W. B. Yeats

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

A presentation on the Irish poet and Nobel prize W. B. Yeats

Comments

By: puppy1228 (62 month(s) ago)

a good PPT about Yeats

Presentation Transcript

WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS : 

WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

THE EARLY PERIOD : 

THE EARLY PERIOD Was born in 1865 in Dublin; Studied poetry and was fascinated by Irish legends, mystical doctrines, magic and theosophy; He become a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood; In 1890 he composed “THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE”, included in the collection The Rose(1893).

THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE : 

THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE Published in 1893.Published in the collection "The rose".Composed by three short quatrains.

I will arise and go now,and go to Innisfree,and a small cabin build there,of clay and wattles made:nine bean-rows will I have there,a hive for the honey-bee,and live alone in the bee-loud glade. : 

I will arise and go now,and go to Innisfree,and a small cabin build there,of clay and wattles made:nine bean-rows will I have there,a hive for the honey-bee,and live alone in the bee-loud glade. In the first line Yeats establishes the opening tone as well as the refrain of the poem.In the line 2-4 the speaker describes Innisfree as a simple,natural environment where we will build a cabin and live alone.

And I shall have some peace there,for peace comes dropping slow,dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket signs;there midnight's all a GLIMMER and noon a PURPLE glow,and evening full of the linnet's wings. : 

And I shall have some peace there,for peace comes dropping slow,dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket signs;there midnight's all a GLIMMER and noon a PURPLE glow,and evening full of the linnet's wings. -In this stanza Yeats images finding harmony on the island.-The animals and the plants of the first stanza give way to animals associated with colours in this one.-NATURE provides an inherently restorative place to which human beings can go to escape the chaos and corrupting influences of civilization.

I will arise and go now,for always night and dayI hear lake water lapping with low SOUNDS by the shore;While I stand on the roadway,or on the pavements grey,I HEAR IT IN THE DEEP HEART'S CORE. : 

I will arise and go now,for always night and dayI hear lake water lapping with low SOUNDS by the shore;While I stand on the roadway,or on the pavements grey,I HEAR IT IN THE DEEP HEART'S CORE. -The sound of tides is all the speaker hears in the heart of heart:his world,where life is artificial is still connected in some way to the other realm of imagination.-The final line is a crucial statement for Yeats,not only in his poem,but also in his career as a whole.

Sound effects: : 

Sound effects: -ALLITTERATION:"I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore".-ASSONANCE:“I hear it in the deep heart's core".-RHYMING SCHEME:abab-INTERNAL RHYME:“dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket signs".SYNAESTHESIA:"And I shall have some peace there,for peace comes dropping slow".

-The instructor of english literature SEMANSKY in his essay consideres the relationship between self-image and daydreaming in "The lake isle of Innisfree". : 

-The instructor of english literature SEMANSKY in his essay consideres the relationship between self-image and daydreaming in "The lake isle of Innisfree". "Although not everyone necessarily desires to live in a small cabin,the wish to live close to nature and away from the distractions of modern life is common,as is it the wish to see one's own self in the best possible light". -In another essay,HUNTER examines what Innisfree simbolises to Yeats as a poet.

THE MIDDLE PERIOD : 

THE MIDDLE PERIOD He founded the IRISH THEATRICAL SOCIETY, which was to become the “Abbey Theatre”; This hope in a Irish cultural renaissance found expression in a series of essays called “The Celtic Twilight”(1893); Under the influence of Ezra Pound, Yeats’s style became more modern, characterized by symbol; The Easter Rebellion in 1916 brought about a change in his political attitude; Composed “EASTER” (1916), then included in the collection of Michael Robartes and The Dancer (1921).

EASTER,1916 : 

EASTER,1916 THE POEM WAS WRITTEN AFTER THE EASTER RISING IN DUBLIN ON 24° APRIL 1916. IT’S COMPOSED BY SIX STANZAS.

I have met them at close of dayComing with vivid facesFrom counter or desk among greyEighteenth-century houses.I have passed with a nod of the headOr polite meaningless words,Or have lingered awhile and saidPolite meaningless words,And thought before I had doneOf a mocking take or a gibe          10To please a companionAround the fire at the clubBeing certain that they and IBut lived where motley is worn:All changed, changed utterly:A terrible beauty is born. : 

I have met them at close of dayComing with vivid facesFrom counter or desk among greyEighteenth-century houses.I have passed with a nod of the headOr polite meaningless words,Or have lingered awhile and saidPolite meaningless words,And thought before I had doneOf a mocking take or a gibe          10To please a companionAround the fire at the clubBeing certain that they and IBut lived where motley is worn:All changed, changed utterly:A terrible beauty is born. First stanza:“a terrible beauty is born”:the people are finally uniting in this fight ,but the conceguences will be tragic .

Second and third stanza : 

Second and third stanza That woman’s days were spent in ignorant good-will, her nights in argument until her voice grew shrill. What voice more sweet than hers when,young and beautiful, she rode to harriers? This man had kept a school and rode our winged this other his helper and friend was coming into his force; he might have won fame in the end, so sensitive his nature seemed, so daring and sweet his thought. This other man I had dreamed A drunken,vainglorious lout. Ha had done most bitter wrong Yet I know him in the song; He, too,has been changed in his turn, trasformed utterly: A terrible beauty is born. Yeats suggets the humanity of Ireland’s heroes and says that common citizens are the heroes.

fourth stanza : 

fourth stanza Hearts with one purpose alone Through summer and winter seem Enchanted to a stone To trouble the living stream. The horse that comes from the road, The rider,the birds that range From cloud to tumbling cloud, Minute by minute they change, A shadow of cloud on the stream Changes minute by minute, a horse-hoof slides on the brim, And a horse plashes within it; The long-legged moor-hans dive, And hens to moor-cocks call, Minute by minute they live; the stone’s in the midst of all. The “stone”:the symbol of consistency, it’s something of inanimated. The motif of nature(stream and clouds). The Boyne River

fifth stanza : 

fifth stanza Too long a sacrifice Can make a stone of the heart O when may it suffice? That is Heaven’s part,our part To murmur name upon name, As a mother names her child When sleep at last has come On limbs that had run wild. What is it but nightfall? No,no,not night but death; Was it needless death after all? the heart in trasformation. The metaphor of sleep.

sixth stanza : 

sixth stanza For england may keep faith For all that is done and said. We know their dream;enough To know they dreamed and are dead; And what if excess of love Bewildered them till they died? I write it out in a verse MacDonagh and MacBride And Connolly and Pearse. Now and in time to be, Wherever green is worn, Are changed,changed Utterly: A terrible beauty is born. “excess of love” for their cause,country,and dream. The colour “green”.

Sound effects : 

Sound effects Repetition Allitteration Assonance Metaphor

LATER PERIOD : 

LATER PERIOD In 1922 he became a senator in the upper house of the Dail; In December of 1923, Yeats was awarded the NOBEL PRIZE for literature; He composed “BYZANTIUM”; After the marriage of Georgie Hyde-Less in 1917, Yeats worked up supernatural communications into the elaborate pseudo- philosophical system set out in “ A Vision”(1925); He died in France in January 1939.

“SAILING TO BYZANTIUM” : 

“SAILING TO BYZANTIUM” “Sailing to Byzantium” is a poem first published in the 1928 collection “the Tower”. It comprises four stanzas in ottava rima, each made up of eight ten-syllable lines. It depicts a portion of an old man’s journey to Constantinople. Through this journey, Yeats explores his thoughts and musings on how immortality, art, and the human spirit may converge. Through the use of various poetic techniques, Yeats' "Sailing to Byzantium" describes the metaphorical journey of a man pursuing his own vision of eternal life.

That is no country for old men. The young In one another's arms, birds in the trees - Those dying generations - at their song, The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long Whatever is begotten, born, and dies. Caught in that sensual music all neglect Monuments of unageing intellect. : 

That is no country for old men. The young In one another's arms, birds in the trees - Those dying generations - at their song, The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long Whatever is begotten, born, and dies. Caught in that sensual music all neglect Monuments of unageing intellect. The first stanza consists of the speaker describing his former country, a place that is not oriented toward the aged. The nature could represent Yeats Ireland. The world is nothing but “sensual music”. Use of symbolisms

An aged man is but a paltry thing, A tattered coat upon a stick, unless Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing For every tatter in its mortal dress, Nor is there singing school but studying Monuments of its own magnificence; And therefore I have sailed the seas and come To the holy city of Byzantium. : 

An aged man is but a paltry thing, A tattered coat upon a stick, unless Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing For every tatter in its mortal dress, Nor is there singing school but studying Monuments of its own magnificence; And therefore I have sailed the seas and come To the holy city of Byzantium. The second stanza describes elderly humans as thin and frail. This undesirable state can only be eliminated through the efforts of the soul. Elaborating on the "old men", Yeats’ use the phrase "tattered coat upon a stick", which alludes to the image of a scarecrow. This image provides a link to the first stanza. The song could be learnt by the monument of the first stanza; Previously attributed to “unageing intellect” and to “its own magnificence” Yeats considers the relics of the intellect – the arts – magnificent and beyond time. The speaker, identifying himself as the aged man, comes to Byzantium to learn how to sing and separate his soul from his scarecrow of a body.

O sages standing in God's holy fireAs in the gold mosaic of a wall,Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,And be the singing-masters of my soul.Consume my heart away; sick with desireAnd fastened to a dying animalIt knows not what it is; and gather meInto the artifice of eternity. : 

O sages standing in God's holy fireAs in the gold mosaic of a wall,Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,And be the singing-masters of my soul.Consume my heart away; sick with desireAnd fastened to a dying animalIt knows not what it is; and gather meInto the artifice of eternity. Having arrived at Byzantium, the speaker begins a prayer to the sages within the city, to be cleverly assimilated by the continuum of eternity. Use of symbolisms from mythology and religion.

Once out of nature I shall never takeMy bodily form from any natural thing,But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths makeOf hammered gold and gold enamellingTo keep a drowsy Emperor awake;Or set upon a golden bough to singTo lords and ladies of ByzantiumOf what is past, or passing, or to come. : 

Once out of nature I shall never takeMy bodily form from any natural thing,But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths makeOf hammered gold and gold enamellingTo keep a drowsy Emperor awake;Or set upon a golden bough to singTo lords and ladies of ByzantiumOf what is past, or passing, or to come. Stanza four continues the speaker’s prayer. Once transformed by the gyre of fate, the speaker vows to never return to not only his body but “any natural thing” as well. “the form as Grecian goldsmiths make” (IV.27) is bird imagery, alluding to the Byzantine Emperor Theophilos who had made for himself mechanical golden birds that sang upon the branches of a golden tree. The speaker’s desired form may be interpreted as a balanced synthesis of the natural world and the eternal world, the speaker could sing his soul without the constraints of time, singing of past, present, and future. The synthetic quality of his form may also represent the works of art left for future humanity.

STYLISTIC DEVICES : 

STYLISTIC DEVICES Inversions Consonances Metaphors Repetitions

Yeats and Modernism : 

Yeats and Modernism Eliot spoke of Yeats as a belated Modernist—‘a late developer’—and the general idea is that Pound in 1913 wrestles Yeats from Celtic Twilight into Modernism – wrong: Yeats’ transformation predates Pound’s arrival: crisis of nationality and Modernity in Ireland. Yeats, the Romantic Irish nationalism is disillusioned by his rejection by the political mainstream in Ireland at the time: becomes increasingly isolated and authoritarian: this political change helps divest him of his early Romanticism.

THE USE OF SYMBOLS : 

THE USE OF SYMBOLS Yeats frequently alludes to events and characters in myth and history or in the world around him. The ideas of symbols and images are central to understand Yeats’s poetry. They are themes in which truths are embodied since they have the power to “evoke indefinable and yet precise emotions”.

YEATS’S CONCEPT OF HISTORY : 

YEATS’S CONCEPT OF HISTORY History mirrors the life of man. Influenced by neoplatonic doctrines Yeats sees history as formed by a series of opposite cycles (something like Vico’s repetition of historical phenomena or corsi e ricorsi). He conceived history as composed of two cones, rotating in opposite directions, the gyre. The gyre combines a rotating movement with a forward one. These movements represent the flow of a life cycle towards its end and the beginning of a new cycle. The gyre thus symbolizes the course of both mankind and history

MAIN THEMES : 

MAIN THEMES Bitter vision of man’s destiny. Pessimistic view of the empty modern world. Belief in the eternity and beauty of art.

STYLE AND LANGUAGE : 

STYLE AND LANGUAGE Use of many stylistic devices. Many poetic forms, such as the ballad, the sonnet, the dramatic monologue and meditative or reflective poems. Irony and use of rhetorical questions. Many words of sensual and sensory experience, with a physical, tactile quality, but also referred to the mind and the soul. His early poetic diction, written in over-refined language, lacked vitality, while his later poetry recovered the idioms of everyday speech.