Mercury & Gemini Recovery Helos

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

Colors and markings of the primary recovery helicopters used in the Mercury and Gemini Manned spaceflight projects.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Project Mercury & Gemini Recovery Helicopters:

Project Mercury & Gemini Recovery Helicopters S-65-61824 © National Geographic MR-1A December 19, 1960 USS Valley Forge (CVS-45) CVSG-56 (AU) HS-3 Tridents HSS-1 HMR(L)-262 (ET) UHS-1 GT-6A December 15-16, 1965 USS Wasp (CVS-18) CVSG-52 (AS) HS-11 Dragon Slayers SH-3A

Project Mercury:

Project Mercury Initially the recovery egress concept was for the astronaut to exit through the parachute compartment as shown below. This was necessitated because the original design of the side entry hatch did not allow for the astronaut to initiate that hatches ’ removal. During spacecraft development, this primary egress was changed with a re-designed side hatch while the parachute compartment egress was kept as a back-up. With the deletion of the of the parachute compartment floatation bags, a different method of stabilizing the spacecraft in the water was needed. The landing impact skirt (to the left) was developed to fulfill this need. After the deployment of the main parachute the heat shield was released which deployed the landing skirt. With the heat shield ’ s contact with the water, the skirt would compress and discharge the air which would soften the overall impact. The skirt would then fill with sea water and stabilize capsule. On the early manned missions, the astronaut ’ s recovery was initiated by the helicopter co-pilot ’ s engagement of the recovery loop with the “ Shepard's crook ” which attached the hoisting cable to the spacecraft. After the helicopter pilot lifted the spacecraft out of the water the astronaut would ‘ blow ’ the side hatch and the co-pilot would lower the “ horse collar ” to remove the astronaut. K. Gatland

HMM-262/HMR(L) - 262:

HMM-262/HMR(L) - 262 Marine Helicopter Transport Squadron 262 (HMM-262) known as the “ Flying Tigers ” was established at Cherry Point, North Carolina in September of 1951 and moved to New River, North Carolina in July of 1954. In December of 1956 they were re-designated Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron Light 262 (HMR(L)-262) and in 1959 one of their assignments was to coordinate with NASA in the recovery efforts for Project Mercury. Using Sikorsky UHS-1 (UH-34D) “ Seahorse ” helicopters, the Flying Tigers participated in all of the early mercury boilerplate and production Spacecraft tests. For the manned Mercury missions that ended in the Atlantic, the prime recovery ships; USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39) (MR-3), USS Randolph (CVS-15) (MR-4 & MA-6) and USS Intrepid (CVS-11) (MA-7) all had elements of HMR(L)-262 assigned as the primary recovery helicopters. Because both MA-6 and 7 under or over-shot their re-entry landing footprints other recovery assets were involved in their recoveries. HMR(L)-262) squadron badge circa 1959

Slide4:

SP-4001 Fig. 41 SP-45 Fig. 16-2 HUS-1 (UH-34D) Seahorse, utility version of the Sikorsky H-34.

Slide5:

G-368 S61-1131 Mercury Redstone -1A (MR-1A) (Unmanned) Prime Recovery Ship USS Valley Forge (CVS - 45) HMR(L) - 262 S61-1144 December 19, 1960

Mercury Redstone - 2 (MR-2) January 31,1961:

Mercury Redstone - 2 (MR-2) January 31,1961 © National Geographic © National Geographic © National Geographic US Navy Prime Recovery Ship - USS Donner Landing Ship Dock (LSD-20) The USS Ellison (D-864) was the closest ship to the landing site. The MR-2 mission included the first chimpanzee to fly into space. Ham (named for Holliman Aerospace School of Medicine) over- shot the intended landing area by 132 miles. Pilot - 1st LT John R. Hellriegel Co-pilot - Lt. George F. Cox

Mercury Redstone - 3 (MR-3) May 5, 1961:

Mercury Redstone - 3 (MR-3) May 5, 1961 Spacecraft Films jsc2004e19882 Note the HS-5 Night Dippers HSS-1N Seabat used as the camera helo for the recovery. Prime Recovery Ship - USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39) CVSG-54 (AT) HUS-1 (UH-34D) BuNo 148767

Mercury Redstone - 4 (MR-4) July 21,1961:

Mercury Redstone - 4 (MR-4) July 21,1961 Spacecraft Films HUS-1 Seahorse, Bu No148755, call sign, “ Hunt Club 1 ” attempted to recover Grissom ’ s flooded spacecraft. Prime Recovery Ship - USS Randolph (CVS-15) CVSG-58 (AV) HUS-1 (UH-34D) BuNo 148755

Slide9:

HUS-1, Bu No 148754, actually recovered Grissom. HUS-1 (UH-34D) BuNo 148754

Mercury Atlas - 6 MA-6) February 21,1962:

Mercury Atlas - 6 MA-6) February 21,1962 Spacecraft Films British Pathe Piasecki UHP-2 Because of the MA-6 re-entry under-shoot (approx. 40 miles) The USS Noa (DD-841) recovered the spacecraft. LtCol Glenn was later flown to the prime recovery ship (the USS Randolph CVS-15) by one of that ship ’ s utility helos from HU-2 (Det. 45) Fleet Angles. Prime Recovery Ship - USS Randolph (CVS-15) CVSG-58 (AV) S62-00922 HUP-2 BuNo 147588

Slide11:

Mercury Atlas - 7 (MA-7) May 24, 1962 62-MA-107 navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv11-63/ Prime Recovery Ship - USS Intrepid (CVS-11) CVSG-56 (AU) Spacecraft Films HUS-1 (UH-34D) primary recovery helicopters from HMR (L)-262 “ Flying Tigers ” Max range approx 180 miles Spacecraft Films

Slide12:

62-MA-107 As the MA-7 mission had overshot the prime recovery area by 250 miles, the US Air Force had offered pick up Carpenter in one of their amphibians. The Navy however, would have none of that and decided to send two HSS-2 (SH-3A) Sea King helicopters from HS-3 off of the prime recovery ship USS Intrepid (CVS-11) to bring him back to the PRS. HSS-2 (SH-3A) BuNo 148964

Slide13:

HSS-2 (SH-3A) HS-3 USS Intrepid (CVS-11) Circa 1961 Carpenter ’ s Recovery SH-3A Bu No 148964 Circa 1965 Tailhook Tailhook

Project Gemini:

Project Gemini Originally the Gemini Spacecraft was designed for both water and land recovery. A flexible lifting device, invented by Francis Rogallo was selected to be included in later Gemini missions. This paragliger concept, when combined with three skids mounted to the crew compartment would have allowed for a dry lake bed landing. This method of recovery was never deployed operationally. McDonnell Aircraft Via M. Mckowski McDonnell Aircraft Via M. Mckowski © National Geographic 62-Gemini-4

Slide15:

Because of the tandem seating arraignment in the Gemini spacecraft, a two point suspension system was developed for the final phase of the spacecraft ’ s descent to the ocean. Astronaut recovery relied on a floatation collar to stabilize the vehicle in the water and either a ship or helicopter pick-up was utilized for pick-up. GT-8 ’ s emergency recovery in the Western Pacific Ocean. 66-H-322

Gemini Titan - 2 (GT-2) January 19, 1965 :

Gemini Titan - 2 (GT-2) January 19, 1965 Prime Recovery Ship - USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39) CVSG-54 (AT) HS-5 “ Night Dippers ” NH97442 (Unmanned)

Gemini Titan - 3 (GT-3) March 23, 1965:

Gemini Titan - 3 (GT-3) March 23, 1965 Spacecraft Films Spacecraft Films Prime Recovery Ship - USS Intrepid (CVS-11) CVSG-56 (AU) HS-3 “ Tridents ” US Navy SH-3A- BuNo 148984

Slide18:

Spacecraft Films S-65-29688 Gemini Titan - 4 (GT-IV) June 3-7, 1965 Prime Recovery Ship - USS Wasp (CVS-18) CVSG-52 (AS) HS-11 “ Subseekers ” SH-3A BuNo 148999

Slide19:

British Pathe 65-H-955

Slide20:

USS Wasp - Mediterranean Cruise - Winter of 1964 navysite.de/cruisebooks/cv18-64/

USS Hornet Museum:

USS Hornet Museum SH-3A, Bu No 148999, was modified into a SH-3H in November of 1975 and after more than 13,000 total flight hours her last “ mission ” was as “ 66 ” in the Ron Howard production of “ Apollo 13 ” She was retired to the 309 Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (309 AMARG) adjacent to the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona on December 9, 1994. After more than ten years baking in the desert sun, she was placed on permanent loan from the National Museum of Naval Aviation to the USS Hornet Museum. T. Deohring

Gemini Titan - 5 (GT-V) August 21-29, 1965:

Gemini Titan - 5 (GT-V) August 21-29, 1965 S65-45292 S65-51654 S-65-45288 Prime Recovery Ship - USS Lake Champlain (CVS-11) CVSG-55 (AT) HS-5 “ Night Dippers ” SH-3A BuNo 149005

Gemini Titan - 7 (GT-VII) December 4-18, 1965:

Gemini Titan - 7 (GT-VII) December 4-18, 1965 Prime Recovery Ship - USS Wasp (CVS-18) CVSG-52 (AS) HS-11 “ Dragon Slayers ” S65-61828 SH-3A BuNo 149006

Slide24:

This is how she looked in 2006. SH-3A BuNo 149006 was converted to a SH-3H (date unknown) and then to a UH-3H (date also unknown). Late in her career, 149006 flew S&R at NAS Whidbey Island, WA. S65-63646 R. Smith D. Ledniger

Slide25:

Courtesy of S. Bailey In 2006, UH-3H, BuNo149006, was delivered to the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum in McMinnville, Oregon. This how she looked when put on display there. Courtesy of S. Bailey Courtesy of S. Bailey

Gemini Titan - 10 (GT-X) July 18-21, 1966:

Gemini Titan - 10 (GT-X) July 18-21, 1966 Prime Recovery Ship - USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) HS-3 “ Tridents ” (DET) D. Blair D. Blair Spacecraft Films SH-3A BuNo 152134

Gemini Titan - 11 (GT-XI) September 12-15, 1966:

Gemini Titan - 11 (GT-XI) September 12-15, 1966 Prime Recovery Ship - USS Guam (LPH-9) HS-3 “ Tridents ” (DET) Spacecraft Films SH-3A BuNo 152134

Gemini Titan - 12 (GT-XII) November 11-15, 1966:

Gemini Titan - 12 (GT-XII) November 11-15, 1966 Spacecraft Films Spacecraft Films Prime Recovery Ship - USS Wasp (CVS-18) CVSG -52 (AS) HS-11 “ Dragon Slayers ” SH-3A BuNo 151556

Slide29:

151556 now resides at the American Helicopter Museum, West Chester, PA SH-3A, BuNo 151556 was converted to a HH-3A (date unknown). A. Sherbert S-65-59984 B. Maloney B. Maloney

AS-501(Apollo 4) USS Bennington (CVS-20) CVSG-59 (NT) November 9, 1967:

AS-501(Apollo 4) USS Bennington (CVS-20) CVSG-59 (NT) November 9, 1967 HS-8 “ Eightballers ” , Pilot CMDR Massa S. Hirschfield The Beginnings of the Apollo Program

Manned Mercury & Gemini Recovery Helicopters:

Manned Mercury & Gemini Recovery Helicopters MR-3, May 5, 1961, HUS-1 (UH-34D) Bu No 148767 Marine Helicopter Transport Squadron HMR(L)-262 Flying Tigers, “ 44-ET ” USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). MR-4, July 21, 1961, HUS-1 (UH-34D) Bu No 148755 Marine Helicopter Transport Squadron HMR(L)-262 Flying Tigers, “ 32-ET ” (Primary). HUS-1 (UH-34D) Bu No 148754 “ 30-ET ” (Backup), USS Randolph (CVS-15). MA-6 February 21, 1961, UHP-1, “ 46-HU ” , USS Randolph (CVS-15). MA-7, May 24, 1962, HSS-2 (SH-3A) Bu No 148964, HS-3 Tridents, “ 61-AU ” , USS Intrepid (CVS-11), (CVSG-56). GT-3, March 23, 1965, SH-3A Bu No 148985, HS-3 Tridents, “ 57-AU ” , USS Intrepid (CVS-11), (CVSG-56). GT-VIa, December 15-16, 1965, USS Wasp (CVS-11) (CVSG-52). Crew remained in S/C & PRS picked them up. GT-VII, December 4-18, 1965, HS-3A Bu No 149006, HS-11 Dragon Slayers, “ 56-AS ” USS Wasp (CVS-11) (CVSG-52). GT-VIII March 16, 1966 After an early mission abort, the crew was picked up by the USS Leonard F Mason (DD-852). GT-IXa, June 3-6, 1966 SH-3A Bu No 149725 HS-11 Dragon Slayers, #61-AS ” USS Wasp (CVS-11) (CVSG-52). “ #61-AS ” did not pick up crew, they remained in the S/C & USS Wasp picked them up. GT-X, July 18-21, 1966, SH-3A Bu No 152134, HS-3 Tridents, “ 63-AT ” USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) (CVSG-54). GT-XI, September 12-15, 1966, SH-3A Bu No 152134, HS-3 Tridents, “ 63-AU ” USS Guam (LPH-9) (CVSG-56). GT-XII November 11-15, 1966, SH-3A Bu No 151556 HS-11 Dragon Slayers, ” 66-AS ” USS Wasp (CVS-11) (CVSG-52).

authorStream Live Help