Ergonomic selection of power hand tools

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Presentation Description

preventing injury through proper power tool selection and use

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By: dstrebel (155 month(s) ago)

Lot's of good information on tooling selection process. Could be more examples of ergonomic designed hand tools.

Presentation Transcript

A Guide to Selecting Non-Powered Hand Tools : 

A Guide to Selecting Non-Powered Hand Tools Ergonomics Design Guidelines to prevent WMSDs

What YOU as a worker will learn in this slideshow : 

What YOU as a worker will learn in this slideshow Select or purchase the best available ergonomically designed non-powered hand tool. Follow 4 Steps to help you in selecting/purchasing a better hand tool: Know your job Look at your work space Improve your work posture Review the “Tips for Selecting Hand Tools” and then Select the Tool. A. D. C. B.

Importance in your work environment : 

Importance in your work environment “Non-powered hand tools are widely used in a variety of industries including construction, manufacturing and agriculture.”

Importance in Your work environment : 

Importance in Your work environment “To the untrained eye it may be difficult to evaluate tools from an ergonomics point of view.” “The purpose of this slideshow is to help employers and workers identify non-powered tools that are less likely to cause injury –those that can be used effectively with less force, less repeated movement and less awkward positioning of the body and body parts.”

Is there a Problem? : 

Is there a Problem? “A large number of injuries known as musculoskeletal disorders are attributable to hand tool use in occupational settings, resulting in unnecessary suffering, lost workdays and economic costs.”

The best Work Place tool is one that… : 

The best Work Place tool is one that… Fits the job you are doing at your company/jobsite Fits the work space available Reduces the force you need to apply Fits your hand Can be used in a comfortable work position It is safe in all aspects

WMSD hazardous exposures : 

WMSD hazardous exposures Awkward postures Postures that strain the neck, shoulders, elbows, wrists or back. Also, bending, stooping, twisting and reaching.

WMSD hazardous exposures : 

WMSD hazardous exposures Contact pressure Pressure from a hard surface, point, or edge on any part of the body.

WMSD hazardous exposures : 

WMSD hazardous exposures Power Grip The hand grip that provides maximum hand power for high force tasks. All the fingers wrap around the handle.

WMSD hazardous exposures : 

WMSD hazardous exposures Pinch Grip The hand grip that provides control for precision and accuracy. The tool is gripped between the thumb and the fingertips.

Know your work place job : 

Know your work place job Think about the job you will be doing at jobsite/company. Tools are designed for specific purposes A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position Cutting, pinching gripping tools: pliers snips cutters A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position Striking tools Hammers Mallets A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position Driving tools Screwdrivers Hand wrenches Nut drivers T-handle wrenches A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position Struck or hammered tools Punches Chisels Nail sets A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position For POWER tasks consider: Single-handle tools with a handle diameter 1 ¼ inches to 2 inches A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position For POWER tasks consider: OPEN GRIP SPAN not more than 3 ½ inches CLOSED GRIP SPAN not less than 2 inches A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position For PRECISION tasks consider: Single-handle tools with handle diameter ¼ to ½ inch. A.

Know your job position : 

Know your job position For PRECISION tasks consider: OPEN GRIP SPAN not more than 3 inches CLOSED GRIP SPAN not less than 1 inch A.

Look at your jobsite work space : 

Look at your jobsite work space Awkward postures may cause you to use more force. Select a tool that can be used within the space available B.

Look at your jobsite work space : 

Look at your jobsite work space Awkward postures may cause you to use more force. If you work in a cramped space it is better to use a shorter tool that fits within the work space. B.

Improve your work posture : 

Improve your work posture Awkward body postures make more demands on your body C.

Improve your work posture : 

Improve your work posture The placement of the work piece will affect your postures in the: Shoulder Elbow Wrist Hand Back C.

Improve your work posture : 

Improve your work posture Choose a tool that requires less continuous force and awkward postures. The right tool will not cause pain and fatigue, because your body parts will be relaxed. C.

Work Place Design guidelines : 

Work Place Design guidelines These guidelines were developed by OSHA and NIOSH. The more guidelines you apply to hand tool selection, the safer and healthier for you and all PHCC employees.

Select the correct work place tool : 

Select the correct work place tool Single-handle tools for POWER tasks: Tool must feel comfortable with a handle diameter 1 ¼ inches to 2 inches. C. You may increase the diameter by adding a sleeve to the handle

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Single-handle tools for PRECISION tasks: Tool must feel comfortable with a handle diameter ¼ inch to ½ inch. C.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Double-handle tools (pliers-like) for POWER tasks: Tool with a grip span at least 2 inches when fully closed and no more than 3 ½ inches when fully open. C. When continuous force is required, consider using a clamp, a grip or locking

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Double-handle work tools (pliers-like) for PRECISION tasks: Tool with a grip span that is not less than 1 inch when fully closed and no more than 3 inches when fully open. C.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Double-handled pinching, gripping or cutting tools: Handles spring-loaded to return the handles to the open position. C.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Select a tool without sharp edges or finger grooves on the handle. C.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Select a tool that is coated with soft material. C. Adding a sleeve to the tool handle pads the surface but also increases the diameter of the grip span of the handle.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Select a tool with an angle that allows you to work with a straight wrist. C. Tools with bent handles are better when the force is applied horizontally (same direction as your straight forearm and wrist)

Select the tool : 

Select the tool Select a tool with an angle that allows you to work with a straight wrist. C. Tools with straight handles are better when the force is applied vertically.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Select a tool that can be used with your dominant hand or with either hand. C.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool For HIGH FORCE tasks: Select a tool with a handle length longer than the widest part of your hand – usually 4 inches to 6 inches C. Make sure the end of the handle does not press on the palm of your hand.

Select the correct work tool : 

Select the correct work tool Select a work tool with handles that have a non-slip surface for a better grip. C. Adding a sleeve improves the surface texture of the handle. Make the sleeve fit snugly during use.

The Work Tool Checklist : 

The Work Tool Checklist Use BOTH sides of the checklist to compare similar tools. For example if you have two pliers and want to select the best of the two, compare each tool against the features on the checklist. The more “Yes” answers the tool has, the better the tool.

Not following these guidelines may result in one or more of these symptoms: : 

Not following these guidelines may result in one or more of these symptoms: Tingling Swelling in the joints Decreased ability to move Decreased grip strength Pain from movement, pressure or exposure to cold or vibration Continual muscle fatigue Sore muscles Numbness Change in the skin color of your hands and fingertips

The Work Ergonomics Cycle : 

The Work Ergonomics Cycle The ergonomics cycle provides with an organized way to start YOUR work ergonomics effort at a store.

The Work Ergonomics Cycle : 

The Work Ergonomics Cycle

More Work Place resources : 

More Work Place resources Easy Ergonomics: A Guide to Selecting Non-Powered Hand Tools Easy Ergonomics. A practical approach for improving the workplace www.cbs.state.or.us/osha/pdf/pubs/3347.pdf On WMSD hazardous exposures visit the OSHA webpage at:www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Topics/Ergonomics Example accident prevention program : www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Basics/Programs/Accident Ideas to reduce hazardous exposures can be found at the Ergonomics Ideas Bank

Thank you for participating My Safety Training Online. Com : 

Thank you for participating My Safety Training Online. Com Questions??? Comments??? Leave a e-mail for Ralph at dahboogieman1@yahoo.com

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