InDesign_Review

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InDesign Fundamentals:

A Review of InDesign InDesign Fundamentals

Objectives (1 of 2):

Objectives (1 of 2) Learn procedures to set up preferences for special settings with InDesign documents before bringing in graphic and text objects. Layout guidelines for accuracy of placement of text and graphics. Place graphics and format type characters and frames using the Control panel and InDesign menus. Format spacing within a text frame and vertical alignment using the Text Frame Options dialog box. Apply color to selected type and stroke of frames. Save as the original document and as a template for future editing. Advanced: Preflight, packaging, and printing the final document for press.

Objectives (2 of 2):

Objectives (2 of 2) Learn procedures to set up multipage InDesign documents for importing text and graphics. Set up a master page as a template for layout and design consistency. Navigate and edit document using the Pages panel. Apply stroke and fill techniques for Pantone colors ready for press. Import text into multiple columns and multiple pages, creating jump lines into multiple pages. Create precise alignment columns using tabs. Apply special formatting techniques for headlines, body text, drop caps, rules, and pull quotes. Advanced: Align text to a baseline grid and automate repetitive tasks using character and paragraph styles and object libraries .

InDesign in Desktop Publishing:

InDesign in Desktop Publishing InDesign is a high-end desktop publishing program used in today’s print industry. Desktop publishing programs allow designers to bring in text and graphic objects or elements from other applications and assemble and lay out these items accurately inside boxes that it calls frames in an organized manner. InDesign is used to create and prepare documents and books for commercial printing, interactive media, or for web use. InDesign documents saved for printing have normally an INDD extension to identify them .

The InDesign Environment:

The InDesign Environment

Word Processing vs. Desktop Publishing:

Word Processing vs. Desktop Publishing To create documents of formatted text for reports, short articles, or single-page documents with fixed inserted graphics, a word processing program works best. This is suitable for home or office use, not for commercial press. For printing on a commercial press, desktop publishing involves placing items from a more diverse group of source applications into either text or picture boxes called “frames” in InDesign. These boxes serve as “containers” for items that can be easily resized, repositioned, reshaped, combined, or linked to other text boxes on other pages. Desktop publishing provides a place to lay out and reposition items, edit, and format contents in a more controlled workspace ready for publishing .

Measuring with Inches and Points:

Measuring with Inches and Points Desktop publishing and word processing programs use points as a default measurement for sizing type fonts and spacing between characters and lines of type. Although most designers lay out text and graphic items using fractions and inches as standards of measurement, font sizes and spacing are measured in points. Where 72 points is the equivalent of one inch and 36 points equals one-half inch, you can see why using points is a more precise method of measuring for those smaller measurements.

InDesign Tools:

InDesign Tools The InDesign Tools panel is designed with various tools to create text and picture boxes and paths, link and unlink text boxes, and zoom, rotate, and cut items. In InDesign, as with any desktop publishing program, you must create either a text box, picture box, or path before placing text or images in the document. Tools with a small black triangle display other tools when held down with the mouse.

InDesign Tools Panel:

InDesign Tools Panel

Creating Frames:

Creating Frames With InDesign, as with any desktop publishing program, the designer creates a text box, picture box, or path before placing text or images in the document. InDesign uses frames as the containers for type and graphics follow.

How to Use Frames:

How to Use Frames You can select the Type tool and diagonally drag a frame to start typing inside. Text and graphics can be put in either container, frame, or shape. The Frame tools display a nonprinting X inside the shape. In the graphics industry, a box with an “X” inside has traditionally been used to show the location of an image. The empty frames created by the Rectangle, Ellipse, and Polygon shape tools are generally used for text inserts, although with InDesign, both containers can be used for type or graphics. Understanding where to place type (empty container) and graphics (container with an X) can help with your work flow by communicating specific elements to team members.

Displaying or Docking Panels (1 of 2):

Displaying or Docking Panels (1 of 2) For the convenience of providing additional space on your desktop, InDesign displays its panels as tabs, which you can click to expand or make active from the side as needed, then click again to contract when you are done, as has been done with the rest of the CS suite of applications. Sometimes when you click on a panel, it will be grouped with others for convenience. You can select a panel by its title bar or tab and pull it onto your document work space. This process is called undocking, and the panel becomes free-floating. When you have finished using the free-floating panel, drag it back to the edge of the screen to dock it, or click on the X button to close it.

Displaying or Docking Panels (2 of 2):

Displaying or Docking Panels (2 of 2)

Control Panel:

Control Panel The Control panel contains the most frequently used commands found in the Menu bar for text, graphics, lines, and paths and displays specific panels for each.

The Pages Panel Components (1 of 2):

The Pages Panel Components (1 of 2) The Pages panel contains two panels that help you navigate and make changes in your design project. The master page panel displays icons of the master page(s) created and named. The document panel displays page icons of all sequential document pages and their appropriate master pages. When creating booklets of adjoining pages, choose the Facing Pages option in the Pages panel.

The Pages Panel Components (2 of 2):

The Pages Panel Components (2 of 2) A document icon that displays an “A” inside and a “1” underneath indicates it is the first document page of Master Page A. The easiest way to add document pages is to select the Master Page icon and drag it down into the document page panel below the page created. This way all formatting remains the same throughout. Thumbnails display for each document for quick reference.

Pages Panel:

Pages Panel The Pages panel provides a way to create and use template guidelines with the same parameters and formatting called “master pages” through multiple documents, and provides navigation through multiple pages.

InDesign Welcome Screen with Help and Support Center (1 of 2):

InDesign Welcome Screen with Help and Support Center (1 of 2) As in all other Adobe products, the Welcome screen provides choices in document set up, links to resources and tutorials, and new feature descriptions. The InDesign Help Center provides resources to search for tutorials, information, tools, commands, functions, and techniques, including online resources. As in other applications, there is a new CS Review support center for immediate feedback between peers and clients.

InDesign Welcome Screen with Help and Support Center (2 of 2):

InDesign Welcome Screen with Help and Support Center (2 of 2)

The Coupon Advertisement (1 of 2):

The Coupon Advertisement (1 of 2) You will need to create a custom size coupon measuring in inches. You will place and accurately position a graphic for the advertisement. Coupons will be created using dashed outlines from the Stroke panel for cutting edges. You will enter text and format using the Control panel's character formatting function. The text will need to be centered and justified using the Text Frame Options function. For displaying the "cents" as smaller type in the pricing, you will create superscripts for emphasis. You will learn to add and apply new swatches using Pantone Process colors.

The Coupon Advertisement (2 of 2):

The Coupon Advertisement (2 of 2) A graphic will be placed behind the entire coupon to become the new background and add a sense of warmth. A template will be created for future editing.

Creating and Organizing Folders:

Creating and Organizing Folders When you are going to send your materials to a commercial printer or web designer, you need to keep all documents, images, and fonts in folders to be included with your InDesign document. This is crucial, otherwise images may not print at full resolution or fonts may be substituted when sent to the commercial press. It is also just as important to keep these folders with your InDesign document on your hard drive or on the same portable media, like a flash drive. Although InDesign has a utility that will perform this, it is a good habit to understand the importance of organizing and keeping files and folders in one place.

Setting Up the New Document:

Setting Up the New Document Preferences in InDesign should always be set up first before starting the document. In Windows, preferences are set in the Edit menu. In Mac OS X, the InDesign Application menu is where you would set preferences. When you create a new document (File > New > Document), you need to input information to describe the page layout. You will notice choices in the New Document window for margin and column sizes, facing pages for booklets, gutter width, and type of document orientation (portrait or landscape).

Setting Preferences:

Setting Preferences Before setting up your document, you need to set up the preferences for measurement and layout .

New Document Settings:

New Document Settings

Saving the InDesign Document:

Saving the InDesign Document When you save the InDesign document, all nonprinting guides and margins are saved as well. The extension for an InDesign project is INDD. Like all other applications, InDesign uses the Save and Save As commands, but also has a Revert to Save command to allow the designer to go back to the last “save” done on the document to get out of trouble spots while working on the project. InDesign also allows you to save the document as a template with an INDT extension, so that you can make changes to the document, save the file with a new name as desired, and the original template remains untouched. InDesign includes a Save a Copy command, which creates a duplicate of the document under a different name, leaving the original document still active.

Saving the InDesign Document (.INDD):

Saving the InDesign Document (. INDD)

Using Guides (1 of 2):

Using Guides (1 of 2) Guides are used to lay out various text and picture items with precision. Margin guides use purple lines as a default for measurements set up in creating the initial document. Layout guides are green in color and are guidelines dragged out from the top and left-side rulers. The cursor will display a double arrow to indicate a selected guideline. To remove a layout guide, click it, and when a double arrow cursor is displayed, drag it back into the ruler or select View > Hide Guides to hide all guides.

Using Guides (2 of 2):

Using Guides (2 of 2) Guides are nonprintable and can be set up in the View menu along with displaying rulers. You can also use the Control panel for exact placement by typing the location in the selected guide X or Y coordinate field. As with Photoshop and Illustrator, InDesign also has Smart Guides for precise alignment, resizing, and placement of multiple graphics and text (View > Guides and Grids > Smart Guides). With Smart guides coordinates appear dynamically you can easily snap an object's edge to other objects in your layout.

Guides:

Guides

Creating Frames (1 of 3):

Creating Frames (1 of 3) When inserting graphics, typing in, or importing text documents, you can create a frame box or container to put the contents into. With InDesign, a designer can use the various shape or the frame tools to place type or graphics, or select the type tool and drag a rectangular box to place type only. To import graphics or text, use the Place command. The Rectangle Frame tool creates frames with an “X” for placing graphics. Smart guides will display coordinates and its smart dimensions features will display arrows and center lines when the boxes are aligned.

Creating Frames (2 of 3):

Creating Frames (2 of 3) Graphics and type can also be placed without any container in InDesign. Clicking the mouse will drop the text or image on the document, with or without a box (creating frames as you place). It is generally an accepted practice in the industry that if you have created a blank box, that is where you intend to insert type. A box with an “X” in it created by one of the frame tools will usually be used for placing graphic elements You can then make adjustments to the box and format the text, or adjust the coordinates, stroke weight, and format a selected frame using the Control panel. Each graphic object placed on a document is also displayed in the Links panel, which is represented with a thumbnail that provides more detailed information when clicked, such as scale, rotation, and resolution, among other attributes. Click on the text or graphic link and find more info about that file.

Creating Frames (3 of 3):

Creating Frames (3 of 3) Setting up text and graphic boxes. Creating dashed line weight for coupons .

The Content Indicator:

The Content Indicator The Content Indicator (earlier versions used a Position tool) allows the designer to see the complete dimension of an image with a bounding box and to place the image within the frame with precision. If you use the Content Indicator (or Position tool), you will notice the area outside the graphic frame will appear faint as you move it, much like the Crop tool, so you can place the image exactly as you would like relative to the graphic frame dimensions. A bounding box appears to show outer dimensions of the graphic.

The Content Indicator and Links Panel:

The Content Indicator and Links Panel Each graphic object placed on a document is also displayed in the Links panel, which is represented with a thumbnail that provides more detailed information when clicked such as scale, rotation, and resolution, among other attributes. Click on the text or graphic link and find more info about that file .

The Position Tool and Links Panel (earlier versions):

The Position Tool and Links Panel (earlier versions)

Placing Text:

Placing Text The Type commands on the Control panel have character formatting in the “A” icon, and paragraph formatting using the paragraph icon (backward “P”).

Text Frame Options:

Text Frame Options To create space or inset within a frame, use the Text Frame Options command in the Object menu.

Formatting Type Lines:

Formatting Type Lines Formatting the type in each coupon and justifying vertical alignment.

Baselines, Superscripts, and Subscripts:

Baselines, Superscripts, and Subscripts All type sits on an invisible line called a baseline. As you look at this line of type, you are reading along the baseline that the type sits on. A designer can use certain formatting techniques, like superscript and subscript, to shrink to a percentage of the font or to change how the font is positioned in alignment with the top of the font or on the baseline. A superscript is a percentage of the original font size and will display aligned with the top of the font. Subscripts are also percentages of a font that are displayed on or below the baseline of the font.

Creating Superscripts:

Creating Superscripts Applying the superscripts option to format the cents of each price .

Swatch Color Libraries :

Swatch Color Libraries When sending a document to press, all colors need to be CMYK process colors. The swatch libraries contain libraries specific to print media like Pantone and also for web media. These colors are premixed, much as you would get at the paint store and use a numbering system to identify each specific color. You can then choose a color and save it in the Swatches panel for future use.

Choosing Pantone Colors for Swatches Panel:

Choosing Pantone Colors for Swatches Panel Choosing Pantone process colors for selected type and dashed lines in the coupons and adding those colors to the Swatches panel.

Completed Ad with Graphic Placed Behind All Objects as the Background:

Completed Ad with Graphic Placed Behind All Objects as the Background

InDesign’s New Layers Panel to Lock Graphics:

InDesign’s New Layers Panel to Lock Graphics

Saving as InDesign Template (INDT):

Saving as InDesign Template (INDT)

Advanced Users: Preflight, Packaging, and Preparing for Press:

Advanced Users: Preflight, Packaging, and Preparing for Press The Preflight utility warns of problems, such as missing files, graphics, or fonts. It also provides helpful information about your document or book, such as the inks it uses, the first page a font appears on, and print settings. You can perform preflight during various stages of your project.

Checking for Errors (1 of 2):

Checking for Errors (1 of 2) Preparing your project for publishing involves the task of examining all elements and items of the project for spelling, layout, and updating of any graphics or text files to catch the common errors that lead to most delays and additional expense. Problems encountered during production can disrupt a whole schedule.

Checking for Errors (2 of 2):

Checking for Errors (2 of 2) This is why it is important to prepare files correctly by examining all components and submitting all necessary documentation to the service provider before production to avoid additional costs set by disrupted production, scheduling, and time wasted tracking down missing files and fonts. InDesign comes with an array of utilities to check for errors and prepare files, reports, and documents to the service provider.

Check Spelling Utility:

Check Spelling Utility InDesign has a spelling checking feature in the Edit menu that not only allows you to check for spelling errors, but also to autocorrect and add special words in the dictionary .

Links Panel:

Links Panel Before sending any file or completed document, always check to see if your links are up to date. By double-clicking the file you are checking on the Links panel, you will find plenty of information, including file size and color mode, so you can make your edits accordingly. Each object in the Links panel is represented with a thumbnail that provides more detailed additional information when clicked, such as scale, rotation, and resolution, among other attributes. You can use the Links panel to find, sort, and manage all of your placed objects.

Links Panel to Check File Link Information:

Links Panel to Check File Link Information You can use the Links panel to find, sort, and manage all of your placed objects. You can select the Relink icon to find where you put the file that is linked in the document. The Go To Link icon shows you the actual graphic’s location in your document. The Update Link icon lets you update the link location .

InDesign Preflight Utilities:

InDesign Preflight Utilities Before you send any work to a client or the service provider, which can be your commercial printer, web developer, or other professional who will provide a service for setting up your document for whatever output media you intend to use, you need to go through a process called preflight to check for any errors. The default preflight settings are to "Enable Preflight for All Documents" and "Preflight Document," which are located at the bottom of the window display, which is used for checking graphics and text behind the scenes while you work. InDesign also has a live Preflight panel to work along with the Links panel in identifying and correcting errors on the fly. With this new feature, a designer does not have to wait until the document is near completion before finding errors. InDesign’s Preflight utility (File > Preflight) warns of problems, such as missing files, graphics, or fonts.

Live Preflighting to Check Files, Fonts, and Images :

Live Preflighting to Check Files, Fonts, and Images

Preparing for Press (1 of 2):

Preparing for Press (1 of 2) With the work completed, it is time to create a proof that can be used as a communication tool between you, your client, and the service provider with which you are working. Usually a proof contains the printer settings or printer’s marks for you to communicate the layout of the document, color accuracy, registration marks, and trim marks. Before final packaging, you need a final soft proof to be approved by designer, client, and service provider.

Preparing for Press (2 of 2):

Preparing for Press (2 of 2) Printer’s marks include registration marks that provide a place for pin registration of plates for the press (they look like bull’s eyes) and color bars to balance and check the color. Crop marks indicate where the cutting of the paper will be. If you are setting crop marks and want the artwork to contain a bleed or slug area, make sure that you extend the artwork past the crop marks to accommodate the bleed or slug. The bleed area is the part of text or objects that extend beyond the page boundaries after trimming. The slug area is an area outside the page and bleed that contains printer instructions or job sign-off information.

Creating a Proof With Printer’s Marks:

Creating a Proof With Printer’s Marks

Packaging:

Packaging InDesign has a handy utility called Packaging that will complete final packaging for you. When you package a file, you create a folder that contains the InDesign document, any necessary fonts, linked graphics, text files, and a customized report. This report, which is saved as a text file, includes the information in the Printing Instructions dialog box (from the Preflight dialog box); a list of all used fonts, links, and inks required to print the document; and print settings.

Packaging Utility:

Packaging Utility

Creating PDFs for All to Read:

Creating PDFs for All to Read If a client does not have the current version of InDesign installed, a universal proof is needed that embeds all fonts and graphics to provide to a printer. A designer can use the Export command (File > Export) in InDesign to create a PDF document. This can be read by the free Acrobat Reader available on the Adobe site and other graphic applications as well. InDesign also allows you to select the quality of the PDF file you wish to create. Press Quality is always the best for distributing to a commercial press, but if you want to send a document through e-mail for a preliminary proofing, you may want to choose Smallest File Size under the Adobe PDF Preset pull down menu.

Setting Up PDF Press Quality:

Setting Up PDF Press Quality

What the Service Provider Needs: Summary:

What the Service Provider Needs: Summary Updated electronic files in organized folders. All items should be set in CMYK color mode for press inks. Native PSD and AI documents can also be used. Photographs, painted images, and detailed drawings can be saved as TIFF images, while illustrations and images with text can be saved as EPS files. High-resolution PDF files are also acceptable and keep formatting consistent. The most up-to-date laser proof needs to be included, labeled with name and date to provide hard copy confirmation of how the final layout should appear (before using the InDesign’s Package utility). It should also include trim and registration marks for the pressman to follow. Folder and files, the document, and a report file that can be generated by InDesign’s Package utility to provide all files, fonts, and basic job information needed and print specifications.

Creating a 4-Page Newsletter:

Creating a 4-Page Newsletter

Measuring With Inches and Points:

Measuring With Inches and Points Although most designers lay out text and graphic items using fractions and inches as standards of measurement, font sizes and spacing are measured in points. Desktop publishing and word processing programs use points universally as a default measurement for sizing type fonts and spacing between characters and lines of type. Where 72 points is the equivalent of one inch and 36 points equals one-half inch, you can see why using points is a more precise method of measuring for those smaller measurements. One inch is the equivalent of 72 points; whereas 12 points equals one pica. Six picas are equal to an inch.

Converting Measurements:

Converting Measurements In the printing industry when measuring with picas and points, the designation “3” indicates three picas in measurement, whereas “9” after the letter "p" indicates 9 points. The measurement “3p9,” for instance, indicates 3 picas and 9 points, or the equivalent to 5/8 of an inch .

Master Pages:

Master Pages Every new document created has a document page and a master page that is displayed in the Pages panel. Master pages are document templates that a designer can modify to provide a consistency in placed items, page formats, formatting, and guidelines for multiple documents. To edit a master page, double-click on the thumbnail in the Pages panel, and then make your changes. You can also create a variety of master pages and change documents to meet your needs. For example, for a book, you might create master pages for the table of contents, body of a chapter, glossary, and index .

Master Pages and Documents:

Master Pages and Documents Pages panel contains master pages and documents, individually and as spreads .

Organizing Workflow:

Organizing Workflow Organizing folders and setting up the document for the newsletter with facing pages option and pica measurement.

CMYK Process and Spot Colors (1 of 2):

CMYK Process and Spot Colors (1 of 2) Every color in the InDesign Color panel is defined as either a process color or a spot color. Commercial printers use inks comprising percentages of the colors cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (CMYK), determined by a subtractive process. The color black (K) is added last as a fourth color for purity in shadows and improved contrast and tones. These four colors are used in four separate plates during the printing process, hence the term “CMYK process colors.”

CMYK Process and Spot Colors (2 of 2):

CMYK Process and Spot Colors (2 of 2) Documents can also be created with a two-color process usually having black as one of the colors and a second color as a spot color. This can still create attention-getting graphics, while saving the client the cost of a four-color process. Spot colors are special color libraries of premixed inks that will produce a certain color with one ink layer. Spot colors usually are designated by a title description and a number and are printed as a single-ink plate rather than a combination of CMYK inks.

Pantone Colors From Color Library:

Pantone Colors From Color Library

Using Continuing Banners:

Using Continuing Banners The continuing banner continues the style, color, and theme of a multipage document though the pages. You can continue the formatted name of the newsletter and page numbers to help the reader identify what they are reading. You can also create an auto-page marker number that inserts a master page character (A) and automatically updates changes in organization of pages. In CS5, the Control panel provides easy access to a pop up Swatches panel.

Creating Rules and Color Bars for a Continuing Banner:

Creating Rules and Color Bars for a Continuing Banner

Creating Continuing Banner:

Creating Continuing Banner

Editing Master Page Items:

Editing Master Page Items You can override components of a master page you want to replace on a certain page, instead of removing the master template.

Components of a Front Page (1 of 2):

Components of a Front Page (1 of 2) The first page of a newsletter is the initial eye catcher that entices the reader to take a look at various articles. A newsletter has a nameplate that identifies the newsletter and what the reader may expect. It may also include relevant information like the author or editor, issue number, and additional information the reader might need. It usually contains a graphic or logo with a formatted title to make it stand out. The nameplate is also called the masthead sometimes, although technically the masthead is on one of the other pages that list the publisher, subscription rates, and so on.

Components of a Front Page (2 of 2):

Components of a Front Page (2 of 2) A small index box may be included to help the reader navigate through various articles. A drop cap is a larger letter or group of letters that extend over lines of text to start off an article. This technique is used frequently in the front page's first article.

InDesign’s New Layers Panel:

InDesign’s New Layers Panel In CS5, there is a Layers panel that works much like the one in Illustrator. You can create individual layers of your document to match your pages and lock the graphics or text frames so they cannot be adjusted by mistake. You can also right click on the layer item to select it on the document, which helps when you have lots of items on a page. Each layer here will represent one page. For that layer to be active and to observe its contents, you will need to select the page in the Pages panel first. To keep track of your graphic links you use the Links panel.

Creating Guides to Align Text and Graphics:

Creating Guides to Align Text and Graphics Layout of guides using the Rectangle Frame tool to create graphic frames for placement of graphics in pages. Using the Layers panel to keep track of frames in each page.

Guides to Align Graphics for Page 3:

Guides to Align Graphics for Page 3

Smart Guides and Smart Spacing:

Smart Guides and Smart Spacing With Smart Guides turned on, you can not only have “X” and “Y” coordinates appear dynamically, you can easily find the central points of multiple objects or shapes by aligning their center lines. To align items to match, Smart Spacing and Smart Dimensions (which are features turned on when you select Smart Guides) arrow indicators appear as you move your selection. Smart spacing evenly spaces multiple items by snapping objects into position. When the arrows display and center lines appear, you have perfect alignment with other objects. When you stop, the guides disappear, so your layout remains uncluttered. If you need to move your objects in relation to the others you want to match, Smart Dimensions will highlight when the dimensions match the others. With these new tools, you get immediate feedback with precise positioning. You can also use the new Gap tool.

Using Smart Guides for Graphic Placement with Layers and Links Panels :

Using Smart Guides for Graphic Placement with Layers and Links Panels

Threading Text Into Columns:

Threading Text Into Columns Connecting text among selected frames is called threading text. You can thread text to flow in selected text frames manually or automatically. To import text to multiple columns manually, you do not need to create text frames. Sometimes a red plus sign displays; this is called the overset symbol, which indicates that there is more text that needs to be displayed. You can create a text frame before placing text, or you can manually flow text between columns using the Selection tool.

Importing Text Into Selected Frame:

Importing Text Into Selected Frame

The Overset Symbol:

The Overset Symbol Sometimes when you place type into a frame container, there is no type that appears, only a red plus sign. This is called an overset symbol. It is a text "overflow" symbol indicating too much text is in the frame container.

Threading Text Using Semi-Auto Flow:

Threading Text Using Semi-Auto Flow The Semi- autoflow method provides control and allows you as the designer to select nonadjacent frames, different pages, or columns next to one another to thread the text. What works nicely with this technique is that the cursor is automatically loaded each time a frame is covered with text until all text is flowed into the project. The loaded text cursor here looks like a sideways "S" curve half solid and half dotted. With the Selection tool still active, hold down the Option (Mac) or Alt (PC) key to set up for semi- autoflow .

Threading Text Between Pages:

Threading Text Between Pages

Using Text Wrap Options:

Using Text Wrap Options Setting text wrap options allows the designer to create space between graphics and text .

Creating Jump Lines (1 of 2):

Creating Jump Lines (1 of 2) You can let readers know where to locate the rest of the article. To do this, you create a jump line that continues to other pages, such as a line that says “Continued on page 4.” Use a jump-line page number to automatically update the number of the page containing a story’s next or previous threaded text frame when you move or reflow the story’s text frames. Always the jump-line page number should be in a separate text frame from the story it tracks. That way, the jump-line page number remains in position even if the story’s text reflows, and the page number automatically updates to reflect the current page location.

Creating Jump Lines (2 of 2):

Creating Jump Lines (2 of 2)

Using Pull Quotes:

Using Pull Quotes Pull quotes are used in long articles to “pull” a line or comment out of an article that helps to identify that article to the reader. Pull quotes are inserted in between two paragraphs with enough offset spacing to make them stand out. The Paragraph panel provides most of the formatting essentials to type lines, including paragraph rules you will need and is selected in the Type menu (Type > Paragraph).

Creating Pull Quotes:

Creating Pull Quotes

Adding Drop Caps:

Adding Drop Caps Drop caps are used to grab the reader’s attention in starting a story in an article, or on the front page of a newsletter.

Applying Rules:

Applying Rules Rules can be used in continuing banner components, in separating articles, and for pull quotes.

Using Tabs:

Using Tabs Tabs are important in creating accurate columns of data. When you are planning to tab data, do the typing first, making sure you press the Tab key once between columns of data. It may not look correct, but that will be adjusted afterward when you set what are called tab stops. In the Tabs panel, you will notice various methods of setting tabs using the tab arrows to align flush left, right, centered, or on special characters, such as decimal points, or the "=" sign of an equation, and so on. For multiple lines of tabbing and to help keep the data focused, you can create leading characters such as periods in the Leader box that leads the viewer to the tabbed information.

Creating Alignment with Tabs for Index:

Creating Alignment with Tabs for Index

Creating Alignment for Terms and Definitions:

Creating Alignment for Terms and Definitions

Final Formatting:

Final Formatting Applying formatting headings and sub headings. Reflowing text to remove widows.

Advanced Users: Baseline Alignment, Automation with Styles, and Object Libraries:

Advanced Users: Baseline Alignment, Automation with Styles, and Object Libraries Using a baseline grid ensures consistency in the location of text elements on a page when you want the baselines of text in multiple columns or adjacent text frames to align. A character style is a collection of character formatting attributes that can be applied to text in a single step. A paragraph style includes both character and paragraph formatting attributes and can be applied to a selected paragraph or range of paragraphs. When you change the formatting of a style, all text to which the style has been applied will be updated with the new format. Paragraph style can also include rules, tabs, and spacing.

Using Baseline Grids:

Using Baseline Grids

Character and Paragraph Styles:

Character and Paragraph Styles

Object Libraries:

Object Libraries Object libraries help you organize the graphics, text, and pages you use most often. You can also add ruler guides, grids, drawn shapes, and grouped images to a library. If an object library includes text files, make sure that the file’s fonts are available and active on all systems that will access the library. When you add a page element, such as a graphic, to an object library, InDesign preserves all attributes that were imported or applied. For example, if you add a graphic from an InDesign document to a library, the library copy will duplicate the original, including the original’s link information, so that you can update the graphic in the file on disk changes .

Creating an Object Library:

Creating an Object Library

Summary:

Summary This presentation has covered a lot of material regarding InDesign. By the end of the semester, all of the concepts and skills covered should be understood. If there was something in this presentation that was new to you, or not completely clear, please refer to your book or the InDesign Help menu for more information.