NACE MR0175 CRA Exam- Reading 2c Q&A

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

My NACE MR0175 Study Notes

Comments

Presentation Transcript

slide 1:

NACE MR0175- CRA NACE MR0175- CRA Written Exam Written Exam My Reading 2c QA 102162 2017 Dec 2 nd AEON Indahpura p Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

slide 2:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

slide 3:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

slide 4:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

slide 5:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

slide 6:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

slide 7:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

slide 8:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

slide 9:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭 门 练 功

slide 10:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭 门 练 功

slide 11:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭 门 练 功

slide 12:

NACE MR0175 Written Exam Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

slide 13:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

slide 14:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 101. In NACE MR0175 is nitro-carburizing allowed Question: Will "Nitro-Carburizing" be allowed surface treatment with the same status of "Nitriding" If it is allowed would the NACE requirement be the same as Nitriding or it would be different Answer: As ISO 15156 is written today the acceptable surface treatment has been defined solely as nitriding below the lower critical temperature. Additional response to query submitter: We believe that you have identified an area where our standard ISO 15156 does not accurately define what has been accepted practice in the Oil Gas Industry. It has been common practice to use salt bath liquid or ion nitriding including nitrocarburizing and carbonitriding for a wide variety of applications. The two key elements that have been constant through the years are that the maximum case depth has been defined as 0.15 mm 0.006” and the process temperature is below the temperature where any new transformation products are formed this is the lower critical temperature for the alloy being processed. The only application problems that we are aware of are when the nitriding and related processes are applied to areas where the local yield strength is exceeded in these areas the plastic deformation has resulted in local breaks or cracks through the hardened surface due to the reduced ductility that is associated with the higher hardness. The MP will propose a ballot to clarify the description of acceptable processes. Note that this ballot will need to be successful before this is an approved process listed in ISO 15156. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.1.5.1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 15:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 102. 22HRC for NACE MR0175 is it before or after shaping forming cold reducing expansion Question: As per Technical Circular 3 of ISO 15156 Part 3 Table A.2 parent material selected for our site condition complies with note a of table A.2. This parent material will comply with requirement of maximum 22HRC. It is not mentioned in note a if this maximum hardness requirement should be verified before or after shaping forming cold reducing tension expansion etc… Could you please clarify Answer: Hardness requirement of maximum 22 HRC shall be verified after cold working. Note that cold working intended to enhance the mechanical properties is prohibited. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-11 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 16:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 103. Refinery sour gas treatment units what are the NACE MR0175 limits Question: We are now in the detailed engineering design phase of a sour gas refinery and we have implemented NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 for design purposes. NaCl sodium chloride will come to the refinery through three-phase flow pipeline from offshore after liquid separation in slug catcher then the sour gas will go to gas treatment units for further processing. Table A.2 refers to chloride content in aqueous solution as mg/L my question is in sour gas treatment units in which we use austenitic stainless steel what are the criteria for the limitation of application of austenitic stainless steel My idea is we have to comply with the first row of Table A.2. There is no means to identify the chloride content in the gas stream. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 17:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: It is assumed in Table A.2 that this is a mixed-phase environment with both a gas phase and a liquid phase. This is always true throughout the document. The operator is responsible for determining the service conditions including chloride content see ISO 15156-1 6.1 and the ISO Maintenance Panel cannot provide advice. As mentioned in ISO 15156-3 A.1.3 Paragraph 2: “The tables show the application limits with respect to temperature pH2S Cl pH S. These limits apply collectively.” However if as an equipment user you feel that ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 does not address your expected field conditions you have the freedom to test materials under alternative environmental limits and to use the outcome of successful tests to justify the use of a material outside the limits set in the standard. See ISO 15156-3 6.1 Para. 5. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-21 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 18:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 104. SS316L in thermowell applications and NACE MR0175 Question: I have a technical query related MR0175/ISO 15156 and the use of 316 stainless steel for sour service application. This standard imposes restrictions on the use of 316 SS in environments operating above 60°C. My question is can 316 SS be used above 60°C for non-stressed vessel internals or for items such as thermowells located into sour lines or vessels I ask this because I note that the standard need not be applied to parts loaded in compression Table 1. The implication may be that parts have to be stressed for SCC to be an issue. As a similar situation to vessel internals and thermowells please could you advise on the use of 316 stainless steel for valve internals in a sour application operating above 60°C. Of particular interest is the use of solid 316 SS balls for ball valves. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 19:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: 1.0 The scope of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 3 Paragraph 1 Sentence 1 defines the applicability of the standard. The standard need not be applied for equipment not covered by this sentence. In addition in Table 1 parts loaded in compression are included among those considered to be "permitted exclusions." SCC requires a tensile stress applied and/or residual to occur. There is no provision for any of the alloys in the standard for a threshold tensile stress below which failure cannot occur. 2.0 The Maintenance Panel cannot analyze the design of equipment. It is up to the manufacturer and equipment user to agree whether or not the scope or any of the listed exclusions in Table 1 apply for a given design. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 20:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 105. What is the NACE MR0175 test location for round bar stock 304/316 SS Question: For round bar stock 304/316 SS material does the NACE MR0175 Rockwell C 22 max hardness requirement refer to the hardness anywhere on the raw material or does it refer to the hardness measured at mid-radius which is the location where ASTM standards require the hardness measurement to be made For 304/316 austenitic stainless steel MR0175 indicates that the hardness must be Rockwell C 22 max as long as the material was not hardened to enhance mechanical properties. The hardness on 304/316 SS round bar typically varies with radial position. The material typically has the highest hardness readings at the outer surface and lowest in the center. ASTM standards define hardness measurements for bar stock to be taken at mid-radius. In purchasing raw material the hardness readings reported are at mid-radius. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 21:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer The Maintenance Panel cannot comment on the hardness test locations specified in ASTM standards. These materials when used for sour service must comply with all the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2. The definition of the hardness testing location is outside the scope of the standard but hardness requirements must be met regardless of the chosen test location. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-05 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 22:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 106. NACE MR0175 allow the use of Alloys S20100 S20200 and S20500 Question: Clause A.2.1 lists the required elements and ranges for austenitic stainless steels. Alloys S20100 S20200 and S20500 listed in table D1 do not meet the specified limits nor are they covered by individual approval. Is there any reason for these materials being listed in the aforementioned table Answer: These alloys do not meet the requirements of A.2 so they are not covered by the ISO 15156-3 austenitic stainless steel limit tables. Annex D as stated in the standard is for information only. It is not a list of approved materials. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-19 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 23:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table D.1 — Chemical compositions of some austenitic stainless steels see A.2 and D.3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Stainless Steel 201 – UNS S20100 Lower nickel alloy with similar properties to 301 Slightly magnetic when work hardened Retains ductility when cold worked yet develops higher yield strength than 301 Used in food service clamps automotive trim and architectural applications

slide 24:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2 Austenitic stainless steels identified as material type and as individual alloys A.2.1 Materials analyses Austenitic stainless steels of this material type shall contain the following elements in the following proportions expressed as mass fractions:  C 008 max  Cr 16 min  Ni 8 min  P 0045 max  S 004 max  Mn 20 max and  Si 20 max. Other alloying elements are permitted. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 25:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 107. SS 304L for compressor pipeline and NACE MR0175 Question: I have an application where I am supplying a pipeline from a gas compressor to a turbine generator. The pipe is 10 in. in diameter and contains natural gas with H2S. The H2S concentration is 250 ppm by volume. The gas is pressurized to 475 psi 152°F. I would like to know what table from Annex A this pipe would fall under. The material I would like to use is 304L SS which satisfies the requirements in A.2. I would appreciate any guidance you can provide with this subject. Parameters: Material 304L SS H2S concentration is 250 ppm 250mg/l Pressurized 475 psi Temperature 152°F https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ To convert parts per million to milligrams per liter use the conversion factor of 1 ppm 1 mg/L. This means that 1 part per million is equal to 1 milligram per liter. https://www.reference.com/science/convert-ppm-mg-l- c72b6a5cdb763e85 Full Answer Milligrams per liter is an important unit of measure that illustrates the concentration of dissolved substances. This unit of measure is a ratio of mass or weight per volume. This differs from parts per million which instead is a measure of weight per weight or mass per mass. The unit parts per million is used when there is a very low concentration of a solution. One gram of a solution in 1000 milliliters equals 1000 parts per million. When the mass of the solution is reduced to 1/1000 of a gram in 1000 milliliters this equals 1 part per million. Because 1000 milliliters equals one liter 1 part per million is 1 milligram per liter. One part per million only equals 1 milligram per liter in the event that the solvent is water. This is a direct result of waters gravity which is very close to one. When the solute or the substance dissolved in the solution is less than 1 percent it can be assumed that the liter of water weighs 1000 grams which is equal to 1 million milligrams.

slide 26:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Scenario: • Material 304L SS • H 2 S concentration is 250 ppm • Pressurized 475 psi • Temperature 152°F https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Gas Compressor Turbine Generator Pipeline Use Table A.2 Could be 100KM away

slide 27:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.1 — Guidance on the use of the materials selection tables of Annex A based on equipment or component type https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 28:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.6 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used in compressors and instrumentation and control devices https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Compressor means compressor component

slide 29:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang For these applications these materials shall also  be in the solution-annealed and quenched or annealed and stabilized heat-treatment condition  be free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties and  have a maximum hardness of 22 HRC. A limit on the martensite content of these austenitic stainless steels should be considered. a No data submitted to ascertain whether these materials are acceptable for service in the presence of elemental sulfur in the environment. b Instrumentation and control devices include but are not limited to diaphragms pressure measuring devices and pressure seals. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 30:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-3:2015E A.2 Austenitic stainless steels identified as material type and as individual alloys A.2.1 Materials analyses Austenitic stainless steels of this material type shall contain the following elements in the following proportions expressed as mass fractions:  C 008 max  Cr 16 min  Ni 8 min  P 0045 max  S 004 max  Mn 20 max and  Si 20 max. Other alloying elements are permitted. Higher carbon contents for UNS S30900 and S31000 are acceptable up to the limits of their respective specifications. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 31:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.2 Environmental and materials limits for the uses of austenitic stainless steels Table A.2 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 32:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Table A.2 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components

slide 33:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: 1 a NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.6 provides environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used in compressors. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 applies to austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components. b The limits on austenitic stainless steels in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.6 when compared to those of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 are based upon industry experience with these alloys in compressors. c The latest editions of API Standard 618 for Reciprocating compressors and API Standard 617 for Axial and Centrifugal compressors define the scope of equipment associated with the compressor environment including accessories instrumentation and piping systems. d It is the user’s responsibility to determine if the pipe mentioned in your inquiry is directly associated with the compressor and experiences the same service environment as inferred for compressors in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3Table A.6. e The Maintenance Panel cannot review individually designed equipment and pressure stations to make this interpretation. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 34:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: 2 a The manufacturer and user may consider documenting previous experience with pipelines in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156- 1 Paragraphs 8.2 and 9.0. b NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1:2001 provides minimal requirements for these issues and the user is ultimately responsible for ensuring the alloy in final fabricated form has adequate resistance to the types of cracking listed in the Scope 1.0 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1:2001. Answer: 3 The ISO Maintenance Panel cannot comment on the suitability of using the 304L SS materials compared to alternative alloys. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-02 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 35:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Gas Compressor https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 36:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Gas Compressor https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 37:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Turbine Generator https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 38:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Turbine Generator https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 39:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Turbine Generator https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 40:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 108. As per NACE MR0175 austenitic stainless steel weldments need to be solution annealed and quenched Question: I am requesting a clarification of intent for comments included in Tables A.2 and A.6 In both of these tables there is a statement "these materials shall also be in the solution-annealed and quenched condition." It is my interpretation that this was a requirement for the base material and was not intended for a fabricated part e.g. a welded compressor housing. We have to complete some fabrications and believe the required heat treatment will cause cracking and distortion of the part--however a part must meet the requirements of MR0175/ISO 15156. Answer: You are correct. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Tables A.2 and A.6 apply to base materials only. The requirements for welding are given in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.2.3 "Welding of austentitic stainless steels of this materials group.“ This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-10 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 41:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang You are correct. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Tables A.2 and A.6 apply to base materials only. The requirements for welding are given in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.2.3 "Welding of austenitic stainless steels of this materials group.“ Welding of austenitic SS in As-Weld Condition https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 42:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.3 Welding of austenitic stainless steels of this materials group The requirements for the cracking-resistance properties of welds shall apply see 6.2.2.  The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and  the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable. Austenitic stainless steel “L” filler metal shall have a maximum carbon content of 003 mass fraction. Weldments may be repair-welded if they meet the welding procedure requirements. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 43:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 109. In NACE MR0175 how are bourdon tubes classified Question: In the latest NACE MR0175 there are two component categories "Instrument tubing and associated compression fittings..." and "Diaphragms pressure measuring devices and pressure seals." To which category does the Bourdon tube belong Answer: Bourdon tubes are not specifically addressed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. The Maintenance Panel cannot meet your request to categorize Bourdon tubes between "Instrument tubing and associated compression fittings..." and "Diaphragms pressure measuring devices and pressure seals." In all cases the material selected must be acceptable to the equipment user for their service conditions. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.2.2 Table A.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2007-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 44:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 110. NACE MR0175 and orbital welding of austenitic stainless steels Question: My stainless steel sheet material qualifies to Section A.2. I am forming this sheet into tubes and longitudinally welding the formed tube without filler metals using an automatic arc welding process ASTM 249/ASTM 269. After welding the tube is fully annealed per ASTM. My hardness values are all below 22 HRC as required. A. Is my welded and annealed tubing bound to the welding requirements of A.2.3 and 6.2.2 B. B. After annealing if I now butt weld two ends of the tubing above using the orbital weld no filler metal process no additional anneal am I now bound to A.2.3 and 6.2.2 Answer: A. Yes this is still a weld even if it was made without filler materials. B. Yes. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.2.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-19 Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 45:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.2.2.2.4 Hardness acceptance criteria for welds Weld hardness acceptance criteria for CRAs or other alloys given in Annex A shall apply to alloys selected using Annex A. Hardness acceptance criteria can also be established from successful cracking-resistance testing of welded samples. Testing shall be in accordance with Annex B. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 46:

https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

slide 47:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 48:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 111. For CRAs in NACE MR0175 how does the 22HRC value convert to other hardness scales Question: In Section of Part 3: Table A.2 austenitic stainless steel states: "These materials shall also -be in the solution-annealed and quenched or annealed and thermally stabilized heat-treatment condition be free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties and -have a maximum hardness of 22 HRC." Whereas for welding in Section A.2.3 it is stated that: "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable." I addition Section 6.2.2.2.2 states that "Hardness testing for welding procedure qualification shall be carried out using Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 methods in accordance with ISO 6507-1 or the Rockwell 15N method in accordance with ISO 6508-1. The use of other methods shall require explicit user approval.“ https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 49:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q1. Please clarify how the requirement for 22 HRC is interpreted in light of this i.e. what Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 or Rockwell 15N value should be used as a maximum for weld HAZ and weld metal On an associated point for solid-solution nickel-based alloys Section A.4 and duplex stainless steels Section A.7 there are no hardness requirements for materials in the solution- annealed condition with the exception of one HIP duplex stainless steel alloy. The relevant sections A.4.3 and A.7.3 on welding state: "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable". Answer 1 NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 provides no guidance for hardness conversion from the Vickers to the Rockwell scales for the austenitic stainless steels which is then left to an agreement between the manufacturer and the equipment user possibly based on conversion tables made using empirical data see ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 Paragraph 2. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 50:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q2. Please confirm that the interpretation that NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 therefore places no hardness restrictions for welds in these materials is correct. Answer: 2 There are no hardness limits for the HAZ of welds of corrosion-resistant alloys when there are no hardness limits in the tables or the text of the document for the base materials. For the weld metal any hardness limit depends on any hardness limit set for the alloy used as consumable. For matching consumables for solid-solution nickel-based alloys Section A.4 and duplex stainless steels Section A.7 there are no hardness limits for weld metal. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.2.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-13 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 51:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.24 — Environmental and materials limits for duplex stainless steels used for any equipment or component No hardness limit mentioned except for HIP Hot isostatic pressure-produced HIP15 duplex stainless steel UNS S31803 30 ≤ FPREN ≤ 400 Mo ≥ 15 shall have a maximum hardness of 25 HRC and shall…… Table A.25 — Environmental and materials limits for duplex stainless steels used as downhole tubular components and as packers and other subsurface equipment. For these applications these materials shall — be in the solution-annealed liquid-quenched and cold-worked condition — have a ferrite content volume fraction of between 35 and 65 and — have a maximum hardness of 36 HRC. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 52:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.7.3 Welding of duplex stainless steels of this materials group The requirements for the cracking-resistance properties of welds shall apply see 6.2.2. The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable. A cross-section of the weld metal HAZ and base metal shall be examined as part of the welding procedure qualification. The microstructure shall be suitably etched and examined at ×400 magnification and shall have grain boundaries with no continuous precipitates. Intermetallic phases nitrides and carbides shall not exceed 10 in total. The sigma phase shall not exceed 05 . The ferrite content in the weld metal root and unreheated weld cap shall be determined in accordance with ASTM E562 and shall be in the range of 30 to 70 volume fraction. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 53:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang For matching consumables for  solid-solution nickel-based alloys Section A.4 and  duplex stainless steels Section A.7 there are no hardness limits for weld metal. Table A.25 — Environmental and materials limits for duplex stainless steels used as downhole tubular components and as packers and other subsurface equipment. For these applications these materials shall — be in the solution-annealed liquid-quenched and cold-worked condition — have a ferrite content volume fraction of between 35 and 65 and — have a maximum hardness of 36 HRC. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 54:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Cross section perpendicular to the axis of the weld showing narrow heat affected zone HAZ. The microstructure in the HAZ consists of larger grains of ferrite and a relatively small volume fraction of austenite. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ http://www.rjlg.com/2014/07/uncovering-mysteries-duplex-stainless-steels/

slide 55:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Cross section perpendicular to the axis of a weld showing as-solidified weld metal. The microstructure consists of acicular austenite light colored phase in a ferrite matrix https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ http://www.rjlg.com/2014/07/uncovering-mysteries-duplex-stainless-steels/

slide 56:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Uncovering the Mysteries of Duplex Stainless Steels As early as the 1930s companies were researching the development of duplex grades of steel that were more resistant to cracking and corrosion but it wasn’t until the 1960s and 1970s when improvement in refining techniques resulted in better product quality that major progress was made. Since that time the use of duplex stainless steels has grown and new grades have entered the market. How these grades react under various conditions is not precisely known since many of these steels are produced by individual companies whose formulations differ. The Duplex Stainless Steel Atlas of Microstructures published by Materials Technology Institute Inc. MTI helps uncover these mysteries with an atlas of instructive high quality images of the microstructures of duplex stainless steels. Written by Jim Pellegrino RJ Lee Group Heather Stine Materials Technology Institute Jim Fritz TMR Stainless/Outokumpu High Performance Stainless and Hira Ahluwalia Materials Selection Resources/Nickel Institute the atlas discloses seldom-seen images of duplex-alloy grade product forms that include flat rolled and tubular products with and without welds and cast forged and HIP materials that have been exposed to various thermal treatments and more. Simplifying the Duplex . . . through Images Duplex stainless steels have a two-phase microstructure containing both ferrite and austenite–a combination that results in a variety of superior properties such as high corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. However despite their advantages duplex stainless steels are also known for a complicated microstructure that makes them more difficult to produce and fabricate. They are often subject to precipitation of phases that are detrimental and may adversely impact both strength and corrosion resistance. It is important to reveal and evaluate these properties and their microstructure to understand their relationships to each other. To better understand these relationships MTI member companies prepared and donated samples of various stainless steel grades and products to RJ Lee Group’s laboratory for metallographic analysis. More than 100 samples which included specimens as-produced annealed and those artificially aged in used materials were metallographically prepared and examined using optical microscopy scanning electron microscopy SEM and scanning electronmicroscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy EDS. Some of the samples were heat treated and all were photo-documented at RJ Lee Group’s headquarters laboratory to show how the microstructure was impacted. Jim Pellegrino recognized steel expert shot thousands of optical and electron images analyzed samples and contributed to portions of the text. A variety of etchants have historically been used to selectively reveal matrix phases and second-phase constituents but to better understand the complicated microstructure of the samples he developed a special etchant Pellegrino’s Etchant which he used to examine the samples. Using this etchant he was able to control the etch depth so that when necessary and depending on the alloy content the etchant could be modified so that it was slow acting allowing him to investigate secondary phases and reveal not only the general microstructure but also carbides nitrides and the intermetallics in the samples. Anyone who needs to understand the microstructure and behavior of available duplex stainless steels will find this atlas to be an expert handbook. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ http://www.rjlg.com/2014/07/uncovering-mysteries-duplex-stainless-steels/

slide 57:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 112. For austenitic stainless steels 304 316/316L etc is there a limit of cold work in NACE MR0175 Question: In several paragraphs of both NACE MR0175 and ISO 15156 it is stated that materials e.g. austenitic SS are acceptable if they are free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties or is stated "in the annealed or solution-annealed condition only" e.g. Ni-based only. Question: Is there a limit to what is considered cold work e.g. 5 or is any cold work whatsoever included answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 does not prohibit all cold work of the austenitic stainless steels it prohibits cold work intended to enhance mechanical properties. A limit for the percentage of cold work is not provided. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.3 and A.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-28 Q1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 58:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 113. If hydrotesting induces cold deformation is this acceptable as per NACE MR0175 Question: In order to decrease the danger of low stress creep we slightly overstress superaustenitic SS and Ni-based alloy valve bodies during hydrotesting. This overstressing causes a "cold deformation" of 0.2-0.5. We do not use the cold deformation in order to enhance the mechanical properties Is this practice allowed under the rules of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 \ Answer: Hydrotesting the austenitic stainless steels to the appropriate industry or design code is acceptable. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.3 and A.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-28 Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 59:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 114. Is alloy 600 UNS N06600 included in NACE MR0175 Currently Alloy 600 UNS N06600 is not listed in NACE MR0175. Question: Your name was given to me as someone that might be able to help sort out an issue that was raised by one of my co-workers. At one point many years ago alloy 600 UNS N06600 was included in MR0175 as a specific alloy that could be used in NACE applications. For some reason along the way with the revisions between 2002/2003 and the changeover to ISO 15156 it has been left out or removed on purpose. However I was not able to find out specifically what happened to alloy 600. A friend did a search of ISO 15156 and found a query on the same topic 2011-03 on UNS N06600 with the same question as mine. The proposed response was as listed below: “N06600 is not listed in 15156 as an acceptable alloy. There is currently a ballot proposal to introduce UNS N06600 back into NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Standard. According to ISO 15156 rules this ballot will have to pass votes from the Maintenance Panel and the Oversight Committee to be accepted”. No records of the proposed ballot were found. Not sure what happened to this. I was told that my inquiry should be sent to you to be able to get the formal inquiry recorded and entered into the NACE system so that the Maintenance Panel would be able to investigate. I do appreciate your help. If you have any questions please let me know. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 60:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: Item 4 in Minutes of meeting from San Antonio MP meeting: Nickel Alloy 600 ballot. Alloy 600 was in the previous version of MR0175 and left off in translation into 15156. The proposal was to relist without limits in annealed conditions with 35 HRC maximum. The ballot submitter was asked to resubmit with data or use history we have not had a reply as of this meeting. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 61:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang San Antonio https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 62:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 115. NACE MR0175 Table A.6 does it cover pressure gauges transmitters diaphragms etc Question: Our inquiry is regarding Table A.6 in which the material and environmental limits for instrumentation and control devices are described. The note b in Table A.6 only provides an indication of possible components that fall in this category diaphragms pressure measuring device and pressure seals. However we do not fully understand if the following instruments also fall in this category. - pressure gauges with bourdon tube or diaphragms - diaphragm seals/chemical seals - electronic pressure transmitters - electric and mechanical temperature measuring devices - Accessories o Restrictor Overpressure protector o Thermowell solid machined fabricated o Syphon o Cooling tower Do you agree that the above mentioned instruments fall in the category as noted in Table A.6. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 63:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: Table A.6 includes instrumentation and control devices that have been used so far without known failures in sour service. It is up to the Manufacturer to assess if the use of austenitic stainless steel instrumentation and control devices used for compressors are included in Table A.6. The Maintenance Panel cannot give advice on specific design issues. The applicability of Table A.6 to specific components must be agreed between the user and manufacturer. You are encouraged to submit a ballot to revise/clarify Table A.6. This ballot should include field history as prescribed in 15156-1 clause 8.2. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.6 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 64:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 116. What are the NACE MR0175 limits for UNS J93254 A351 CK3MCuN Question: We have requirement of 6Mo valves for one of our ongoing projects wherein we need to use A 351 CK3MCuN J 93254 body material. With reference to Table A -8 of NACE MR0175/ISO-15156 - 2003 Environmental and materials limits for highly alloyed austenitic steels used for any equipment or components we have following clarification: T able A - 8 lists the above material J 93254 ASTM A 351 CK3MCuN can be used for any combinations of temperature pH2S chloride concentration and in situ pH occurring in production environments are acceptable. We understand that forging grade equivalent of above J 93254 which is UNS 31254 will also be qualified under these conditions. Please confirm /clarify the whether forging grade equivalent of J 93254 which is UNS 31254 will also be qualified Answer: Table A.8 is the subject of an amendment proposal that has been accepted by the ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel by NACE TG 299 ISO 15156 Oversight Committee and by ISO TC67 WG7 and will now go forward for publication. The revision involves limits being placed upon the application of UNS J93254. Publication of this document can be expected within the coming year. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.3.2 T able A.8 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 65:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.8 — Environmental and materials limits for highly-alloyed austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 66:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 117. In NACE MR0175 Table A.2 are the chemistry requirements additive Question: We have a question regarding the meaning of a sentence in Paragraph 4.4 in MR0175-2003. This same sentence is repeated in Paragraph 10.2.1. 62 The paragraph states: Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels in this category are those with Ni + 2 Mo 30 and 2 Mo minimum. A1. Does the statement mean that there are essentially two groups in this category Such that . . . One qualifying group consists of materials that contain N + 2 Mo 30 Another qualifying group consists of any austenitic stainless steel with 2 Mo minimum such as 316 317. A2. Or does the statement mean that there must be a minimum of 2 Mo in the Ni + 2 Mo 30 requirement Since the environmental restrictions in Paragraph 4.4 are the same as in 4.2 where most austenitics are acceptable I assume A1 is the correct interpretation since this would allow for inclusion of 316 and 317. answer: Your answer A2 is correct. The chemistry requirements are additive. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.3.2 T able A.8 and T able A.9 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-15

slide 67:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 118. Is UNS N08020 listed in NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 Question: I am looking for a definitive interpretation of NACE MR0175 concerning nickel-based alloys. My company produces alloy 20 UNS N08020. The standard ASTM/AMS/UNS composition is listed in Table D3 on pg. 65 showing a Mo range of 2.0-3.0. Section A.4 of MR0175 contains Table A.12--Materials types of solid solution nickel-based alloys. This table does not list any specific alloys but it does list the minimum Mo which I assume is for compliance with the standard at 2.5. Does that mean that in order to certify our 20Cb3 to MR0175 the heat must have at least 2.5 Mo even though the acceptable Mo range is 2.0-3.0 If so what is the impetus behind requiring a higher Mo range than is standard for the alloy Answer: You are correct a minimum of 2.5 Mo is required for N08020 to be compliant with Table A.12 material types 4a and 4c. Heats of N08020 not meeting the 2.5 Mo minimum may be acceptable as "Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels" under the limits provided in Tables A.8 A.9 and/or A.11. The 2.5 Mo restriction for N08020 is similar to the PREN restrictions for Duplex Stainless steels. The full chemistry ranges of the UNS numbers listed in the Annex D tables are for reference only. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 T able A.12 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-07 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 68:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 119. Is NiMo16Cr16Ti TUV Specification 429 09.2002 Material No 2.4610 qualified to NACE MR0175 Question: We produce a highly corrosion resistant NiMo 16 Cr 16 Ti alloy to the German TUV Specification 429 09.2002 Material No 2.4610. Could you please confirm that this material complies with the requirements for materials Types 4b and 4e of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156:2009 Part 3 Annex A T able A.12 Answer: If in addition to the TUV specification this material also satisfies the requirements of UNS N06455 with a minimum chromium content of 14.5 it does comply with the requirements for Type 4b and 4e provided the metallurgical conditions defined in Table A.12 are also fulfilled. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 T able A.12 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 69:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 120. Alloy UNS N06625 Alloy 625 and compliance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 quenched off the hammer or separate annealing Question: Is Alloy N06625 Name - Alloy 625 material meet NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.13 if forged material is quenched off the hammer as opposed to performing a separate annealing Answer: It is up to the Manufacturer to determine if alloy 625 is annealed under these conditions. It is not the role of the MP to answer metallurgical questions. If alloy 625 is annealed then it meets requirements of Table A.13. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 T able A.12 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-02

slide 70:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 121. ISO 13680 and NACE MR0175 have different hardness limits for solid solution nickel based alloys which one to follow Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Table A.14 Environmental and materials limits for annealed and cold worked solid-solution nickel-based alloys used as any equipment or components at the bottom indicates "The maximum hardness value for these alloys in these applications shall be 40 HRC." 2. ISO 13680 Table C.27 Example for PSL-2 product mechanical properties at room temperature indicates Mean Hardness Number of 33 or 35 HRC depending on the grade Category 3. These are vastly different values--I appreciate your thoughts. Answer: The MP can only answer about NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Standard. The maximum hardness values correspond to the maximum hardness values of the tested materials. The MP cannot comment on hardness values from other ISO standards like ISO 13680. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.14 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-10 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 71:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 122. Is the hardness testing survey required as part of the welding procedure qualification for solid solution nickel-based alloys as addressed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 welded with solid- solution nickel-based weld metal Question: See A.2.3 MP inquiry 2005-13. This question relates to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 3 Appendix A Paragraph A.4.3. Is the hardness testing survey required as part of the welding procedure qualification for solution heat-treated nickel-based alloys welded with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal In accordance with A.4.3 there are no hardness requirements. A.4.3 Welding solid-solution nickel-based alloys of this materials group. The requirements for the cracking-resistance properties of welds shall apply see 6.2.2. The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable. There are no hardness requirements for welding solid-solution nickel-based alloys with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal. Answer: No. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-06

slide 72:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.4.2 Environmental and materials limits for the uses of solid-solution nickel- based alloys Table A.13 — Environmental and materials limits for solid-solution nickel-based alloys used in any equipment or component  Wrought or cast solid-solution nickel-based products made from alloys of types 4a and 4b shall be in the solution-annealed r annealed condition.  UNS N04400 and UNS N04405 shall have a maximum hardness of 35 HRC.  Wellhead and christmas tree components shall also be in accordance with ISO 10423. a No data submitted to ascertain whether these materials are acceptable for service in the presence of elemental sulfur in the environment.

slide 73:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 123. Whats NACE MR0175 of ferritic stainless steels Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 section A.5.1 and Table D.5 concerning ferritic stainless steels refer to “some alloys of this type” Given that Table D.5 is stated to not be all-inclusive can I rightfully construe that any stainless alloy that meets the definition of “ferritic stainless steel” under definition 3.6 can be used under the conditions of Table A.17 Answer: Yes any stainless steel that meets the definition of "ferritic stainless steels" under 3.6 can be used under conditions of Table A.17. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-10Q1

slide 74:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.5 Ferritic stainless steels identified as material type A.5.1 Materials chemical compositions Table D.5 lists the chemical compositions of some alloys of this type. A.5.2 Environmental and materials limits for the uses of ferritic stainless steels

slide 75:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 124. Are free-machining ferritic stainless steels allowed in NACE MR0175 Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 sections A.2.1 A.3.1 and A.6.1 each forbid the use of their respective steels in “free-machining” grades. However this requirement is notably lacking in section A.5.1 regarding ferritic stainless steels. Can I rightfully construe that there is no mistake here and that free-machining ferritic stainless grades are therefore allowed under the conditions of Table A.17 Answer: Even though not specifically stated in the current standard no free machining ferrous alloys including stainless steels are acceptable. This applies also for ferritic stainless steels. SUPPLIMENTARY INFORMATION A search through historical answers to interpretations has revealed two instances where the interpretation has been that free machining covers all ferrous alloys including stainless steels and these are unacceptable there have been no interpretations that have permitted the use of free machining steels including ferritic stainless steels. We will investigate wording changes through ballot or editorial means to clarify this. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-10Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 76:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 125. Is CA6NM acceptable per MR0175/ISO 15156 at a hardness of max 255 BHN Question: My inquiry concerns CA6NM: Earlier editions of the NACE standard contain a note stating that the hardness correlation in ASTM E 140 doesn’t apply to CA6NM and that for this material the maximum permissible value in Brinell is 255 BHN. In NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 this statement is no longer used. However Paragraph 7.3.2 of NACE MR01756/ISO 15156-2 stipulates that users can establish hardness correlations for individual materials. Please see below: Quote For ferritic steels EFC Publication 16 shows graphs for the conversion of hardness readings from Vickers HV to Rockwell HRC and from Vickers HV to Brinell HBW derived from the tables of ASTM E 140 and BS 860. Other conversion tables also exist. Users may establish correlations for individual materials. Unquote Finally the questions: Is CA6NM acceptable per MR0175/ISO 15156 at a hardness of max 255 BHN which has been empirically determined to be the equivalent of 23 HRC but which on the ASTM E 140 scale corresponds to about 25 HRC

slide 77:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: The prescribed hardness limit of 23 HRC for CA6NM in Table A.18 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 utilizes the Rockwell C scale as the basis for acceptance. Conversions to other hardness scales are no longer included in the standard. Other hardness scales may still be used provided a correlation can be shown between the scale used and the prescribed Rockwell C scale for the particular material being tested. As stated in Paragraph 6.2.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 conversion between hardness scales is material- dependent. The ISO Maintenance Panel cannot make this conversion for you. The user may establish the required conversion tables. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 T able A.18 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-18 Q1

slide 78:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 126. Does NACE MR0175 allow additional heat treatment for stress relief of CA6NM and F6NM Question: I have a question regarding NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. On Table A.18 the heat treatment requirements for CA6NM and F6NM are listed. Is this the only approved heat treatment If we follow this heat treatment initially are other heat treatments allowed as long as they do not exceed the original Were trying to find out if a supplemental stress relieve is acceptable to try and lower the material hardness. Answer: Only the heat treatments listed are currently acceptable. Other heat treatments may be qualified in accordance with the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex B. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2. Table A.18 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-19 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 79:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 127. Is UNS J91153 NACE MR0175 approved Question: In Part 3 A.6.2 Table A.18 under note a it lists the cast equivalents of the wrought alloys CA15 CA15M but under note c it says cast or wrought S42000 but does not mention the cast equivalent CA40. So the question is: can I say UNS J91153 is compliant with NACE Answer: Early versions of MR0175 did not include UNS S42000 in either the cast or wrought form but S41000 and the cast alloys CA15 and CA15M were included. Wrought S42000 was balloted in 1994. When ISO 15156 was being developed the statement including "cast or wrought S42000" was added. There was previously a cast version of S42000 J91201 but that has been withdrawn from the UNS numbering system. Since a cast version of S42000 was never balloted and the casting alloy your inquiry specifies J91153 is chemically different from S42000 it is not correct to claim that J91153 meets ISO 15156-3. A ballot would be required to change this. See ISO 15156-3 Annex B for CRA testing and balloting guidance. The ballot form is available on the ISO Web site www.iso.org/iso15156maintenance in the document "Introduction to ISO 15156 Maintenance Activities" Annex C. A.6.2 Table A.18 and Table A.23 This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 T able A.18 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-09 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 80:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 128. In NACE MR0175 CRA tables whats the difference between "any equipment and component" and all the other tables Question: Inconsistency between Table A.18 and A.23 of Para. A.6.2 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Table A.18 allows martensitic stainless steels for any equipment or component but Table A.23 excludes casing and tubing hanger and valve stems. What is the meaning of any equipment or component Does any equipment or component from Table A.18 exclude casing and tubing hangers and valve stems https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 81:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: No ISO 15156-3 Tables A.18 and A.23 set different H2S limits for the same selection of martensitic stainless steels. The other environmental limits are the same. Table A.18 addresses the use of the materials under the environmental limits of this table. "Any equipment or component" includes wellhead and tree components and valve and choke components and casing and tubing hangers and valve stems. Table A.23 allows the use of the same selection of materials for wellhead and tree components and valve and choke components under a less restrictive set of environmental conditions but excludes casing and tubing hangers and valve stems under these less restrictive conditions. Please see Table 1 of NACE MR0175/ISO15156-3 for the list of equipment covered by this standard and also "General Remarks" under ISO 15156-3 A.1.6 of this "Inquiries and interpretations" document. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 Table A.18 and Table A.23 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-23 Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 82:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 129. In NACE MR0175 what is the API 5CT L-80 Type 13Cr hardness limit Question: Is the maximum hardness limit for ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing used as a downhole tubular component packer and other subsurface equipment in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 the maximum hardness as specified in the latest edition of ISO 11960 Note: ISO 11960 is also designated as API 5CT. Note: ISO 11960 currently specifies 23 HRC as the maximum hardness for L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing. Discussion: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.19 lists ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr and two other materials as begin acceptable for "downhole tubular components packers and other subsurface equipment." There are notes in this table that specify the maximum hardness limits of the other two materials individually. However there is no note to specify the maximum hardness limit of ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing. This seems to indicate that ISO 11960 becomes the controlling document for L-80 Type 13 Cr and therefore the maximum hardness for ISO 11960 L- 80 13 Cr tubing is currently 23 HRC as specified in Table C.6 and Table E.6 of ISO 11960. Answer: Your interpretation is correct. As a general rule during the preparation of ISO 15156 the unnecessary repetition of information provided in cited sources was avoided. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 T able A.19 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 83:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.19 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as downhole tubular components and for packers and other subsurface equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 84:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang However there is no note to specify the maximum hardness limit of ISO 11960 L-80 Type 13 Cr tubing. Yet the Hardness limit for martensitic SS applied https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 85:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang SEE Q111/ Q122 On an associated point for solid-solution nickel-based alloys Section A.4 and duplex stainless steels Section A.7 there are no hardness requirements for materials in the solution-annealed condition with the exception of one HIP duplex stainless steel alloy. Answer: 2 There are no hardness limits for the HAZ of welds of corrosion-resistant alloys when there are no hardness limits in the tables or the text of the document for the base materials. For the weld metal any hardness limit depends on any hardness limit set for the alloy used as consumable. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 86:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q111. For CRAs in NACE MR0175 how does the 22HRC value convert to other hardness scales Question: In Section of Part 3: Table A.2 austenitic stainless steel states: "These materials shall also -be in the solution-annealed and quenched or annealed and thermally stabilized heat-treatment condition be free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties and -have a maximum hardness of 22 HRC." Whereas for welding in Section A.2.3 it is stated that: "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable." I addition Section 6.2.2.2.2 states that "Hardness testing for welding procedure qualification shall be carried out using Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 methods in accordance with ISO 6507-1 or the Rockwell 15N method in accordance with ISO 6508-1. The use of other methods shall require explicit user approval.“ https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 87:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q1. Please clarify how the requirement for 22 HRC is interpreted in light of this i.e. what Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 or Rockwell 15N value should be used as a maximum for weld HAZ and weld metal On an associated point for solid-solution nickel-based alloys Section A.4 and duplex stainless steels Section A.7 there are no hardness requirements for materials in the solution- annealed condition with the exception of one HIP duplex stainless steel alloy. The relevant sections A.4.3 and A.7.3 on welding state: "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable". Answer 1 NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 provides no guidance for hardness conversion from the Vickers to the Rockwell scales for the austenitic stainless steels which is then left to an agreement between the manufacturer and the equipment user possibly based on conversion tables made using empirical data see ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 Paragraph 2. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 88:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q2. Please confirm that the interpretation that NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 therefore places no hardness restrictions for welds in these materials is correct. Answer: 2 There are no hardness limits for the HAZ of welds of corrosion-resistant alloys when there are no hardness limits in the tables or the text of the document for the base materials. For the weld metal any hardness limit depends on any hardness limit set for the alloy used as consumable. For matching consumables for solid-solution nickel-based alloys Section A.4 and duplex stainless steels Section A.7 there are no hardness limits for weld metal. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.2.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-13 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 89:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q122. Is the hardness testing survey required as part of the welding procedure qualification for solid solution nickel-based alloys as addressed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 welded with solid- solution nickel-based weld metal Question: See A.2.3 MP inquiry 2005-13. This question relates to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 3 Appendix A Paragraph A.4.3. Is the hardness testing survey required as part of the welding procedure qualification for solution heat-treated nickel-based alloys welded with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal In accordance with A.4.3 there are no hardness requirements. A.4.3 Welding solid-solution nickel-based alloys of this materials group. The requirements for the cracking-resistance properties of welds shall apply see 6.2.2. The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable. There are no hardness requirements for welding solid-solution nickel-based alloys with solid-solution nickel-based weld metal. Answer: No. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-06

slide 90:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 130. NACE MR0175 and HIP materials used in valve components Question: PM HIP materials are used in valve components. The reason we are doing this is that casting quality of high alloy material has been poor and lead times long. The required casting repair process is very expensive as well. Our questions: 1. Do these PM HIP materials fulfill the standard requirements of sour service if they have the same chemical and mechanical properties and heat treatment as their wrought or forged counterparts 2. Do the same environmental limits apply for PM HIP materials as specified for the corresponding wrought alloys in the referred tables Tables referred to are A.24 A.8 A.13 in Part 3. Answer: HIP materials have been separately listed so far as in Tables A.24 and A.33. Their resistance to sour service must be demonstrated by material qualification testing in accordance with ISO 15156-3 Annex B. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Tables A.23 and A.24 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 91:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.24 — Environmental and materials limits for duplex stainless steels used for any equipment or component Hot isostatic pressure-produced HIP15 duplex stainless steel UNS S31803 30 ≤ FPREN ≤ 400 Mo ≥ 15 shall have a maximum hardness of 25 HRC and shall  be in the solution-annealed and water-quenched condition  have a ferrite content volume fraction of between 35 and 65 and  not have undergone ageing heat-treatments. NOTE Higher values of FPREN provide higher corrosion resistance however they also lead to increased risk of sigma- and alpha prime phase formation in the materials’ ferrite phase during manufacture depending on product thickness and achievable quench rate. The ranges of FPREN quoted are typical of those found to minimize the problem of sigma- and alpha-prime phase formation. Table A.33 — Environmental and materials limits for precipitation- hardened nickel-based alloys III used for any equipment or component a UNS N07626 totally dense hot-compacted by a powder metallurgy process shall have a maximum hardness of 40 HRC and a maximum tensile strength of 1 380 MPa 200 ksi and shall be either https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 92:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 131. What does "continuous precipitates" mean in NACE MR0175 Question: See A.2.3 MP inquiry 2005-13. The question is in regard to Appendix A.7 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. In A.7.3 third paragraph it requires that "the microstructure ... shall have grain boundaries with no continuous precipitates". Is there any guidance as to what continuous means For example does it mean continuous throughout the microstructure Our laboratory has reported suspected continuous precipitates "at some locations". Answer: There is no definition of "continuous precipitates" in the standard. An acceptance criterion or other quantitative limit shall be agreed between the manufacturer/supplier and the equipment user. As noted in the WARNING above ISO 15156-3 Scope it is the equipment users responsibility to select the CRAs and other alloys suitable for the intended service. This responsibility includes the selection of specific quality requirements when none are given by the standard. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.7.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-18 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 93:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 132. How to evaluate the microstructure of duplex stainless steels welding for NACE MR0175 Question: ISO 15156-3 A.7.3--Regarding metallographic examination of the microstructure: a Do closely spaced spheroidal precipitates such as grain boundary carbides constitute continuous precipitates b At what spacing would closely spaced spheroidal precipitates be considered continuous c Are the quantification of precipitates intermetallic phases nitrides carbides to be evaluated as a volume fraction relative to the bulk sample d In cases where only grain boundary precipitates are observed is the quantification to be made as a volume fraction relative to the bulk sample or as a lineal fraction relative to grain boundary length e In the absence of intermetallic phases and nitrides does 1 vol. represent the maximum allowable carbide precipitate content f What is a suitable recommended practice or standard by which to perform this quantification Answer: a b e For NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.7.3 it is the responsibility of the equipment user and the manufacturer to set the quantitative standard they wish to follow when this goes beyond the guidance given. c d f It is the responsibility of the equipment user and the manufacturer to agree on the method and acceptance criteria for the measurement of precipitates. This is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.7.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-28 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 94:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 133. Is UNS S66286 acceptable for tubing hanger according to NACE MR0175 Question: What grade of stainless steel meeting NACE requirements can be used for a tubing hanger when the pH is 3.5 My interpretation based on understanding of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Section A.8 T able A.26 is that only UNS S66286 is acceptable. Could you please confirm my statement or correct it Answer: UNS S66286 is the only precipitation-hardenable stainless steel that is acceptable for tubing hangers in environments with pH 3.5. The martensitic stainless steels are also not acceptable for environments with pH 3.5. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8 T able A.26 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-13 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 95:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 134. What are the NACE MR0175 limits for UNS S66286 Question: Table A.26 limits the precipitation-hardened austenitic steel UNS S66286 to 150°F and 15 psi H2S when chlorides are present. a Can this material be used at higher temperature if no chlorides are present Answer No it may not. The table states that the temperature restriction is for "Any combinations of chlorides . . . " NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 does not define the expected performance of UNS S66286 in environments containing no chlorides. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8 T able A.26 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-02 Qa https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 96:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 135. What are the NACE MR0175 requirements for Gr. 660 subsea bolting external to the production wellbore Question: Does NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.26 apply to Gr. 660 material used in subsea bolting applications external to the production wellbore environment when indirectly heated above 150°F Answer: Table A.26 does not apply to Grade 660 material used in subsea bolting applications external to the production wellbore environment. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8 T able A.26 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-09Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 97:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 136. In NACE MR0175 Are 17-4PH hangers considered "subsurface equipment" Question: Reference: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.27--Environmental and materials limits for martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steels used for wellhead and christmas tree components excluding bodies and bonnets valves and chokes excluding bodies and bonnets and packers and other subsurface equipment API 6A makes a distinction between hangers and body components. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 doesnt define either. This has led to some confusion regarding whether or not UNS S17400 material may be used as hangers in a sour environment. Q1. Does the exclusion of wellhead "bodies and bonnets" in Table A.27 also mean that hangers are excluded Q2. Are hangers considered "subsurface equipment" in the context of Table A.27 Q3. Does Table A.27 prohibit the use of UNS S17400 material for hangers in sour service https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 98:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: A1. No it does not. A2. In the context of Table A.27 hangers are more commonly considered to be covered by the term "wellhead and christmas tree components." A3. No it does not provided the environmental limits and metallurgical requirements of Table A.27 are followed. See also response to MP Inquiry 2006-07 posted under ISO 15156-3 Table A.3. This is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8.2 T able A.27 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 99:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.27 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steels used for wellhead and christmas tree components excluding bodies and bonnets valves and chokes excluding bodies and bonnets and packers and other subsurface equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 100:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 101:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Christmas Tree https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 102:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Christmas Tree Subsea

slide 103:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Well Head https://www.slideshare.net/MohamedAbozeima/wellheads-and-christmas-tree-types-and-fuctions

slide 104:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 105:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 137. What is the NACE MR0175 hardness limit for 17-4PH Question: We have a requirement to supply NACE-compliant control valves for the oil and gas industry. One of our internal components is a part made from UNS S17400 17-4 PH details of which are described in Table A27 of Part 3 of the standard. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 states this material should have a maximum hardness of 33 HRC after one of the following heat treatment processes: HEAT TREATMENT DOUBLE AGE- HARDENING PROCESS 1 - SOLUTION-ANNEAL AT 1040±14°C AND AIR COOL OR LIQUID-QUENCH TO BELOW 32°C - FIRST PRECIPITATION-HARDENING CYCLE AT 620±14°C FOR 4 HRS MINIMUM AT TEMPERATURE THEN AIR-COOL OR LIQUID-QUENCH TO BELOW 32°C - SECOND PRECIPITATION- HARDENING CYCLE AT 620±14°C FOR 4 HRS MINIMUM AT TEMPERATURE THEN AIR-COOL OR LIQUID-QUENCH TO BELOW 32°C 2- SOLUTION-ANNEAL AT 1040±14°C AND AIR COOL OR LIQUID- QUENCH TO BELOW 32°C - FIRST PRECIPITATION-HARDENING CYCLE AT 760±14°C FOR 2 HRS MINIMUM AT TEMPERATURE THEN AIR-COOL OR LIQUID-QUENCH TO BELOW 32°C - SECOND PRECIPITATION-HARDENING CYCLE AT 620±14°C FOR 4 HRS MINIMUM AT TEMPERATURE THEN AIR- COOL OR LIQUID-QUENCH TO BELOW 32°C. Ultimately we are trying to establish if these components are still compliant and if not what we can do to rework the parts. Other materials such as 316 state an annealing process but there is not one for UNS S17400. In addition the components are “delicate” in design so post- machining heat treatment is probably not desirable due to component distortion. What does the hardness of 33 HRC refer to wrought bar or finished component What if anything can we do to rework these parts if the hardness value refers to the finished machined condition Answer The 33 HRC max. hardness is applicable to the finished component. The MP does not provide consulting service for material processing issues. This is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8.2 T able A.27 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-16 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 106:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 138. What are the NACE MR0175 limits for UNS S17400 safety relief valves and subsurface equipment Question: Use of SST 17-4 PH UNS S17400 material for NACE is listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Tables A.27 A.28 and A.30. Only Table A.27 contains limitations for partial pressure H2S and PH. Questions: 1 For surface safety relief valves with internal components made of SST 17-4 PH heat treated and hardness tested to limits specified do the limits of Table A.27 or A.28 apply Internal components are considered non-pressure retaining by definition 3.4 in Part 2. However failure of an internal component can cause release of service fluid to the valve outlet. It is assumed for NACE applications that safety relief valves for NACE service would not be vented to atmosphere. 2 Does Part 3 Table A.28 only apply to subsurface equipment or does it apply to all valves Answer: The equipment user is responsible for defining the intended service environment and selecting materials in accordance with this standard. This is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8.2 T able A.27 A.28 and A.30 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-17 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 107:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 139. What does "17-4PH service tool applications mean" in NACE MR0175 Table A.28 Question: Can you provide clarification on NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.28: “UNS S17400 …. has been used in service tool applications at the surface when stressed at less than 60 of its minimum specified yield strength under working conditions.” This Table also lists “Internal Components for Valves Pressure Regulators and Level Controllers”. What exactly do service tool applications encompass Answer: This paragraph is intended to apply to components that are temporarily installed at the surface as part of routine well servicing. For example components of wireline valves used during a wireline job are considered as service tools. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8.2 Table A.28 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-32 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 108:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.28 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steels used as non-pressure- containing internal-valve pressure-regulator and level controller components and miscellaneous equipment

slide 109:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 140. in NACE MR0175 is UNS S17400 acceptable for use in compressors Question: NACE MR0175/ISO15156-3T able A.30: Are wrought UNS S17400 and S15500 martensitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steels that meet the hardness and heat-treat requirements of this Table acceptable for use in compressors in sour environments with no environmental limits with respect to chloride content partial pressure of H2S temperature and free elemental sulfur QUESTION: If the answer to the former question is no what are the specific environmental limits Answer: Yes they are acceptable with no environmental limits in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Table A.30. No data have been submitted to verify resistance to cracking in the presence of elemental sulfur. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.8.2 Table A.30 Reference : ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-34 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 110:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.30 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic precipitation-hardened stainless steels used in compressor components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 111:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 141. NACE MR0175 requirements for 718 springs Question: We are having some discussions with a user who tells us that Table A.32 ‘Environmental and materials limits for precipitation-hardened nickel-based alloys used for any equipment or component’ can be referred to for spring materials and therefore Inconel N07718 can be used for spring as long as it is solution-annealed and aged to a maximum hardness of 40 HRC. However the Table A.36 ‘Environmental and materials limits for precipitation-hardened nickel-based alloys used as springs’ does not list N07718. How should I interpret these tables for nickel-based alloys springs Can I follow table A.32 Answer: Materials listed in 15156-3 Table A.32 are acceptable for “any equipment or component” including springs. Other materials from other “any equipment or components” tables may also be acceptable for springs if used within the metallurgical and environment limits specified in the applicable tables. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.9.2 Table A.32 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 112:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.31 — Environmental and materials limits for precipitation- hardened nickel-based alloys I used for any equipment or component https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 113:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 142. Does NACE MR0175 apply to springs that are plastically deformed not more than 1 or 2 strain Question: Does NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 apply when areas of a spring are plastically deformed not more than 1 or 2 strain Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 does not apply to design made with plastic deformation criteria as written in Paragraph 5 of Part 1. Qualification through testing or field experience may be used to qualify this type of design but this will be outside the limits of the standard. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.39 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-05 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 114:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 does not apply to design made with plastic deformation criteria https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 115:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 143. NACE MR0175 limits for UNS R30003 Question: Why does NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 Part 3 specifically demand age- hardening although age-hardening typically increases the hardness of UNS R30003 Is this because problems were reported when the material was not age-hardened because data is only available for age-hardened material or another reason Answer: In Table A.39 the cold worked + age hardened condition of UNS R30003 was the only condition originally balloted and accepted. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.39 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-05 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 116:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 144. Are UNS C72900 and C96900 NACE MR0175 approved Question: Because UNS C72900 and C96900 are copper alloys are they by definition covered by NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.12 which basically states copper alloys are suitable for use without restriction other than as noted in the footnote which informs the user that such materials may exhibit accelerated general weight-loss corrosion in some sour environments Answer: Yes the UNS C72900 and UNS C96900 copper alloys are included in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.12. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.12 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-21 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 117:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 145. What are the NACE MR0175 electrode requirements for 625 overlay welding what about dilution Reference: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause A.13.1 Corrosion-resistant claddings linings and overlays The first sentence of Clause A.13.1 states: “The materials listed and defined in Clauses A.2 to A.11 may be used as corrosion-resistant claddings linings or as weld overlay materials.” The fifth paragraph of Clause A.13.1 as stated below recognizes that dilution of the weld metal with the substrate occurs during welding. “Dilution of an overlay during application that can impact on its corrosion resistance or mechanical properties should be considered.” Discussion: While the composition of a starting filler metal electrode may meet the composition requirements of an applicable UNS alloy listed in Clause A.2 to A.11 the as-deposited filler metal may be diluted as noted in the fifth paragraph of A.13.1 to the point where it no longer falls within the applicable UNS alloy’s composition range. For example a starting electrode for a 625 weld overlay may meet the composition requirements of UNS N00625 but API 6A 625 overlay made to class FE10 allows an iron content in the as-deposited filler metal of up to 10.0 which exceeds the 5.0 maximum iron limit in UNS 06625. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 118:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang QUESTIONS: Q1: Does the as-deposited filler metal have to comply with the UNS composition of the starting electrode ANSWER: ISO15156-3 does not state anything specific about the composition of the as- deposited filler metal. It does state that dilution can affect the corrosion resistance. The purpose of an overlay has historically been for corrosion resistance and not cracking resistance. If the enquirer wishes to consider the overlay as a barrier for cracking resistance a ballot is required to define cracking limits for a specific as deposited composition for a define location within the weld. Q2: If the answer to Q1 is yes then what locations within a weld must meet the UNS composition allowing for some dilution ANSWER: This issue is not addressed by this standard. See answer to Q1. Q3: Does a 625 overlay made to the prescribed API 6A requirements for FE10 meet NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 ANSWER: The standard does not define the cracking limits for as-deposited filler material beyond the UNS compositions. See answer to Q1 This is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.13.1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 119:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 146. Is ASTM A 995 Grade 4A UNS J92205 22 Cr duplex listed in NACE MR0175 Question 1: It is our understanding of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 that provided ASTM A 995 Grade 4A UNS J92205 22 Cr duplex stainless steel complies with the material limits of Table A.24 of Annex A it can be selected for use in H2S- containing environments provided the environmental limits given in Table A.24 are not exceeded. Answer: Your understanding is correct. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-04Q1 Question 2 : It does not ALSO have to be listed in Annex D Table D7 which we believe is for information only and lists only SOME duplex stainless steels. Answer: You are correct. This is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex D Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-04Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 120:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.7 Duplex stainless steels identified as material types A.7.1 Materials chemical compositions Table D.7 lists the chemical compositions of some duplex stainless steel alloys that can but do not necessarily meet the restrictions of this materials group. In some cases more restrictive chemistries than those shown in Table D.7 are needed. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 121:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 147. According to NACE what is the correct chemistry of inconel 625 UNS N06625 Question: For the interpretation question of NACE spec MR0175-3 table D.3 Inco 625 alloy chemistry. I believe it is a "typo" but need your concurrence or interpretation if it is not a "typo". Table D.3 as attached below lists Inco 625 chemistry as Nb max weight 3.15 to 4.15. Typical Inco 625 would have Tantalum in addition to Niobium and typical mill chemistry would specify Nb + Ta as 3.15 to 4.15 instead of Nb only. Industry standard spec ASTM B446 chemistry for Inco 625 bars specifies Nb + Ta as 3.15 to 4.15 instead of Nb only. So the question to you or to NACE is as follows: 1. Is it a "typo" in the NACE spec and it should be interpreted as Nb + Ta as 3.15 to 4.15 instead of Nb only as specified in the MR0175 spec 2. If it is not "typo" is there any technical reason why Tantalum would not be accepted as part of standard Inco 625 chemistry Answer: 1 No. 15156-3 Annex D is an INFORMATIVE annex. ISO 15156 specifies material requirements for specific material groups or UNS numbers. The chemistries of these UNS numbers are established by the international standards organizations that maintain the UNS. Annex D lists chemical composition data using the values and elements defined by UNS. It should be noted that the compositions listed in Annex D have no effect on the NORMATIVE composition limits in Table A.12. 2 The scope of the MP is limited to interpretation to wording in ISO 15156. The technical reason for tantalum not being included in Annex D for UNS N06625 is as stated above the standard adopted the UNS chemistries. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table D.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 122:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 148. If a weld is qualified to NACE MR0175 is NACE TM0177 required Question: About welds in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Item 7.3.3.4 "hardness acceptance criteria for welds" "weld hardness acceptance criteria for steels selected using option 1 see 7.1 shall be as specified in A.2.1.4. Alternative weld hardness acceptance criteria may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B." So in our understanding if our welding procedure qualifications WPSs are qualified in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Item A.2.1.4 it is not necessary to test them according to NACE TM0177. We would like you to confirm whether our interpretation below is correct and if not give us the correct interpretation. Answer: Your interpretation is correct. Note: Consumable with Nickel 1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 123:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 and NACE TM0177--WELDS On the other hand if we make the test in accordance with NACE TM0177 in our WPSs that are previously qualified to conform to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 what kind of results will we have Will we have necessary or redundant results Answer: A manufacturer may choose to qualify a welding procedure specification in accordance with ANNEX B. Testing welds acceptable in accordance with A.2.1.4 is an optional activity chosen by the manufacturer to confirm resistance to cracking. This is not necessarily a redundant result depending on the anticipated service conditions and the selected test environment the results could be used: 1. to confirm that the hardness control specified in A.2.1.4 is adequate to prevent sulfide stress cracking 2. or to define alternative weld hardness control requirements that will not lead to sulfide stress cracking when the requirements of A.2.1.4 are not met. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-08 Q1 Q2 and Q3 This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 7 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 124:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 149. NACE MR0175 and the maximum allowable case depth for nitriding to 0.006". Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2:2015 A.2.1.5 limits the maximum allowable case depth for nitriding to 0.006". Case depth is not defined in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 and there are multiple definitions of case depth that are possible. Which of the following definitions of case depth is intended here a The total case depth determined by metallographic analysis b The effective case depth based on a difference of 50 HV between core and case c The effective case depth based on a difference of 10 between core and case d The effective case depth based on manufacturer spec of case hardness criteria e Other – if so please explain ANSWER: The measurement of case depth is not defined in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Adding a definition of the measurement criteria requires a ballot. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-01 This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.2.1.5 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 125:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 150. NACE MR0175 and the requirements for HSC GHSC and SSC Question: HSC describes cracking in metals that are not sensitive to SSC but which can be embrittled by hydrogen when galvanically coupled as the cathode to another metal that is corroding actively as an anode. The term “galvanically induced HSC” has been used for this mechanism of cracking. It means HSC is the same as "galvanically induced HSC" and different from SSC. But in NACE MR0175-1 clause 3.23 SSC is a form of hydrogen stress cracking HSC and involves the embrittlement of the metal by atomic hydrogen that is produced by acid corrosion on the metal surface. It means SSC is a type of HSC. The words from two paragraphs are contradictory. I think the words should be understood as below. There are two types of HSC. One is "galvanically induced HSC” it is abbreviated as GHSC because in NACE MR0175-3 clause 3.7the definition galvanically induced hydrogen stress cracking cracking that results due to the presence of hydrogen in a metal induced in the cathode of a galvanic couple and tensile stress residual and/or applied The other one is "Sulfide induced HSC" .e.g "Sulfide Stress Crack"SSC because in NACE MR0175-1 clause 3.23 the definition is as below. SSC is a form of hydrogen stress cracking HSC and involves the embrittlement of the metal by atomic hydrogen that is produced by acid corrosion on the metal surface. Hydrogen uptake is promoted in the presence of sulfides. The atomic hydrogen can diffuse into the metal reduce ductility and increase susceptibility to cracking. High strength metallic materials and hard weld zones are prone to SSC. Please help me if my understanding about HSC GHSC and SSC right or not https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 126:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: We thank you for your inquiry and agree that there is some confusion in the notes to these definitions. The HSC includes cracking in metals that are not sensitive to SSC but which can be embrittled by hydrogen when galvanically coupled as the cathode to another metal that is corroding actively as an anode. The term “galvanically induced HSC” has been used for this mechanism of cracking. We believe that this can be clarified by a ballot on our definitions we are initiating the ballot process. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 3.1.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-02 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 127:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 151. is 3D printing considered within the scope of NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 Can you please clarify if metal additive manufacturing also referred as 3D printing is a manufacture process considered within the scope of NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 If the answer is negative can you clarify if a material/alloy that is listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 as acceptable for a certain environment and under certain metallurgical conditions is also considered acceptable when processed by 3D printing provided hardness limits are observed E.g. if alloy UNS N07718 is listed as acceptable in the cast condition to a maximum hardness of 40HRC would a N07718 component processed by 3D printing and with hardness below 40HRC is considered to meet the requirements of NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 Q1: Is metal additive manufacturing also referred to a 3D metal printing a manufacturing process defined or included in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 A1: 3D metal printing/metal additive manufacturing is not defined in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Q2: If the answer to Q1 is no would a currently listed alloy be acceptable for a specific application if manufactured through 3D printing and final hardness limits were within requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 A2: In itself this is not sufficient because 3D metal printing/metal additive manufacturing is not defined as an acceptable process route. Q3: If the answer to Q2 is no would UNS N07718 manufactured through 3D printing be acceptable within the restrictions of the cast condition for UNS N07718 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 T able A.31 or T able A.32 A.3: The same answer to Q2 applies here it is not known whether the 3D printed condition is equivalent to the cast condition defined for this alloy. To be acceptable the production route would need to qualify in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Appendix B. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.2 and A.2.2.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 128:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 152. NACE MR0175 and cold work of 316L and other austenitic stainless steels. With reference to NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-3 2015 I am querying one of the comments under Note b applicable to UNS S31603 in the notes section of Table A.2 which states “after the final solution annealing and quenching treatment hardness and cold work incidental to machining or straightening shall not exceed the limits imposed by the appropriate product specification”. The product specification ASTM A479 does not state a maximum hardness limit for UNS S31603. Cold drawing is permitted for straightening purposes under Supplementary Requirement S5 related to SCC resistance of ASTM A479 which ties in with ‘cold work incidental to straightening’ stated in your NACE MR0175 / I15156-3 2015 standard. However due to their being no hardness limit and also no clear limit on the amount of cold work other than for straightening purposes in this ASTM A479 product specification what is your definition of these limits Do we assume a maximum limit of 22 HRC stated under note ‘a’ in table A.2 Also can a limit be placed on the material’s maximum yield and tensile strength that correlates with the amount of permitted cold work that does not compromise the material’s resistance to SCC https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 129:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ANSWER: Q1: Referring to 15156-3 Table A.2 what is the definition of cold work limits for UNS S31603 with respect to straightening in accordance with ASTM A479 Supplement S5 A1: The cold work limit is not defined in Table A.2 only that the material shall be free of cold work intended to enhance mechanical properties. Q2: With the straightening cold work can we assume that the hardness limit of 22 HRC applies A2: Correct the maximum hardness is 22 HRC. Q3: Can a limit on the material’s maximum yield and tensile strength be placed on the material that corresponds to the maximum permitted cold work A.3: The maximum yield and tensile is not defined. During our discussions on the ballot regarding cold work of UNS S31603 and Table A.2 there was a lot of agreement that the maximum “specified minimum yield strength SMYS” needed to correspond to that of the annealed without cold work condition. However there was not sufficient consensus to define what this maximum SMYS should be. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-04 This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 130:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 153. What are the NACE MR0175 requirements for ASTM A216 Grade WCB valves ASME IX P1 material is listed as acceptable in NACE MR0175 but this does not mean that the general requirements do not apply i.e. hardness heat treatment HIC resistance etc. At Oil Gas Corrosion we can help you confirm material compliance to ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Question: I am writing about one question which is not clear for me after reading “NACE MR0175/ISO 15156” My question is: whether this standard is applicable for valve casting material as ASTM 216WCB or not I have read many time this standard but just mentioned for pipe and fitting products . Regarding attached file I have confused should I do HIC and SSC test on the valve casting components or not Could you please deal with the question and let me know how I can find clear idea. Reference to Valve Magazine 18 January 2011 Materials QA Answer 1: If NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 is a requirement for the product then NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Section 1 with Table 1 defines applicability. Valve materials are not listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Table 1 as a permitted exclusion. Therefore valves must comply with the standard. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 131:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question 2: If yes is ASTM A216 Grade WCB compliant ASTM A216 grade WCB is a low carbon steel with 250 MPa 36 ksi minimum yield strength in one of the following conditions: annealed normalized or normalized tempered. Answer 2: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A Section A.2 lists the general compliance requirements for carbon and low alloy steels including castings. One of the requirements of A.2.1.2 is that the hardness must be 22 HRC maximum. ASTM A216 Grade WCB could be compliant with the addition of the maximum hardness limit. Question 3: Am I required to perform HIC and SSCs test on the valve casting components Answer 3: If all the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A Section A.2 are met then Section A.2.1.1 states “Carbon and low-alloy steels products and components that comply with A.2 are with stated exceptions qualified in accordance with this part of ISO 15156 without further SSC testing. Nevertheless any SSC testing that forms part of a materials manufacturing specification shall be carried out successfully and the results reported.” NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 8 defines the need to perform HIC testing. As noted in Clause 8 castings with less than 0.025 Sulfur mass fraction are not normally considered sensitive to HIC or SOHIC Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-05 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 132:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 154. In Table A.3 is there a maximum hardness value for AISI 4130 Q T with 140 ksi yield for temperatures 80°C Question: In Table A.3 is there a maximum hardness value for AISI 4130 Q T with 140 ksi yield for temperatures 80°C Answer: 4130 is not listed in Table A.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-06 This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 A.2.2.3.3 T able A.2 and Table A.3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 133:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 155. What are the NACE MR0175 hardness requirements for a butt-weld with inner CRA cladding It is understood that the section A.2.1.5 and Table A.1 of NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-2 and section A.13.1 of NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-3 for cladding lining and overlay deal with the cladding lining and overlay of the overall internal surface of a carbon steel component and in contact with the fluid. In the case of CRA girth welding of a clad pipe it is understood that the above mentioned sections are not applicable to the carbon steel HAZ of the CRA girth weld except the portion which crosses the carbon steel HAZ of the overlay. See below figure. Could you confirm that our understanding is correct https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 134:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ANSWER: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Section A.2.1.5 does permit the waiver of the maximum hardness requirements in accordance with NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-3 Section A.13.1. The NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-3 Section A.13.1 define the conditions and requirements for waiving the maximum hardness. Specifically the user must demonstrate and document the likely long term integrity of the cladding or overlay. The long term integrity can be affected by 1 application of heat or stress-relief treatments 2 environmental cracking under intended service conditions 3 other corrosion mechanisms 4 mechanical damage and 5 dilution of the overlay. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 A.2.1.4 and A.2.1.5 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-07 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 135:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 156. Which NACE MR0175 applies to 718 regardless of heat treated condition If a Nickel alloy does not have any age / precipitation-hardening heat treatment applied to it does this not make it a solid-solution type alloy and therefore should be covered by Tables A.12 to A.16 of the NACE standard instead Regarding precipitation hardened Nickel based alloys Tables A.31 to A.34 all have the heading ‘Environmental and materials limits for precipitation- hardened nickel based alloys used…….’. The heading gives the impression that all materials listed in the Tables A31. to A.34 are precipitation hardened type Nickel based alloys only however in the notes sections in the Tables the alloys are allowed to be in other conditions i.e. in Table A.32 wrought UNS N07718 is allowed to be in four different heat treated conditions including a solution-annealed condition and a hot-worked condition both of these conditions do not involve any age / precipitation-hardening. If a Nickel alloy does not have any age / precipitation-hardening heat treatment applied to it does this not make it a solid-solution type alloy and therefore should be covered by Tables A.12 to A.16 of the NACE standard instead https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 136:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: If UNS N07718 precipitation hardened nickel base alloy in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 is in the solution annealed condition is this Table A.32 still applicable or should it be considered a solid solution nickel base alloy and Table A.14 would be applicable Answer: UNS N07718 is considered to be a precipitation hardened nickel base alloy regardless of the heat treated condition Table A.32 is the applicable Table as opposed to Table A.14. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.9 T able A.31 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 137:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 157. Is there anything preventing someone from averaging HRV values right now QUESTION: Section 7.3.2 of Part 2 of NACE MR0175/ ISO 15156 states that when hardness of parent metals are taken after welding using the Rockwell C method as long as no individual reading is greater than 2HRC above the specified value you are allowed to average several readings in close proximity. For example if you punch a 23HRC where 22 HRC max is the requirement you can take 3 or 4 reading e.g. 21 2122 22 and if the average does not exceed 22 the test is valid and the qualification or procedure is successful. When using the HV5 HV10 or HRC 15N scales the document is silent on averaging. If you look on the ASTM E140 conversion chart 22 HRC is approximately 250 HV and 20 HRC is approximately 234HV. In this hardness range there is basically a 16HV difference that equates to 2 HRC—or 8 HV points for every 1HRC point. It does not seem to make any technical sense to reject a weld procedure for being off say 1 2 or 3 HRV points which would amount to less than 0.5 HRC points. It seems to that averaging a few points for example if you punched a 252HV in one area would be the logical and prudent thing to do. The basic question would be is there anything preventing someone from averaging HRV values right now If there is does the group feel that a formal ballot would be warranted https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 138:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ANSWER: The referee hardness tests in for proving out isolated hard readings is not currently addressed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. A successful ballot would be required to add this into the standard. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 7.3.2 and 7.3.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-10 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 139:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 158. NACE MR0175 and the evaluation and acceptance criteria for the Four Point Bend FPB test QUESTION: This inquiry for help with interpretation concerns the clause NACE MR0175/ ISO 15156-2 B.4.2.3 Evaluation and acceptance criteria for FPB test specimens. 1 It is written “Damage developed on the tensile side of a specimen in the form of blisters less than 1 mm below the surface or on the compression side regardless of the depth of the blister may be disregarded for the assessment of SOHIC/SZC but shall be reported” Question : Does this means that Damage developed on the tensile side of a specimen in the form of blisters MORE than 1 mm below the surface has to be considered as not allowed/not acceptable or should only be reported as “blisters more than 1 mm below the surface” See below Example 1: No blisters deeper than 1mm in the tension side are allowed 2 It is written “No ladder-like HIC features nor cracks exceeding a length of 0.5 mm in the through thickness direction are allowed” Question: Are cracks developed inside an area affected by a blister disregarded for the assessment cf. example 2 picture In other words: Shall the damage in example 2 be reported as: A a blister B a crack C a blister and a crack https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 140:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ANSWER: Question 1: “Damage developed on the tensile side of a specimen in the form of blisters less than 1 mm below the surface or on the compression side regardless of the depth of the blister may be disregarded for the assessment of SOHIC/SZC but shall be reported”. Does this means that Damage developed on the tensile side of a specimen in the form of blisters MORE than 1 mm below the surface has to be considered as not allowed/not acceptable or should only be reported as “blisters more than 1 mm below the surface” Answer 1: Blisters greater than 1 mm below the surface are not acceptable. Question 2: “no ladder-like HIC features or cracks exceeding a length of 0.5 mm in the through thickness direction is allowed”. Are cracks developed inside an area affected by a blister disregarded for the assessment cf. example 2 picture In other words: Shall the damage in example 2 be reported as: A a blister B a crack C a blister and a crack Answer 2: if both cracks and blisters are present as defined Clause B.4.2.3 they both need to be reported. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 B.4.2.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 141:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 159. In NACE MR0175 is UNS S41425 sulfur resistant in Table A.18 QUESTION: Material grade S41425 is listed as not being sulfur resistant in Table A.18 — “Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components” ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2015E. For the column ‘Sulfur resistant’ it says ‘No’. I wanted to confirm that was indeed a correct designation and not an error. MP INQUIRY 2016-13 ANSWER: No and it is not a misprint. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 T able A.18 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2016-13 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 142:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 160. What is the NACE MR0175 hardness requirement for Inconel 625 UNS N06625 Question: What is the NACE MR0175 hardness requirement for Inconel 625 UNS N06625 Answer: NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 has no hardness restrictions for solid solution nickel based alloys including Inconel 625 UNS N06625. Some users may require hardness to comply with 35HRC this requirement was listed in NACE MR0175 prior to 2003. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 143:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 has no hardness restrictions for solid solution nickel based alloys including Inconel 625 UNS N06625. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 144:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang QA - Completed https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

slide 145:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

authorStream Live Help