ESL - 1 -Expressing your opinion vocabulary and topics

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ESL - part 1 of a 3 part lesson series on effective communication pt1 Expressing opinion, pt2 Supporting opinion, pt3 Delivering opinion

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Expressing your opinion:

Expressing your opinion Effective Communication

PowerPoint Presentation:

The next few slides is my READ ME to you. Some advice to you on how I delivered the lesson successfully. Following the READ ME and using the . ppt as is should give you a good start on helping your students grasp the phrases and language we use to when we express our opinions.

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Ask an English teacher to help you procure some scrap paper and cut the paper into thirds. Students need to write for this lesson and not all students have scrap paper readily available. My experience: some classes 2 students take paper from me and other classes 30 students want my scrap paper. Be prepared! While I am waiting for class to start I write the key words on the board with Chinese . I ask a student for their dictionary, look up the words and get the student to write the Chinese on the board. Then copy the words and their Chinese onto a piece of paper for later classes. It looks just like this, certain words to the left and right. Debate – (Chinese) Logically – Engage – Convincing – Argumentation - Specific – Persuasive – Banned - It will help if you open the . ppt and look at it as you read through the steps below: I go through the ppt and as the difficult words come up, I point out the words on the board and have them chant/repeat the words after me. First slide is just asking some simple questions to get them talking and their attention. Second slide is me explaining about the purpose of this lesson and the repeat after me/ learning some new words. (Left side words.) Third slide is the 4 things that make a strong argument . (Right side words.)

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Fourth slide I show the example topic, “ Smoking should be banned in public places. ” (point to the word “banned” written on the board for their reference to its meaning) Before I show them any of my answers I let them read the topic sentence then I ask, “What do you think?” For every class so far, students have yelled out words agreeing or disagreeing… Then I explain that this exercise is to practice their argumentation skills so , for this class, their opinion doesn’t matter. What matters is trying to think of not only reasons “for” but also “against” and/or vise-versa. We are trying to build their argumentation and persuasive skills. (Again I point to the words on the board) Then I show my answers. 3 for the affirmative and 3 for the negative. Reading them out loud a I go. Then I ask the class, “On the affirmative side, which answer meets the 4 things that make a strong argument? (NOTE: it’s the last one, “ Secondhand smoke is harmful for nonsmokers ” ) Again I point to the board, the right side this time and I say again the four key points to a strong argument. “ 1. On topic. 2. Logical. 3… etc ” I have had mixed results at this point, some classes are able to see it and others aren’t. But then I explain that the last one is the only one that meets the four requirements: It’s on topic, logical, convincing and specific. Then I ask, “Which one is the least specific, on topic, etc..” Then I advance the ppt so the red “x” comes up over the second answer, “ It’s bad.” This answer does not meet the four requirements. The first option, “ It gives people bad breath and makes their teeth yellow.” Is close but it doesn’t meet the first criteria. It is not on topic as it is more of a personal reason not to smoke rather than an opinion on the topic “ Smoking should be banned in public places .”

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Then I do it all again with the negative side. I reverse the questions though. I ask them, “Which of the answers is the least convincing ?” And then I advance the slide and the red “X” comes up over the first reason. I ask, “Which answer is the most logical and specific?” and it’s the second reason. The third reason, “ Nobody cares if a stranger is smoking.” Isn’t convincing because to most nonsmokers , the smoke coming from a smoker is disgusting and it makes us wish they weren’t doing it, there-by, we do care if they are smoking around us in public . It reads and looks like a lot but by this time I am usually 15-20 min into the class Fifth slide – I advance the ppt to the next slide and next topic. I let them read it and digest the idea. Thus far students immediately start voicing their opinion regarding the topic.  I ask them to give me some reasons for the affirmative and negative. Sensitively and remaining friendly, occasionally I correct a student who says something worth exploring or pointing out the 4 criteria in a strong argument. Then advance to the sixth slide and go over my reasons - affirmative and negative. By now you should be at the 25-30 min mark in class. Seventh and Eighth slide – I ask them to try their best to come up with reasons for both sides. Again I reiterate that we are trying to practice and build their argumentation skill s. I give them 3-5 min to write, depending on the class ability. As they are writing I walk around class reading what they have and try to get a feel for who will be good to ask to read out their answers when they are finished.

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After it seems most have finished, then I ask for a volunteer to read out his or her reasons “for” or “against”. I ask for one reason why they think yes, “Love IS important that money and one reason why no, “Love IS NOT more important than money. I have had mixed results. Some classes the end of class bell rings and I still have students who want to voice what they’ve written. And then some classes… no volunteers… like pulling teeth… If you get no volunteers: OPTION ONE – One at a time, pick/point out a student (you noted earlier when you were walking around the class) who had good answers. Between each one, continue asking for volunteers. Sometimes they are slow to start but then they see it’s not so bad and you’ll start to get volunteers. Spend the remainder of class time listening to what they have to say. OPTION TWO – (Takes a little more time between readers) I ask, “Who is the class monitor?” The monitor will stand up and I ask them, “What’s your favourite number?” They say, “8” for example, I count out eight students from where the monitor is standing and that is the student who will begin and read out one reason “for” and one reason “against”. Then again I ask for a volunteer. If no body volunteers then I ask the student who just read out her/his reasons to tell me a number. And again I count out students and whoever I finish counting on, that is who reads next. REPEAT.

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At the end of class, I finish by writing the next topic on the board: TOPIC: Women should quit their jobs if they get married. I tell them this is just one of the topics for next time and to use this time between classes to think of reasons “affirmative” and “negative.” I look forward to hearing their opinions!

Expressing your opinion:

Expressing your opinion Effective Communication

Vocabulary:

Vocabulary Debate – Engages – Argumentation – Persuasive – Banned – Logically – Convincing – Specific-

Introduction:

Introduction Do you feel comfortable using English? Are you better at writing or speaking? Approximately how many English articles have you written this year? How many English speeches have you given this year? Do you feel comfortable expressing your opinion using only English?

Having a Debate:

Having a Debate Why debate? Debate is an excellent activity for language learning because it engages students in a variety ways : provides meaningful listening, writing and speaking practice e xercises and develops all English skills debate is also highly effective for developing argumentation skills for persuasive speech and writing.

PowerPoint Presentation:

It is on topic. It logically supports your opinion. It is specific and states the idea clearly. It is convincing to a majority of people. Strong reasons VS. Weak reasons A strong argument =

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DEBATE TOPIC: Smoking should be banned in public places. Affirmative : agrees with the topic Negative: disagrees with the topic It gives people bad breath and makes their teeth yellow. Second hand smoke is harmful for non-smokers. It’s bad. Nobody cares if a stranger is smoking. People should be allowed to do what they want. If you don’t like it, walk away. Smoking doesn’t cause problems.

PowerPoint Presentation:

A strong argument = It is on topic It logically supports your opinion It is specific and states the idea clearly It is convincing to a majority of people DEBATE TOPIC: SCHOOL UNIFORMS ARE GOOD FOR STUDENTS. Affirmative: (At least 2 reasons for) Negative: (At least 2 reasons against)

DEBATE TOPIC: SCHOOL UNIFORMS ARE GOOD FOR STUDENTS.:

DEBATE TOPIC: SCHOOL UNIFORMS ARE GOOD FOR STUDENTS. Everyone looks the same: not judged by the clothes they are wearing Bullying ( 欺凌 ) can happen to students for their choice in the clothing they wear Save time and money: new clothes and latest fashions Save other clothes not worn everyday to school If something bad happens the student can be identified by their school name Everyone looks the same: no individuality, freedom or creativity or identity Bullying ( 欺凌 ) still happens to students who wear uniforms School uniforms are ugly and unfashionable They are uncomfortable and don’t fit your body; unflattering Don’t care about name brands; school uniforms are more expensive than normal clothes Affirmative: Negative:

Please, find something to write on :

Please, find something to write on

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DEBATE TOPIC: LOVE IS MORE IMPRORTANT THAN MONEY Affirmative: Negative: A strong argument = It is on topic It logically supports your opinion It is specific and states the idea clearly It is convincing to a majority of people

Thank You !:

Thank You !

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