN MULLICAN ’ s WORKSHOP ” An idealized version of John ’ s shop- perhaps a combination of what he had and what he ’ d like to have had. Naturally, a great bird carver would prefer big windows overlooking woods and water to observe birdlife and gather inspiration. John didn ’ t have the windows, but his carvings are quite inspired even though he was of necessity, urbanized. The carving in the center on the workbench is my impression of how John ’ s 1979 World Championship carving entry looked a couple of months before judging. The shop is more contemporary than others, for electrical power tools are much in evidence as they are in his real shop. The cage below the right window is home to John ’ s companion, a dove, who is free to fly while John is carving. John & Karen now live in Sharpsburg, MD. He specializes in wood and bronze sculptures as well as in wildlife painting.

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No. 79 - 4 “ Post Office and General Store II ” Items here replicate much of the others although a portable sewing machine and many more bottles are included. A store like this was in almost every town, village, or hamlet in the last two decades of the 19th century and some are still operating today. Much of the merchandise shown here was lost when mail order companies began. But, the general store still took in farm produce and craftsmen ’ s products and made it available to all. The inclusion of a post office was a great boon, not only for the federal income but because it brought the whole community into the store from time to time. The scene from the window depicts a wheelmaker ’ s shop, one of the trades that lasted until the advent of automobiles and trucks with steel rims and spokes. The work is owned by Terry & Clark McCullough of Middletown, NJ. Mr. McCullough worked in NY ’ s U.S. District Court before retirement and is the artist ’ s brother.

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No. 80 - 1 “ THE APOTHECARY ” This portrays the Stabler Leadbetter Apothecary in Alexandria, VA existing today as a museum. After studying the fixtures in the present day shop, the artist concluded that they weren ’ t always painted a cream color, and underneath the paint was probably beautiful wood. So, he decided to present the counters and shelves in natural walnut. And, an attempt was made to keep the design of the actual furniture. The pattern of the shop window with the curved glass and that of the leaded window above the door have been retained. The actual front window view of today was replaced by more traditional buildings. The bottles and the experimentation needed to replicate them is the main reason this scene took six years to finish. The problem was solved for future dioramas. Each container is labeled (mostly legibly) with the name or abbreviation of some old herbs, roots, and compounds that were in use way back then. The right side of the counter displays pill cutters, spatulas, and other tools used to prepare the prescribed cure.

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No. 80 - 2 “ The Decoy Carver IV ” This theme has become the most popular of all diorama subjects - especially among those who are duck hunters, carvers, or live on Maryland ’ s Eastern Shore. The ducks include some mallards and canvasbacks in various stages of completion. There are more than 60 decoys in progress. The popularity of the shop overlooking the water is repeated, as are other items the viewers seem to appreciate. Again, this is no certain person ’ s shop. This diorama was owned by Mr. & Mrs. Jesse P. Ware of Oxford, MD and Portsmouth, NH. We have been unable to make contact and the present location is unknown.

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No. 80 - 3 “ Ernie Muehlmatt ’ s Shop ” This diorama portrays the shop of world class carver, Ernie Muehlmatt, who lived in Springfield, PA. In 1979 he placed “ Best in World ” for decorative miniatures and he was third in 1980 ’ s contest for life size carvings. His other awards are significant & numerous. This shop was on the second floor of a building on the family ’ s nursery grounds and for some time Ernie carved and taught carving while working as a floral designer. This scene was made from pictures taken as he was working. The artist took the liberty of bringing in Ernie ’ s dog (with tennis ball) to be in the scene. A few minor details on the back wall were compressed to present a cross-section of all facets of the carver ’ s workplace. On the right hand table is the incomplete carving of the final one that won Ernie his “ Third in World ” in 1980, a screech owl being harassed by two white-throated sparrows. Owned by Ernie Muehlmatt, of Salisbury, MD.

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No. 80 - 4 “ Track Recording Studio ” Control room in Silver Spring, MD where the artist ’ s son, Bill, was the Chief Recording Engineer in the 1980s. The console offers the engineer a selection of over 1500 lights, dials, switches, sliders, buttons, and meters to use as he managed the music being received from many microphones, through amplifiers and other electronics into the 16 track recording machine (shown on right wall) and then back to the musicians ears through headsets, speakers, or both. After the session, 16 tracks are mixed until the best of all performances is preserved and lesser passages are discarded. After the mix, the product is played through the machines at left which had four track, or two track stereo output. The engineer monitored the performers through the studio window where you might see the instruments, stands, mikes, and other gear waiting for the next session. On the left wall was a “ Gold Record ” earned by Track several years earlier. Owned by Bill McCullough of Landenberg, PA, the artists ’ son.

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No. 80 - 5 “ The Lumber Mill ” an old “ up and down saw- mill ” used between the “ pit saw ” and new “ circular saw ” mills. Perhaps it was invented by a pit sawyer - either the one on top who had to pull up the weight of the saw, as well as making a cut - or the poor man down in the pit who worked in semi-darkness, often up to his knees in water, and then got a shower of coarse sawdust with every stroke. Why not use a mill to pull up the saw, and use a weight to pull it down? An interesting aspect other than the saw blades, chains, and a few bolts, everything else was made of wood on the site. If you had a stream with a good flow and acres of trees, you could be in business. From the right window you see the water wheel that ran the mill.. The mill shaft continued across the mill where another bearing was on the foundation under the left wall. A spur gear attached to the main shaft mated with the box gear that turned the winch at left, used to pull the logs into the mill from the mill pond, up the greased ways. Owned by Mrs. Wayne Reimer of Mount Prospect, IL. a retired teacher.

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No. 81 - 1 “ Decoy Carver V ” This version of the carver ’ s workshop incorporates all of the ideas that were developed with the prior shops and adds a bit more detail in the painting of the “ finished ” decoys. Some 72 are in various stages of completion and those on the top three shelves are all done. Wood ducks and buffleheads make their first diorama appearance. Again, this is a mythical scene. This diorama was owned by Dr. and Mrs. Francis Caponegro, Jr. , both deceased, of Garden City, NY. They were both physicians in a urological practice in Garden City, NY. Their son hoped to keep it, but it was disposed of after their death. He is trying to determine the disposition of the piece, but the owner and location are unknown.

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No. 81 - 2 “ The Decoy Carver VI ” This design required a change in case geometry because the illumination control had to be moved to the right side. Some 96 decoys are shown in various stages, and two gulls rest on the copper topped piling outside the door. A crab pot is on the pier, unseen in this photo. The tools of the waterman ’ s trade can be seen - oyster nippers, fishing rod, seine, oars, a skiff - as well as the shotgun and shells . The popular pot-bellied stove is there to burn the chips & shavings, and take the chill off of the bay breeze. The steam rising from the coffee pot tells us the coffee is really getting strong. A long string of Canada geese flying south can be seen from the door and the foliage through the windows has the reds and golds of a Chesapeake autumn. Was owned by Dr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Bering, Jr. of Oxford, MD, a neurosurgeon in Easton, MD. Both are deceased, and is now owned by a grandson Daniel Bering who is currently pursuing an education in London. It will be housed in Watertown MA at his father ’ s house.

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No. 83-1 “ DECOY CARVER VII ” This decoy shop features a door out the right side of the room overlooking a pier with a boat alongside, the shotgun at the door with a group of canvasback working decoys hanging from a peg. Thirty five painted decoys are here with five unpainted, ready for sanding and finishing. and 50 more under construction. Owned by Mr. John P. Cullen, owner of a construction company in Edgerton, WI. He also owns diorama No. 90-4 of a real hunters cabin he built for himself.

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No. 83-2 “ DECOY CARVER VIII ” Again the familiar theme, although a “ ten-plate ” stove is used instead of a pot belly, and no doors are open. Decoy details are improved over previous versions. Purchased by Robert & Joyce Gaw of Columbia MD, now both deceased It is currently the property of daughter, Carol Sweinhart of Suwanee GA. She keeps in close conact with two brothers and shared her CD book with them. The piece won second place in the Popular Vote category in The Plaines, VA and first in Popular Vote at the King George Art Show.

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No. 83-3 “ KASTENS MUSIC SHOP ” A whimsical scene incorporating many personal interests such as a glockenspiel, drum corp insignia, kitten on the hearth, baritone horn & saxophones. The name, Kastens, and musical interests of family members is preserved. Commissioned and enjoyed by Shirley Kastens, of Glenview, IL

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No. 83-4 “ GRACE METHODIST CHURCH, Carlisle PA ” Designed and crafted as a wedding gift by the artist for his Uncle, Dr. R.R. McCullough, portraying his wedding day to Thelma Starnes. Both of them are now deceased. Furnishings are carved of walnut and open grilles sugar pine. Stained glass & candles employ fiber optics techniques. Owned by Esther Ocker, church secretary and friend of Thelma.

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No. 83-5 “ HECHINGER ’ s GEORGIA AVE STORE 1927 ” Recreated from a photo, a copy of a paint label and a photo of the tile floor. It hung in the Chairman ’ s Office and was created for the Hechinger Corporate art collection. At the time it was completed, it was the most detailed and time consuming work attempted. This diorama has been touring the country as part of the Hechinger Art Collection ’ s show “ Tools in Motion ” under the supervision of the International Arts and Artists organization of Washington DC..

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No. 83-6 “ Decoy Carver IX ” A number of duck species are shown in decoy form. It was made for the late Mr. Mort Swimmer, an avid art and gun collector of Owings Mills MD. It is now owned by Conrad Sundeen of Crown Point Indiana. Conrad is now a retiree, but has a stong interest in Wildfowl art and GUNS.

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No.83-7 “ Hunters Cabin II ” Four hunters are found asleep in their cabin after an all-night poker game and a successful dawn in the blind. Their “ limit ” hangs on a tree seen thru the back window, their wet clothes draped over chairs and their retriever naps in front of the fire. Time- about noon. This diorama was originally sold to The Warner Collection of the Gulf Coast Paper Co., Tuscaloosa AL and subsequently it was transferred to The Westervelt Company and is now displayed in the exclusive Westervelt Hunting Lodge in Aliceville AL.

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No. 83-8 “ Ship Chandlery III ” Depicts the nautical activity of the 18th century along the Atlantic seaboard. The goods represent items a ship ’ s captain might need at a quick port stop. The anchor is carved of a single piece of wood, and real back and eye splices are evident. It is owned by daughter Nancy McCullough & Husband Tom Hicks of Wilmington NC.

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No. 83-9 “ TRURO CHURCH ” of Fairfax Virginia. Commissioned by Rector (later Bishop) John Howe to commemorate completion of a large addition to the sanctuary, a church anniversary and a “ burning of the mortgage ” rite. It was later presented to major church contributors, Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Kimel, of McLean VA and Virginia Beach VA. Mr. Kimel is now deceased and it is now the property of Mrs. Kimel.

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No. 83-10 “ DECOY CARVER X ” This and the next were made for exhibition at the Southeast Wild Life Expo at Charleston, SC and the Mid-Atlantic Wild Fowl Festival in Virginia Beach in early 1984. The feature is an extension of new species of ducks added to the carvers repertoire. For Dan Williams, outstanding wild fowl carver, of Dayton TN.

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No. 84-1 “ DECOY CARVER XI ” At least 16 pairs of decoys are represented, and hand painting each was time consuming. It was purchased by the late Dr. Robert Horseman for his son “ Bubba ” of Evans GA. Dr. Horseman was an anesthesiologist. The present owner and location are not known.

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No. 84-2 “ GUNSMITH IV ” This commissioned work was a continuing effort to display the talents and skills of the Pennsylvania Gunsmiths of the 18th century who created firearms of superior quality and accuracy. Here we see typical stonework from the rocky fields in the area and the skill of the mason ’ s art. Owned by gun merchant and expert, Nick Jaqua, grandson of William Jaqua, original owner. it is displayed in Jaqua ’ s Fine Guns in Findlay OH.

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No. 84-3 “ POHICK CHURCH ” An Anglican Church just South of Fort Belvoir VA, dating back to George Washington and George Mason who served on the building committee. Its box pews, raised lectern and an altar with Washington & Mason crests on chair seats face the balcony with an organ and choir loft. This geometry required a deviation from the standard 20x31 inch format, and is the only special sized diorama.

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No. 84-4 “ VIENNA CLOCK SHOP ” A shop of the period up to about 1850. On the left, a bench with jewelers lathe, in the center a gear generator and on the right, a bushing press and jeweler ’ s stake. Clock styles include: Banjo, Beehive, Acorn, Mirror, Spire and Ogee. We have two Tall clocks which we erroneously call “ Grandfather ” clocks. Built for Mr & Mrs Eugene Sobel of Potomac MD.

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No. 84-5 “ DECOY CARVER XII ” Nine finished decoys and dozens in various carving steps indicate an efficient quantity carver. Owned by Mr. Arthur Snyder III, who suceeded his father as President & Chairman of A.M.Best Company, Oldwick NJ a national insurance rating service and original owner of the diorama.

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No.84-6 “ DECOY CARVER XIII ” A larger fishing boat. pin-up calendar with a “ 10 plate stove ” Made for H.P. (Andy) Andrews, Jackson MI. Andy was the CEO of Camshaft Machine Co. and an avid collector and dealer of wildlife art. He and his wife Sandy exhibit much of their art collection on a reqular basis at the Ella Sharp museum in Jackson MI. so this diorama also shares some museum time.

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No. 84-7 “ DECOY CARVER XIV ” Purchased by the late Gaylord Donnelley, Libertyville, IL. Mr. Donnelley was Chairman Emeritus and honorary director of the R.R. Donnelley Printing Co. One of the largest printing companies in the world. It is believed that this diorama is at the family plantation, Ashepoo in SC. Two additional pieces were commissioned and remain in the family, see 87-5 and 88-7.

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No. 84-8 “ DECOY CARVER XV ” Carving bench on right and painting area on left. Note the chopping block in all shops, for the first roughing out of a decoy used to be with a sharp hand axe. Owned by Mr. J. N. Deinlein, Charlottesville, VA. Mr. Deinlein is an attorney and a collector of fine wild fowl / life artworks.

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No. 85-1 “ DECOY CARVER XVI ” Made for Mr. & Mrs. Larry Horseman, Harrington, DE. Friend Larry carved fine birds and worked as a hunting and outdoor guide; wife Eugenia worked for DuPont Corporation.

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No. 85-2 “ DECOY CARVER XVII ” White walls and varied location of benches and cabinets still have all of the details of preceding pieces. See the rod on the ceiling beam and the creel over the right window? Owned by Thomas and Barbara Lott, Washington DC, where he was a commercial office/real estate entrepreneur.

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No. 85-3 “ MOORE ’ S COOPERAGE ” Another early American subject and much more research on barrel making. Bench in foreground is a shaving bench. Out the door, finished barrels are loaded on a wagon for delivery. Beyond that is Charleston Harbor with two sailing ships in view. Built for Mr & Mrs Jackson H. Moore, of Charleston SC, President of Moore ’ s Industrial Drum Corp. It is now owned by his son, Jackson Moore Jr, also a resident of Charleston .

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No. 85-4 “ HUNTER ’ S CABIN III ” Same story: quick & easy dinner, poker game, dawn up, get dressed and out into the blind- get our limit and . . . crash. Owned by Rockwell and Christine O ’ Sheill, Hilton Head SC. He is a retired attorney.

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No. 85-5 “ DECOY CARVER XVIII ” Bought by The Greeley House, home of Horace Greeley, a high quality gift shop, and David & Nancy Swertfager, Chappaqua, NY. It was sold to Mrs. Thomas Zethov of Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510. Owner and diorama locations are now unknown.

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No. 85-6 “ DECOY CARVER XIX ” Sold to: Abercrombie & Fitch of Trump Tower in NYC and bought by Jon & Lin Olphert, of Wellington, and now of Tauranga, New Zealand, its present location.

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No. 85-7 “ DECOY CARVER'S WORKSHOP XX “ Another in the series of these workshops. The background scene shows a more modern power boat taking hunters out to their blind. Do you see the sawdust foot prints in front of the carving bench? Bought by Mrs. Doris M. Burgess, of Toronto, and now owned by her brother Alf Burgess of Scarborough Ontario, Canada.

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No. 85-8 “ DECOY CARVER'S WORKSHOP XXI “ This shop has natural walls and a more modern space heater instead of the usual pot-belly. Bought by Teddy & Cindy Dixon, Charleston, SC. Mr. Dixon was in the construction crane business in Ravenel SC. and they are now very interested in horses .

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No.86-1 “ HUNTERS CABIN IV ” This hunter has a bit more modern kitchen with a four burner stove, although he must still hand-pump his water. Four hunters and their black Lab are enjoying a respite, having been in their blind at daybreak. They got their limit. Originally owned by the late Jack Bailey of Rocky Mount NC. It is now owned by Anne Duncan Weaver, his youngest daughter of Raleigh NC.

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No. 86-2 " BOB KISTLER'S SHOP " This modern basement shop is a place of enjoyment for the owner. He had the scene in his office, so that he could look up from his desk and see where he'd like to be. This was my first attempt at a Shopsmith, radial arm saw, jig saw and a number of the hand tools presented. Commissioned by the late Mr. Robert Kistler, Wayne, PA. It is now owned by daughter, Ellen Kistler Kunkle of Joppa MD.

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No. 86-3 " THE TOY SHOP " This diorama was an experimental scene that entailed a lot of pattern making and casting in clear plastic to achieve a number of minute details. It is a scene of pure whimsy with an illuminated model railroad layout and a couple of illuminated doll houses.

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No. 86-4 "DECOY CARVER XXII" This dark-walled shop with studded walls continues the long line of carvers ’ shops. A hunter and his "Lab" can be seen through the open door on the left, as well as the rowboat of the carver tied to the pier. A few more hand tools are evident than in previous shops. Owned by Fred and Sandra Finfrock, of Longs, SC. Mr. Finfrock was a carver of fine waterfowl.

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No. 86-5 " HUNTER'S CABIN V " This cabin shows the first trophy head in any diorama as well as an easy chair with a napping, sock-footed hunter sitting in front of the fireplace with his Brittany and Pointer to keep him company. A couple of his friends can be seen in the bedroom through the door on the right. The bear rug is also a new feature of this piece. Owned by Paul H. Rothfuss, Winter Springs FL and Eagles Mere PA. He is the Manager of All Play Stable, LLC He also was a radio disc jockey in Baltimore MD (see 87-9)

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No. 87-1 "DECOY CARVER XXIII" This scene was essentially designed by the owner, selecting elements he liked best from a number of photographs of previous dioramas. He decided on the wall colors, orientation of the door, the name of the boat Panache, and most of the other details. This Diorama was bought by Donald Lefton, of Miami, FL, President of The Continental Companies, developers, owners & operators of many fine hotels in the US.

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No. 87-2 "Decoy Carver XXIV" This diorama continues the long line of carvers ’ shops, each much the same, and yet unique. The background shows a quite active hunting season, although the fire in the stove and the steaming coffee indicates that the carver is still at hand. Owned by Mr & Mrs G. Michael Foster of Cockeysville, MD. Mr. Foster is president of MEDCO, (Medical Enterprise Development Co.)

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No. 87-3 "DECOY CARVER XXV" The boat in this scene is the first with a colored hull, indicating a newer fiberglass construction. Other details are similar to previous shops in the same subject. Owned by my friend Donald Fundingsland, Fish Creek, WI. Mr. Fundingsland was a hospital administrator and an excellent bird carver.

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No. 87-4 " SPORTSMAN'S LIVING ROOM " This scene introduces upland game hunting to the diorama world. One can see the opening day of pheasant hunting through the picture window of a sportsman. Owned by Robert Rooch, Austin TX.

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No. 87-5 " DONNELLEY PRESS 1868 " This diorama indicates the artist's impression of what an 1868 press room would look like in Chicago when R.R. Donnelley started the largest printing operation in the world. Every aspect of the printing operation is covered, composing, layout, lockup, proofing and press run is shown. The press itself, is from the Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC. It was commissioned by the late Gaylord Donnelley, was hung in his Residence in Libertyville IL and belongs to the Donnelley Family.

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No. 87-6 " POST OFFICE GENERAL STORE III " This view repeats a theme last used in 1979 which shows the general store in America. Many newer techniques were employed, including computer graphics. Details include addresses on mail in boxes and a tiny mouse watching the scene from his hole in the wall. (Can ’ t be seen in photo). This is the artist ’ s wife ’ s (Louise) favorite diorama. Guess it can ’ t be sold.

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No. 87-7 "POST OFFICE-GENERAL STORE IV." Displaying considerably more computer graphics, this unit explored the possibility of adding far more minute data on the background details. Owners are Dr. (MD) David & Mrs. Jennifer Pomeroy, Samammish WA

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No. 87-8 "DECOY CARVER XXVI" This diorama was created for the 1987 Waterfowl Festival in Easton MD. It incorporated all of the details developed for dioramas of this subject. It was sold to Alan and Nancy Ann Forster , now of Nantucket MA. Mr. Forster was an advertising and marketing executive in Rockefeller Center, and Mrs Forster was with famed Southby Art Sales .

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No. 87-9 "STATION WCAO IN BALTIMORE" Created for a former disc jockey, this scene portrays the place where he worked during the early rock-n-roll era of 1965-1970. The record albums scattered around on the floor represent some of the big hits of that time period and shortly thereafter. Owned by Paul H. Rothfuss, Winter Springs FL and Eagles Mere PA..

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No. 87-10 "DECOY CARVER XXVII" This scene was commissioned by the top executive of the Tidewater Inn, the hotel in Easton MD which is the heart of wildfowl hunting during the season. It hung in the bar lobby of the hostelry where it was seen by many hundreds of people who love hunting and the waterfowl of the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay. When the executive left the hotel, he took the diorama with him. The present owner and location of the diorama are not known.

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No. 88-1 "DECOY CARVER XXVIII" Incorporating all of the facets of previous scenes, this was created for the 1988 Southeast Wildlife Exposition. Owned by Jim and Carolyn Schmidt, of Pawleys Island, SC. Mr. Schmidt was a regional sales manager for a building materials corporation at the time he made this purchase.

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No. 88-2 "DECOY CARVER XXIX" This was created for a couple who resides in the Seattle area, the first of the wildfowl scenes for the west coast area, Norman and Kathy Westby, of Yelm, WA. Mr. Westby was with IBM in customer relations when he made this investment.

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No. 88-3 " DECOY CARVER XXX " Another decoy carver with a door on the back wall. We have goose decoys, and a total of 15 different species of finished decoys. It was purchased by an executive in the steel fabrication business, the late Charles Burrier, and his wife Delores of Timonium, MD. She continues to enjoy this scene.

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No. 88-4 "KISTLER'S GROCERY" Taken from photograph, circa 1900, depicting a Reading PA store owned by the purchaser's grandfather. Computer enhanced graphics permitted finely detailed products on the shelves. Each of the tiny cans feature at least three lines of type, all of which can be read by the viewer. Made for Mr. Robert Kistler, of Wayne, PA It was the second diorama of three he owned. It is now owned by his daughter, Joan Kistler of Chester Springs PA.

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No. 88-5 "DECOY CARVER XXXI" Another decoy carver with a total of 15 different species of finished decoys, silhouette goose decoys and all of the tools used previously. Bought by Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Pingree, Sheldon SC, developers of the Brays Island Plantation Resort. The present owner and location of this diorama is unknown.

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No. 88-6 “ DECOY CARVER XXXII ” A lot of decoys, one sees 19 Completed, 19 ready for finishing and dozens in progress. Through the door you also see a busy sailing harbor. This sold to Dr. and Mrs. Al Kapikian of Rockville MD. He was on the staff of the National Institute of Health, and Catherine, was a director of the center for arts & religion at Wesley Seminary and was a fabric artist doing wall hangings..

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No 88-7 “ DONNELLEY ’ S HOT TYPE ERA ” Commissioned to portray a significant era in the history of the printing business, one sees a linotype and monotype keyboard and casting machines as well as manual type cases and a proof press. It also is part of the RR Donnelley family art collection, and was made under the personal supervision of Gaylord Donnelley who was Honorary Chairman of the Board in the 1980s.

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. No. 89-1 “ KISTLERS LIVING ROOM ” When Bob Kistler received his second commissioned diorama, I asked if his children had put a bid in for them, and didn ’ t he have three children? He thought for just a moment, and said that was a wonderful idea and he would see what “ she ” would like. The reply was that a diorama of Christmas at their home would be always treasured. With a visit and a camera, and a little imagination this is the result. The family home was in Wayne PA. This now belongs to Jane K. Evans of Chester Springs PA.

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No. 89-2 “ DEEP SEA DIVER ’ S LOCKER ” Taking up SCUBA as a sport at age 63 generated an interest in the deeper more hazardous dives well over 100 ft. My mentor, Jon Coon, had done it all, and he helped me understand about the bends, hard hats, umbilicals, lead shoes, and a 600 foot elevator ride to the re-compression tank. Thanks, Jon.

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No. 89-3 “ SCUBA DIVE SHOP ” All the equipment and artifacts included became real reminders of entering into the new world of under-water adventure. It is as exciting as flying your own plane, and if you are careless, it could be equally as hazardous. The enjoyment of group dives with each pair of divers sharing everything they see is a wonderful way to live .

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No. 89-4 “ DECOY CARVER XXXIII ” Would you like to carve some decorative decoys? . . . Here is a place that you could enjoy. It is a pretty well equipped shop with a wonderfull setting on the water. Eighteen finished ducks and two goose silhouettes are waiting for a hunter, or more likely a collector. Owned by Don Wolfsberger of St Louis, MO. The diorama is in his home.

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No. 89-5 “ LEFTON SKI LODGE ” This was commissioned to portray the wide interest in sports enjoyed by the owners. It is the first to be centered in a ski area and the background features scenes of the slopes and snow areas. Can you see gear for skiing, hunting, riding, skating, fishing, back-packing, snow-shoeing, and kayak paddling? Anyone for tennis? Miami ’ s Don Lefton has this to remind him of his Aspen CO Lodge. He also owns a decoy carvers workshop 87-1

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No. 89-6 ” DECOY CARVER XXXIV ” The first run-about is tied up to the pier, but the details are similar to all of the other “ Duck Factories ” . We presume it resides with Mr. and Mrs. Richard H Greene who lived in Phoenix, MD., but the location of the owners and the diorama is still unknown.

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No. 89-7 “ LONG MEADOW LODGE ” The fantasy lodge created for good friend John Cole of Warrenton VA to help recall hunting and fishing adventures in the past. A beagle enjoys the warmth of the fire, and a card game has just been concluded. The next room on the right has his rods, reels, tackle boxes, waders, landing net, creel, and blaze orange vest and cap. Out the window one sees Canada geese, deer, a grey squirrel and ducks rising

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No. 90-1 “ HUNTER ’ S CABIN VI ” This is a very neat and well equipped hunters cabin. The trophies on the walls attest to the expertise of the residents, one of whom will “ have dead arm ” if he doesn ’ t waken soon. Here again, they were in the blind at dawn, got their limit and will continue the poker game after they get back up. Fun? You Bet! Hey- don ’ t forget to feed the dog! Owned by nephew Gary and Joy Heldt of Bay Village, OH.

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No. 90-2 “ DECOY CARVER XXXV ” A typical shop with a mesh crab trap on the pier ignored by the gulls. Sold to the late Mr and Mrs. E. Wallace Lawrence of Keswick, VA. It now resides with their son Glenn and his wife Christine Lawrence in Shelton CT.

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No. 90-3 “ CHATTOOGA CLUB ” One of a kind for me- The wonderful world of big time croquet. This is a close relative of a golf pro-shop, but the sport is Croquet. Here is a dead level manicured lawn with precisely placed cast iron wickets that allow a small fraction of an inch clearance between ball and wicket. The decoy? It slipped in when no one was watching. Commissioned by John & Kathleen Rivers of Charleston SC, it is now in the Chattooga Club located in Cashiers NC.

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No. 90-4 “ HUNTER ’ S CABIN VII ” Now this is class . . . Oil painting over the mantle, stone fireplace, television receiver, solid log walls and artfully placed trophies. Commissioned by John Cullen, Edgerton WI. Mr. Cullen also owns a decoy carvers shop #83-1.

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No. 90-5 “ DECOY CARVER XXXVI ” The last of a series covering the craft of Decoy and Decorative Duck Carving. It has turned into a worldwide carving cult who work many long hours to try to capture the beauty of the game birds. This one encompasses all that I have learned in 18 years of making sawdust and shavings. It ’ s been great. Originally purchased by William and Doris Zimmerman Jr. of Severna Park, MD. It is now owned by son William P Zimmerman IV, CSM USA (ret) also in Severna Park, MD.

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No. 91-1 “ YATES GENERAL STORE ” A typical small town store of the early 20th century in mid-Virginia area. It combines an older structure that grew as new products and fads appeared. The convenience of a local post office with part-time clerks made it affordable to all who needed them. Thus the Yates family of Griffinsburg, VA served their neighbors then, and the family still lives in the area. It was commissioned by Greg Yates, a real estate developer and friend of the artist.

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No. 91-2 “ BOAT BUILDER ’ S SHED ” The last of 110 dioramas over 18 years was commissioned to preserve the Maryland waterman ’ s traditions. This appealed to my interest in fine details, and the chance to make things I ’ d never done before. It was designed and fabricated for David & Marianne Spiegel of McLean, VA.

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IRON FURNACE This is not a diorama in perspective, but a model made to teach visitors what a blast furnace would look like if we could see the interior. The charge of iron ore and coke is shown being wheeled into the top oft the furnace, and the molten iron is tapped out of the bottom into pig molds. The water wheel drove a bellows to increase the heat of the charge to the melting point. I do not know if the model is still in use, nor do I have a record of the size. It was fabricated and delivered about 1979 to Pictured Rocks National Lake Shore Park, Munising, MI. This park was established by NPS in 1966.

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