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Carmel Jarvis U1023539 EDX3270 Assignment 1 Due 19 th August 2011

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Annotations

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Strong , G. (2007, Oct 02). Has txt kild the ritn wd , The Age , (October), 1-2 In this article, Geoff Strong brings our attention to the fact that modern technologies are introducing ‘SMS speak’ into the everyday English language. He explains that children are used to seeing a coded form of the English language, using terms such as ‘LOL’ and ‘OMG’ in their everyday spoken English. Strong states that the English language is constantly soaking up other linguistic and cultural influences and as a result, this form of coded English will strongly affect the way children learn and understand multiliteracies that are taught in the classroom.

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Poulter , S. (2008, Jan 11). Smarter games dumber children, The Courier-Mail , 12. According to Poulter’s article, ‘Children should be banned from playing computer games until the age of 7 because the technology is ‘re-wiring’ their brains’. Poulter goes on to state that the age that US children are starting to use electronic gadgets is falling dramatically, and that the majority of ‘educational’ games are in fact not educational at all. Poulter’s article draws attention to that fact that educators need to accept the increase of technology rather than reject it, and be aware of the technologies available to children when preparing to teach multiliteracies in the classroom.

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Anstey , M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies : changing times changing literacies (pp. 56-81). Newark, DEL: International Reading Association. Anstey and Bull illustrate the importance of the use of a dynamic pedagogy in order to create a multiliterate person. Teachers need to have a pedagogy that is dynamic rather than static, as literacy is always changing as a result of social, cultural and dynamic change. In order for teachers to create students who are able to engage in high order thinking, using deep knowledge and understandings in new and different ways, they need to have a balanced and dynamic pedagogical approach to multiliteracies.

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Henderson , R. (2004). Recognising difference : One of the challenges of using a multiliteracies approach?. Practically Primary , 9 (2), 11-14. Retrieved from A+ Education database. In this article, Henderson discusses the effects of diversity on literacy teaching, and the importance of recognizing diversity in the classroom. In order for children to understand and comprehend the learning of multiliteracies, it is important that cultural and linguistic diversity is considered when lessons are being planned. Henderson believes that identifying children’s differences and strengths are vital when teaching multiliteracies and that teachers should build on student’s strengths, and what they can do. For teachers to be able to build on student strengths, it is important that they first recognize them.

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Santoro , N. (2004). Using the four resources model across the curriculum. In A. Healy, & E. Honan (Eds.), Text next : new resources for literacy learning (pp. 51-67). Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association. Santoro explains the importance of using the four resources model as a framework across all subjects. He illustrates that literacy spans across all subjects, and can be interpreted differently in each one. Santoro explains the importance of developing students as code breakers, text participants, text users and text analysts in the early years of teaching, in order for them to use their knowledge and skills appropriately across all subjects in the later years. In order for teachers to develop multiliterate students, they must use key concepts from the four resources model as a framework for their teaching.

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Luke , A., & Freebody, P. (1999). Further notes on the four resources model. Reading Online , 1-20. from http://www.readingonline.org/past/past_index.asp?HREF=/research/lukefreebody.html . Luke and Freebody talk about the effect of society and culture on literacy. When they created the four resources model, there was not one method on its own that was working in regards to teaching literacy, so they came up with a range of practices that would help effective teaching of multiliteracies. These practices will not work separately; they need to be considered as a family of dynamic practices that are constantly changing to suit society. Luke and Freebody suggest that teachers need to be aware of the constant change of society, and use the four resources model to shape and construct multiliterate students.

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Anstey , M. (2002). More than cracking the code: Post modern picture books and new literacies. In G. Bull, & M. Anstey (Eds.), Crossing the boundaries (pp. 87-105). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia. Anstey discusses how one set of social and literacy skills are no longer effective to participate fully in today’s society. The term literacy is no longer appropriate when teaching because of the constant change in society, culture and technology. The term multiliteracies indicates that the way that literacy has previously been taught needs to change. In order for teachers to change the way they teach, so that they create multiliterate students, they need to use the four resources model as a base for their pedagogy of multiliteracies.

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The New London Group (1996). A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review , 66(1), 60-92, Retrieved 7 th August 2011 from http://wwwstatic.kern.org/filer/blogWrite44ManilaWebsite/paul/articles/A_Pedagogy_of_Multiliteracies_Designing_Social_Futures.htm The New London Group came up with the term ‘multiliteracies’ and breaks down literacy pedagogy into two sections, the what and the how. The ‘what’ includes six design elements and they focus on these, implying that every text is a design, and that when we create texts we are the designers. They then convert the ‘what’ into the ‘how – Situated Practice, Overt Instruction, Critical Framing and Transformed Practice. The New London Group suggests that a multiliteracies approach to pedagogy will enable students to participate fully in all aspects of a modern society. As teachers, we need to ensure that differences in culture, language and gender are not barriers to our student’s educational success.

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Mills, Kathy A. (2009) Multiliteracies : interrogating competing discourses. Language and Education: An International Journal, 23(2). pp. 103‐116, Retrieved 7 th August 2011 from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/14973/1/c14973.pdf Mills argues that a pedagogy of multiliteracies is a way of including modern technologies, as well as social and cultural diversity into literacy teaching. She describes the need for literacy pedagogy to respond to the constant changes in technology, society and culture. Mills emphasizes that although the teaching of multiliteracies is important, it is also important that teachers do not replace classic English literature with abbreviated forms of electronic communication. Mills explains that although there were mixed reactions to The New London Group’s pedagogy of multiliteracies, it is generally agreed that as technology advances, the way in which literacy is taught needs to advance also.

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Stevens, V. (2005). Multiliteracies for Collaborative Learning Environments. TESL-EJ Teaching English as a Secord or Foreign Language, 9(3), 1-4, Retrieved 7 th August 2011 from https://tesl-ej.org/~teslejor/ej34/int.html Stevens states that a pedagogy of multiliteracies focuses on modes of representation much broader then language alone. Students and teachers have to keep up with advances in technology and a constantly changing society. It is crucial for teachers to understand the ways in which technology affects the personal and academic lives of their students. Stevens touches on connectivism as a learning theory for which teachers should use in their pedagogy of multiliteracies. Stevens emphasises the fact that literacy is no longer limited to reading and writing print text, and as technology increases, so should the teaching of multiliteracies.

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Overview

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The articles and chapters that I selected for this presentation all show the link between multiliteracies and a constantly changing society. The New London Group(1996) suggest that as technology advances and society changes, we need to change the way that literacy is taught, therefore creating a pedagogy of multiliteracies. Luke and Freebody’s (1990) Four Resources Model illustrates the fact that all children have diverse learning needs. They state that in order to create multiliterate students, teachers need to use key concepts from the Four Resources Model for the framework of their pedagogy of multiliteracies. Together, The New London Group’s (1996) pedagogy of multiliteracies and Luke and Freebody’s (1990) Four Resources Model create a framework for teachers to construct and shape informed, analytical, multiliterate students. As Santoro(2004) explains, the use of literacy spans across all subjects, so it is essential to develop students as code breakers, text participants, text users and text analysts from an early age. In order to create multiliterate students, it is important for teachers to understand the way in which technology affects their student’s academic and personal lives. Teachers need to have a good understanding of modern technology, in order to create a successful pedagogy of multiliteracies. The New London Group (1996) states that teachers need to ensure that differences in culture, language and gender are not barriers to our student’s educational success.

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Advances in technology have created a constantly changing society, and as modern technology becomes more common, the way in which literacy is taught changes dramatically. Although some educators prefer to stick to more traditional teaching of literacy, it is inevitable that all teachers will need to change the way they teach multiliteracies to incorporate factors of our ever changing world and its technologies. Overall, this collection of articles/books illustrates the fact that literacy is no longer simply reading or writing print text. In order to be considered multiliterate in society, students must be able to use and participate in a large variety of textual practices. Teachers must understand the importance of multiliteracies, and effectively implement a number of different frameworks within their teaching this to create informed, analytical, multiliterate students. The End

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