NACE MR0175 CRA Exam- Reading 2b Q&A

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NACE MR0175 Study Note CS/CRA

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE MR0175- CRA Written Exam My Reading 2b QA 51100 2017 Nov 24 th

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

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闭门练功 Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭 门 练 功

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NACE MR0175 Written Exam Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-1:2009E 9 Report of the method of selection or qualification Materials selected or qualified in accordance with this part of ISO 15156 shall have the method of selection documented by reporting item a from the following list together with one other item b c or d: https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 51. Is there a NACE office available in Italy or in other European countries Question: Is a NACE office available in Italy or in other European countries All inquiries should be transmitted to the ISO Maintenance NACE Headquarters in Houston Texas Maintenance.Panelnace.org. The Maintenance Panel has an international membership. Details of its current membership can be obtained from the above address. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-26 Q5 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 52. Is ISO 9001/9002 required to supply NACE MR0175 equipment and material Question: Some buyers in the U.S. are requesting equipment to ISO 15156 and then saying that the supplying company has to be ISO registered i.e. has ISO 9002 in place quality standard. As far as I know these are unrelated issues a supplier to ISO 15156 does not have to be ISO 9002 registered. Can the Maintenance Panel confirm that ISO 9002 is not a requirement for supply to ISO 15156 Is there an equivalent U.S. standard to ISO 9002 Answer: ISO 9002 is NOT referenced in any of the ISO 15156 parts. That means ISO 9002 is not necessary to comply with ISO 15156. If ISO 9002 is part of a contract between two business parties ISO 9002 becomes a requirement based on the contract not based on ISO 15156. In addition ISO 9002 has been replaced by ISO 9001: Quality management systems-- Requirements. There are no widely accepted American equivalents to either ISO 9002 or ISO 9001. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-25 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 53. Crude oil storage does it have to comply with NACE MR0175 Question: Crude oil storage and handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 0.45 MPa. My understanding of the above paragraph is that it includes only dead oils with no gas in equilibrium. If any gas is in equilibrium with a crude operating less than 0.45 MPa which contains H2S more than 0.3kPa in the gas phase the whole system is considered as sour. I need your advice for my understanding if correct or not Answer: Crude oil storage and handling facilities means that it is dead oil and H2S/CO2 have been removed. The very low residual amount is considered negligible. This is the reason why these facilities are permitted exclusions from the standard. However it is up to the user to check that these statements are true for the considered facilities. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-14 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Remarks: Crude oil storage and handling facilities means that it is dead oil and H 2 S/CO 2 have been removed. The very low residual amount is considered negligible. The P H2S is thus believe to be 0.3kPa / 0.05 psi https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Crude Oil Storage- Exclusion item https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Crude Oil Storage Handling- Exclusion item https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Crude Oil Storage Handling- Exclusion item https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-3:2015E Table 1 — List of equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ ISO 15156 is applicable to materials used for the following equipment Permitted exclusions Flow-lines gathering lines field facilities and field processing plants Crude oil storage and handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 045 MPa 65 psi Water-handling equipment Water-handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 045 MPa 65 psi Water injection and water disposal equipment

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Permitted exclusions Crude oil storage and handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 045 MPa 65 psi https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Permitted exclusions Crude oil storage and handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 045 MPa 65 psi

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Permitted exclusions Crude oil storage and handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 045 MPa 65 psi

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156 is applicable to materials used for the following equipment –  Flow-lines gathering lines field facilities and field processing plants  Transportation pipelines for liquids gases and multi-phase fluids https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ ISO 15156 is applicable to materials used for the following equipment –  Flow-lines gathering lines field facilities and field processing plants  Transportation pipelines for liquids gases and multi-phase fluids

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 54. Who is responsible for certification of materials and equipment to NACE MR0175 The manufacturer or the user Question: Is it the intent of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 that material manufacturers state on the Material Test Certificates that material conforms to the NACE standard even though no operating criteria are known Answer: Certification requirements are outside the scope of the standard and there are no stipulations concerning certification in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. The compliance with the NACE/ISO standard of a material for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas can only be assessed for the material in its final product form and this may differ metallurgically from that of the material supplied by the materials manufacturer. In addition compliance with the standard also depends on the cracking mechanisms that have to be considered. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 9 Annex E Informative and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 7.2 Annex C Informative make some suggestions on how materials manufacturers and other suppliers might mark their materials to indicate the evaluation testing that they have carried out. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 / Certification and Compliance Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-13. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Certification requirements are outside the scope of the standard and there are no stipulations concerning certification in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. The compliance with the NACE/ISO standard of a material for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas can only be assessed for the material in its final product form and this may differ metallurgically from that of the material supplied by the materials manufacturer. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang In addition compliance with the standard also depends on the cracking mechanisms that have to be considered. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Discussion on: The compliance with the NACE/ISO standard of a material for use in H2S-containing environments in oil and gas can only be assessed for the material in its final product form and this may differ metallurgically from that of the material supplied by the materials manufacturer. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ■ ωσμ∙Ωπ∆ ∇ º≠δ≤ηθφФρ|β≠Ɛ∠ ʋ λ α ρτ√ ≠≥ѵФε ≠≥ѵФ: https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Discussion on: In addition compliance with the standard also depends on the cracking mechanisms that have to be considered.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 55. What is NACE MR0175 definition of a Corrosion Resistant Alloy CRA Question: I need your help with the definition of CRAs in Part 3 of MR0175/ISO 15156. The "corrosion-resistant alloys" is very general and does not specify whether or not the definition includes the Fe-based alloys or not. More than that the term CRA is used together with "other alloys" making it even more confusing. Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Paragraph 3.6 contains a definition of "corrosion-resistant alloy" CRA. It reads: "alloy intended to be resistant to general and localized corrosion of oilfield environments that are corrosive to carbon steel." This is taken from EFC 17. "Other Alloys" are those not covered by the definitions of carbon steel or CRA. For example copper is not considered resistant to general corrosion but is considered in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 56. Are metal rupture discs outside of the scope of NACE MR0175-ISO 15156 Question: Using NACE MR0175-ISO 15156-1 Clause 5 Paragraph 9 and NACE Interpretation MP INQUIRY 2009-05 Part 1 as references. Based on the fact that most metal rupture discs are plastically deformed during manufacturing and all metal rupture discs plastically deform when they burst are metal rupture discs outside of the scope of NACE MR0175-ISO 15156 Answer: No. Permitted exclusions are listed in ISO 15156-1 Table 1. When ISO 15156 is specified components including rupture discs must comply with the materials and conditions listed in the standard or qualified in accordance with Annex B. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 5 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 57. NACE MR0175 and elastic or plastic design criteria Question: Unfortunately answer 2011-08 left my organization at a loss. This answer does not address the fact that NACE MR0175-ISO 15156-1 Clause 5 states: This part of ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 applies to the qualification and selection of materials for equipment designed and constructed using conventional elastic design criteria. For designs using plastic criteria e.g. stain-based and limit-states designs use of this part of ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 might not be appropriate and the equipment/material supplier in conjunction with the equipment user shall assess the need for other requirements. This response does not address the issue that rupture discs plastically deform which is at the heart of and the basis of the previous inquiry. Metal rupture discs are made 8 to order product that plastically deform as part of the manufacturing process and will plastically deform when they burst fail when exposed to an overpressure process condition. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: "The Maintenance Panel for NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 has reviewed your inquiry submitted May 4 2012. You asked for further clarification of the answers to MP Inquiries 2009-05 and 2011-08. Here is the Maintenance Panel’s response: • The answer previously given has been confirmed to be correct by the Maintenance Panel MP. • The MP also confirms there is no conflict with the reply given for Inquiry 2009-05. • Since the rupture disk is not a “Table A.1 exclusion” it must either meet the material requirements in Annex A or be approved by the end user based on laboratory testing or field history. Confirming compliance with the material requirements in Annex A may be difficult for a rupture disk. However it may be possible to demonstrate that the same raw material sheet with plastic deformation equivalent to worst-case locations on the rupture disk have metallurgical properties well within the material requirements in the standard. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Additional comments from other MP members: 1. On the issue of plastic deformation during manufacturing: -Whether the material is plastically deformed in fabrication is not the issue here. -Plastic deformation during manufacturing is irrelevant to clause 5 paragraph 9. 2. On the issue of deformation during rupture: -Plastic deformation occurs when they burst but then they’re intended to burst. -The rupture disk functions within its elastic limit during the pressure-containing bulk of its service life. They are not designed to operate after additional in situ deformation i.e. no strain-based design. Plastic deformation on failure is incidental to the function. -The purpose of the wording in Part 1 Section 5 is to cover design criteria where the material is expected to function beyond the elastic limit in service without failing strain-based designs for pipelines being a prime example. Bursting disks do not fall into this category either being plastically deformed cold worked prior to service or suffering from plastic deformation incidental to failure albeit failure is part of the function of the bursting disc in cases of over pressurization in service." This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 5 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 58. How can used and old equipment be certified to NACE MR0175 Question: My customer has some swab tanks that were manufactured in 1953 they are made of rolled 1/2- inch plate A283C the tank is 84 in. in diameter and is rated for 100-psi service. The question is given the following conditions does this tank meet NACE MR0175 According to Section A2.1.6 the requirement that all rolled or deformed material must be stress relieved and have a hardness of 22 HRC max. The problem is we cannot or have no documentation as it relates to the heat treat of the plate post welding. yet when tested the material meets the A283C requirements and the hardness are in the 120-127 HB. Ultrasonic testing as part of a corrosion survey on the tank was performed and all was in order. Engineering approval was granted on the status of the vessel as a pressure vessel under the ABSA Alberta Boilers Safety Association. This tank is 52 years old is in excellent condition and the customer wants to have more current documents on the tank as it relates to its status as an ABSA pressure vessel and its NACE MR0175. With all this information can a determination be made that this material in its current state is suitable as a material that qualifies as a NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-compliant material Using the long life performance and the mechanical data gathered can this determination be made If so can these criteria be used to establish a basis for performing future work on this exact style of tank Answer: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot advise on the suitability of this tank for use in sour service. It is the responsibility of the equipment user to assess the suitability of the material and to ensure compliance with NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot advise on the suitability of this tank for use in sour service. It is the responsibility of the equipment user to assess the suitability of the material and to ensure compliance with NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang  MP do not advice on the suitability of equipment  The User responsibility to assess the suitability of equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Discussion on: How the user assess the suitability of equipment in the intended environment What are the basis of acceptance https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 59. What are the NACE MR0175 requirements for C95800 C95400 C95500 and C63200 Question: We are using the following materials for manufacturing of valve components. In reference to the clause A.12.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2003 no any special requirements are specified to these materials for use in SOUR environment. We wish to know what shall be the chemical physical hardness properties and heat treatment requirements for using these materials in SOUR service environment. Valve Components: Body – ASTM B148 UNS C95800 C95400 C95500. Stem – ASTM B150 UNS C63200. Ball – ASTM B148 UNS C95800. Answer: For these materials there are no 15156 restrictions on chemistry hardness or heat treatment. However note that these materials can undergo severe weight loss corrosion. They may also be susceptible hydrogen stress cracking when galvanically coupled to steel. It is up to the user to decide if qualification of these materials is necessary in the applicable sour service environment. § 8 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 1 indicates how these materials can be qualified. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 8 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ASTM B150 / B150M - 122017 Standard Specification for Aluminum Bronze Rod Bar and Shapes A.12.1 Copper-based alloys Copper-based alloys have been used without restriction on temperature pH2S Cl− or in situ pH in production environments. NOTE 1 Copper-based alloys can undergo accelerated mass loss corrosion weight loss corrosion in sour oil field environments particularly if oxygen is present. NOTE 2 Some copper-based alloys have shown sensitivity to GHSC. A.12.2 Aluminium-based alloys These materials have been used without restriction on temperature pH2S Cl− or in situ pH in production environments. The user should be aware that mass loss corrosion weight loss corrosion of aluminium-based alloys is strongly dependent on environmental pH. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang For Copper and Aluminum materials “ have been used without restriction ” https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang For Copper and Aluminum materials “ It is up to the user to decide if qualification of these materials is necessary ” https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 60. Successful field service No documentation What does NACE MR0175 require Question: When materials in an existing field are replaced what criteria should be used Paragraph 8.2 of ISO 15156-1 provides some criteria for qualification but it is not clear what approach should be used for materials that have been in use with no problems but documentation does not exist. Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Paragraphs 6.2 8.1 8.2 and 9.0 provide a complete description of the documentation required for two years’ successful field service. Documentation has always been required. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 8.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-41 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-1:2009E 8 Qualification of materials for H2S service 8.1 Material description and documentation The material being qualified shall be described and documented such that those of its properties likely to affect performance in H2S-containing media are defined. The tolerances or ranges of properties that can occur within the material shall be described and documented. Metallurgical properties known to affect performance in H2S-containing environments include chemical composition method of manufacture product form strength hardness amount of cold work heat-treatment condition and microstructure. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 8.2 Qualification based upon field experience A material may be qualified by documented field experience. The material description shall meet the requirements of 8.1. The description of the service conditions in which the experience has been gained shall meet the relevant requirements of 6.1. The duration of the documented field experience shall be at least two years and should preferably involve a full examination of the equipment following field use. The severity of intended service conditions shall not exceed that of the field experience for which documented records are available. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6 Evaluation and definition of service conditions to enable material selection 6.1 Before selecting or qualifying materials using Parts 2 and 3 of ISO 15156 the user of the equipment shall define evaluate and document the service conditions to which materials can be exposed for each application. The defined conditions shall include both intended exposures and unintended exposures that can result from the failure of primary containment or protection methods. Particular attention shall be paid to the quantification of those factors known to affect the susceptibility of materials to cracking caused by H2S. Factors other than material properties known to affect the susceptibility of metallic materials to cracking in H2S service include H2S partial pressure in situ pH the concentration of dissolved chloride or other halide the presence of elemental sulfur or other oxidant temperature galvanic effects mechanical stress and time of exposure to contact with a liquid water phase. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 61. What does NACE MR0175 mean by "Qualification based upon field experience" Question: Q1: I need some clarifications on the clause 8.2 of the MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Qualification based upon field experience. “A material may be qualified by documented field experience”--”the duration of the documented field experience shall be at least two years. . . “ What kind of documentation is expected We need to know exactly what to ask from the end user. Is a letter describing the conditions for which the material qualified for the past two years enough Answer: A1: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Paragraphs 6.2 8.1 8.2 and 9.0 provide a complete description of the documentation required for two years’ successful field service. Documentation has always been required. ISO 15156-1:2009E 6 Evaluation and definition of service conditions to enable material selection 6.2 The documented service conditions shall be used for one or more of the following purposes: 8.1 Material description and documentation 8.2 Qualification based upon field experience 9 Report of the method of selection or qualification https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Normal Routes :Qualification based upon laboratory testing https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Qualification based upon field experience Paragraphs 6.2 8.1 8.2 and 9.0 provide a complete description of the documentation required ISO 15156-1:2009E  6 Evaluation and definition of service conditions to enable material selection  6.2 The documented service conditions shall be used for one or more of the following purposes:  8.1 Material description and documentation  8.2 Qualification based upon field experience  9 Report of the method of selection or qualification

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Normal Routes :Qualification based upon laboratory testing https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Paragraphs 6.2 8.1 8.3 and 9.0 provide a complete description of the documentation required ISO 15156-1:2009E  6 Evaluation and definition of service conditions to enable material selection  6.2 The documented service conditions shall be used for one or more of the following purposes:  8.1 Material description and documentation  8.3 Qualification based upon laboratory testing  9 Report of the method of selection or qualification

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Normal Routes :Selection of materials resistant to SSC/SCC in the presence of sulfides from existing lists and tables https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Paragraphs 6.2 7 and 9.0 provide a complete description of the documentation required ISO 15156-1:2009E  6 Evaluation and definition of service conditions to enable material selection  6.2 The documented service conditions shall be used for one or more of the following purposes:  7 Selection of materials resistant to SSC/SCC in the presence of sulfides from existing lists and tables  9 Report of the method of selection or qualification

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q2: What do we the equipment manufacturer do with this documentation field service qualification A2:The equipment user is responsible for the preparation of the required documentation see NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 9 Paragraph 1 to support the use of a material in a plant on the basis of field experience. It would also be in the equipment user’s interest to keep copies of this documentation in their records in case they are challenged to prove they are responsible operators. The equipment manufacturer can choose to retain a copy for future reference. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q3: Does it have to be filed with NACE If yes is this our responsibility A3: It is not the responsibility of the equipment manufacturer to file information with NACE unless they choose to. This may be the case because the equipment manufacturer has made the effort to compile a non-proprietary database that they believe supports the use of alloys for their equipment under the conditions documented by the process in Question One. Q4: If filing field service documentation with NACE is not required do we have to verify the claims or can we just provide the materials as requested by the end user A4: The manufacturer can provide this information to a user but it is the user’s responsibility to determine the operating conditions and select the appropriate materials. It is the manufacturer’s responsibility to meet the metallurgical requirements of the appropriate alloys in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 8.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-05 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Qualification based upon field experience The duration of the documented field experience shall be at least two years https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Qualification based upon field experience The duration of the documented field experience shall be at least two years https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Qualification based upon field experience The duration of the documented field experience shall be at least two years https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ……….. It would also be in the equipment user’s interest to keep copies of this documentation in their records in case they are challenged to prove they are responsible operators. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 62. What happens to equipment and material certified to old NACE MR0175 versions Question: How should existing equipment affected by changing materials requirements in later editions of the standard be handled Answer: By convention a new version of the standard is not applied retrospectively to equipment built to the previous version of the standard valid at the time of equipment construction. New requirements in the latest version may be applied retrospectively by an equipment user or mandated for retrospective application by a regulatory authority. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 8.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-10 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Retrospectively retrospective said of data already collected or of events that have already occurred. Hence a retrospective study is a study of past events in contradistinction to a prospective study. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/retrospectively https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/retrospectively Compliances

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang By convention a new version of the standard is not applied retrospectively to equipment built to the previous version https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang In “Simple English”:  New certified equipment complied with the prevision revision standard if required  Old certified equipment complied only with the standard during time of certification and before that https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang In “Simple English”:  New certified equipment complied with the prevision revision standard if required  Old certified equipment complied only with the standard during time of certification and before that https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang In “Simple English”:  New certified equipment complied with the prevision revision standard if required  Old certified equipment complied only with the standard during time of certification and before that https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 63. Equipment of a SAGD plant is it covered by NACE MR0175 Question: Regarding Table 1 in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 is it defined what field facilities and field processing plants include Would this include a SAGD plant Also when using below 65 psi for exclusion does this stand true for all: liquid vapour or mixed streams also in Table 1 Answer: SAGD plant is not specifically included in Table 1 because it is not a “conventional” technique of oil production. However it is up to the user to determine if some parts of a SAGD process may fit with the listed permitted exclusions. Please refer to answer to Inquiry 2009-14 for the second part of the question. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang SAGD- Steam-assisted gravity drainage https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang SAGD- Steam-assisted gravity drainage https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang SAGD- Steam-assisted gravity drainage https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang SAGD- Steam-assisted gravity drainage Steam Generator and Injection Trees https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 64. NACE MR0175 and the definition of pressure-containing parts “parts whose failure would result in a release“ Question: Definition of pressure-containing parts: “Those parts whose failure to function as intended would result in a release of retained fluid to the atmosphere. Examples are valve bodies bonnets and stems.” Are stems always defined as pressure-containing parts regardless of features that by design keep the stem intact Example 1: Internal entry stems for ball valves that have a shoulder that rests against the body around the stem bore. Example 2: Shafts for butterfly valves that have a retaining ring holding the shaft inside the valve. Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 cannot interpret design issues. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 3.14 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-12 Q2. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The original inquiry to the NACE MR0175 Maintenance Panel is below Question: Definition of pressure-containing parts: “Those parts whose failure to function as intended would result in a release of retained fluid to the atmosphere. Examples are valve bodies bonnets and stems.” Are stems always defined as pressure-containing parts regardless of features that by design keep the stem intact Example 1: Internal entry stems for ball valves that have a shoulder that rests against the body around the stem bore. Example 2: Shafts for butterfly valves that have a retaining ring holding the shaft inside the valve. Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 cannot interpret design issues. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 3.14 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-12 Q2. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 65. Is HIC Resistance "included" when specifying NACE MR0175 Question: Does requiring/specifying steel compliance to ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 in a purchase order include resistance to HIC as well as other forms of sulfide cracking or must HIC resistance be specifically required separately in the purchase order Answer: ISO 15156 / NACE MR0175 covers all cracking mechanisms caused by H2S to be addressed for materials exposed in production environments. This includes HIC/SWC as stated in the scope for Part 2. Section 8 in ISO 15156 / NACE MR0175 Part 2 describes how carbon and low alloy steels shall be evaluated for their resistance to HIC/SWC. Test procedures and acceptance criteria to evaluate the resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels to HIC/SWC are described in B.5. As only flat-rolled carbon steel products are susceptible to HIC/SWC section 5.2 requires that “requirements for HIC resistance” are provided in the purchasing specification. Note that a list of information must be included in the purchase order note also the use of the word “shall” in the section that includes “requirements for HIC resistance”. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 5.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-02 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 8 Evaluation of carbon and low alloy steels for their resistance to HIC/SWC The equipment user shall consider HIC/SWC as defined in ISO 15156-1 when evaluating flat-rolled carbon steel products for sour service environments containing even trace amounts of H2S and shall consider HIC/SWC testing of these products. Annex B provides guidance on test methods and acceptance criteria to evaluate resistance to HIC/SWC. The probability of HIC/SWC is influenced by steel chemistry and manufacturing route. The level of sulfur in the steel is of particular importance typical maximum acceptable levels for flat-rolled and seamless products are 0003 mass fraction and 001 mass fraction respectively. Comparison purposes on seamless Conventional forgings with sulfur levels less than 0025 mass fraction and castings are not normally considered sensitive to HIC or SOHIC. NOTE 1 HIC/SWC leading to loss of containment has occurred only rarely in seamless pipe and other products that are not flat-rolled. Furthermore seamless pipe manufactured using modern technology is much less sensitive to HIC/SWC than older products. Hence there can be benefits in evaluating seamless pipe for HIC/SWC resistance for applications where the potential consequences of failure make this justifiable. NOTE 2 The presence of rust sulfur or oxygen particularly together with chloride in the service environment is thought to increase the probability of damage. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The severity to HIC/SWC of Flat- Rolled products w.r.t others was highlighted The level of sulfur in the steel is of particular importance typical maximum acceptable levels for flat- rolled and seamless products are 0003 mass fraction and 001 mass fraction respectively. Conventional forgings with sulfur levels less than 0025 mass fraction and castings are not normally considered sensitive to HIC or SOHIC. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The severity to HIC/SWC of Flat- Rolled products w.r.t others was highlighted All product forms are sensitive to HIC/SWC damage in one way or others https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 66. In NACE MR0175 Is a welding consumable with a nickel content of 1.03 acceptable Question: Is a welding consumable with a nickel content of 1.03 acceptable or is 1.00 the maximum allowed Answer: For carbon and low-alloy steels 1 nickel has been set to be the maximum to avoid SSC. However a value above 1 could be used if it is qualified as stated in A.2.1.4. It is not the role of the Maintenance Panel to give an opinion on a specific metallurgical issue. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 5.3.1.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-20 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-2:2015E A.2.1.4 Welding Welding and weld-hardness determinations shall be performed in accordance with 7.3.3. Acceptable maximum hardness values for carbon steel carbon manganese steel and low alloy steel welds are given in Table A.1. ……… Welding consumables and procedures that produce a deposit containing more than 1 mass fraction nickel are acceptable after successful weld SSC qualification by testing in accordance with Annex B. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 67. Difference between the NACE MR0175 requirements of SSC and HIC/SWC Question: There is ambiguity between two passages they contradict paragraph 7.2.1.2 “SSC regions of environmental severity” of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2:2009 E to 17 Paragraph 8 “Evaluation of carbon and low alloy steels for their resistance to HIC/SWC” of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 – 2:2009 E The paragraph 7.2.1.2 for Region 0 – For pH2S 0.3 kPa 0.05 psi “ Normally no precautions are required for the selection of steels for use under these conditions whereas paragraph 8 says even trace amounts of H2S and shall consider HIC/SWC testing of these products” In addition the Sulfur restriction in the chemistry of.003 maximum. Answer: “Your quoted passages of the standard are not contradictory. The standard provides different qualification requirements for different materials and different potential cracking modes. Clause 7 is for “- - steels with resistance to SSC SOHIC and SZC”. 7.2.1.2 7.2.1.3 are only applicable to SSC. Clause 8 is for “Evaluation of carbon and low alloy steels for their resistance to HIC/SWC”. For carbon steel products made from rolled plate in addition to consideration of SSC resistance HIC/SWC shall be considered clause 8 and SOHIC and SCZ should be considered clause 7.2.2.” This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.2.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2012-09 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 68. In NACE MR0175 what does the uncertainty below 0.3 kPa mean Question: There is the sentence in the note 1 of Figure 1 in ISO 15156-2: "The discontinuities in the figure below 0.3 kPa 0.05 psi and above 1 MPa 150 psi partial pressure H2S reflect uncertainty with respect to the measurement of H2S partial pressure low H2S and steels performance outside these limits both lower and higher H2S." I understand the above sentence and if I will use the carbon steel and low-alloy steel in the sour service above 1 MPa 150 psi of partial pressure of H2S what can I do Should I require a special laboratory test imitating the H2S partial pressure and pH in the service for SSC of the carbon steel and low-alloy steel Which solution can I use in the special laboratory test NACE TM0177 A solution or the imitating solution in the service Keywords:  uncertainty with respect to the measurement of H2S partial pressure  uncertainty steels performance outside these limits https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: The following response must be seen in the context of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7. 1. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Fig. 1 is a schematic definition of Regions of environmental severity with respect to SSC of carbon and low alloy steels. As mentioned in Paragraph 7.2.1.4 qualification for the use of a material not listed in Annex A for use in one or more of the Regions of Fig. 1 is always dependent on reported field experience or laboratory testing. There is little documented evidence that describes the SSC resistance of carbon and low alloy steels in H2S-containing environments outside the H2S limits of Fig. 1. The Note quoted reflects this. 2. The equipment user must decide whether the listing of a steel in Annex A serves as an adequate guide for its behavior in H2S-containing field environments that might be more severe with respect to SSC than those represented by the SSC testing methods normally used see Annex B.1a. For qualification for a specific application all the test conditions must be at least as severe with respect to the potential mode of failure as those expected to occur in field service. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.2.1.2 Fig 1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-17 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 69. Does NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 require production casing to be sour service compliant Question: Does NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 require production casing to be sour service compliant if the containment string of tubing is a sour service grade and the bottom hole temperature below the packer satisfies the casing material operating temperature For example--a sour gas well with a H2S partial pressure of 0.10 psi 0.007 bar P-110 casing L-80 tubing and a bottom hole temperature of 300 F 150 C. Supporting Information: Related information can be found in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Table 1 page 2. Production casing is not excluded from meeting the requirements of ISO 15156. AND ISO 15156-1/NACE MR0175 Section 6 which is reproduced in part below with the relevant parts underlined. 6. Evaluation and definition of service conditions to enable material selection 6.1 Before selecting or qualifying materials using other parts of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 the user of the equipment shall define evaluate and document the service conditions to which materials may be exposed for each application. The defined conditions shall include both intended exposures and unintended exposures which may result from the failure of primary containment or protection methods. Particular attention shall be paid to the quantification of those factors known to affect the susceptibility of materials to cracking caused by H2S. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: 1. As stated in your inquiry the secondary barrier must also be sour service and follow the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. 2. A casing grade can be used under severity 3 of the diagram Fig. 1 of § 7.2.1.2. provided its working temperature is always above the minimum temperature given in ISO 15156-2 Table A.3. This can only be true if the material is well defined API grade and its temperature is always above the minimum temperature. According to Table A.3 if P110 is at a temperature ≥80°C 175°F it can be used in Region 3 of the diagram Figure 1 of §7.2 in ISO 15156-2. It is up to the equipment user to establish that all intended and unintended exposure conditions are covered. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.2.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ containment string of tubing

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Downhole tubing material selection for Region 1/2/3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ A.4 SSC-resistant steels for use throughout SSC region 1 A.4.2 Downhole casing tubing and tubular components Casing tubing and tubular components made of Cr-Mo low-alloy steels UNS G41XX0 formerly AISI 41XX and modifications have proven acceptable in the quenched and tempered condition. Typically the actual yield strength of acceptable steels has been no more than 896 MPa 130 ksi an SMYS of approximately 760 MPa 110 ksi and their hardness has been no more than 30 HRC. Other requirements shall be in accordance with the applicable manufacturing specification. A.3 SSC-resistant steels for use throughout SSC region 2 A.3.2 Downhole casing tubing and tubular components Casing tubing and tubular components made of Cr-Mo low-alloy steels UNS G41XX0 formerly AISI 41XX and modifications have proven acceptable in the quenched and tempered condition. Typically the actual yield strength of acceptable steels has been no more than 760 MPa 110 ksi an SMYS of approximately 550 MPa 80 ksi and their hardness has been no more than 27 HRC. Other requirements shall be in accordance with the applicable manufacturing specification. A.2 SSC-resistant carbon and low-alloy steels and the use of cast irons A.2.2.3 Downhole casing tubing and tubular components A.2.2.3.1 ISO and API grades of casing and tubing are acceptable for the temperature ranges given in Table A.3.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.3 — Environmental conditions for which grades of casing and tubing are acceptable https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-2:2015E Table 1 — List of equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 70. Does ISO 15156-2 7.3.2 also apply to low-alloy martensitic steels such as CA6NM Question: Does the MR0175/ISO 15156-2 7.3.2 also apply to low-alloy martensitic steels such as CA6NM which is in fact considered a CRA MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Answer: No it does not. Please see ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 and ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 Table A18. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.3.2 and 7.3.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-18 Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 71. In NACE MR0175 does “Hardness of parent metals” apply to machined forgings just to weldment parent metals Question: Do NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 7.3.2 “Parent metals” and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 “Hardness of parent metals” apply to machined forgings or are they meant to be applied to weldment parent metals only Answer: The requirements listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Section 7.3.2 apply to the parent materials applicable to part 2 carbon and low alloy steels and cast irons. The parent materials include forgings. See also sections A.2.1.2 and A.2.1.3 of Annex A for additional requirements. The requirements listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Section 6.2.1 apply to parent materials applicable to part 2 CRAs and other alloys. The parent materials include forgings This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 6.2.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 72. For Hardness vickers HV What is NACE MR0175 retesting criteria Question: Typically when an indentation fails the micro hardness test several additional indentations are made and measured in the same area as the suspect indentation on the same weld test coupon. The results are then averaged. If the additional indentations average is acceptable the survey is considered acceptable. This is in line with the NACE MR0175 Part 2 Section 7.3 “Hardness” paragraph 7.3.2 “Parent Materials” which allows additional hardness readings in the adjacent areas of a failed hardness reading. Logically the same testing methodology would apply to welds even though it is not specifically stated in the standard and subsequent paragraphs of Part 2. I would like to clarify if the above is acceptable with regards to Vickers HV 10 micro hardness testing / re-testing requirements for welds while conforming to NACE MR0175 Section 7.3.3 Welds. Answer: Maximum acceptable hardness values for carbon steel carbon-manganese steel and low-alloy steel welds are given in Table A.1. No individual readings above these limits are acceptable for welds. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-07 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Parent Material Hardness: Individual HRC readings exceeding the value permitted by this part of ISO 15156 may be considered acceptable if the average of several readings taken within close proximity does not exceed the value permitted by this part of ISO 15156 and no individual reading is greater than 2 HRC above the specified value. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Weld Material Hardness: Maximum acceptable hardness values for carbon steel carbon- manganese steel and low-alloy steel welds are given in Table A.1. No individual readings above these limits are acceptable for welds. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Heat Affected Zone Hardness: HAZ is Parent Material HAZ is Weld https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-2:2015E 7.3 Hardness requirements 7.3.2 Parent metals If hardness measurements on parent metal are specified sufficient hardness tests shall be made to establish the actual hardness of the steel being examined. Individual HRC readings exceeding the value permitted by this part of ISO 15156 may be considered acceptable if the average of several readings taken within close proximity does not exceed the value permitted by this part of ISO 15156 and no individual reading is greater than 2 HRC above the specified value. Equivalent requirements shall apply to other methods of hardness measurement when specified in this part of ISO 15156 or referenced in a manufacturing specification. NOTE The number and location of hardness tests on parent metal are not specified in ISO 15156. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3.3 Welds The qualification of welding procedures for sour service shall include hardness testing in accordance with 7.3.3.2 7.3.3.3 and 7.3.3.4. 7.3.3.4 Hardness acceptance criteria for welds Weld hardness acceptance criteria for steels selected using option 1 see 7.1 shall be as specified in A.2.1.4. Alternative weld hardness acceptance criteria may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B. Weld-hardness acceptance criteria for steels qualified and/or selected using option 2 see 7.2 may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B. A.2.1.4 Welding Welding and weld-hardness determinations shall be performed in accordance with 7.3.3. Acceptable maximum hardness values for carbon steel carbon manganese steel and low alloy steel welds are given in Table A.1. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 73. Seal welding of vent holes on saddle plates welded to pipe do they need to comply with NACE MR0175 Question: Seal welding of vent holes on saddle plates welded to pipe. We have provided vent holes on saddle plates in accordance with ASME B31.3. We have used these saddle plates at support locations as a protective shield to pipe. Now we would like to close the vent hole by seal welding after completion of saddle welding with pipe and carrying out PWHT. Permanent closing of vent hole is required to avoid corrosion in offshore conditions. Service is crude oil with H2S i.e. NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 is applicable. Kindly advise us about the acceptance of seal welding for these service conditions. Answer: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot provide guidance on the acceptability of seal welding in this application. It is the responsibility of the equipment user to decide whether NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 is applicable to these seal welds. The applicability of this standard is described in Clause 1 Scope. If this standard is considered applicable then the seal welds must comply with the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 7.3.3 or NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 6.2.2. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.3.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-21 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pressure Vessel and Pipe Support Plates Vessel support lug’s attachment plate https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pressure Vessel and Pipe Support Plates Pipe support saddle plate with bleed hole https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pressure Vessel and Pipe Support Plates Pipe support saddle plate with bleed hole https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang TROLL C- Offshore Piping and Process Vessels https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 74. In the NACE MR0175 butt weld survey criteria what is the acceptance criteria of middle points Question: Ref Part 2 Figure 2 Butt Weld Survey method for Vickers Hardness Measurement. Location points 17 18 19. What are the acceptance criteria Table A.1 only provides acceptance for the Weld Cap and Root. As the area is not exposed should the acceptance level be 275 HV 10 Answer: Since it is not at the cap the acceptance level should be 250 HV 10 unless it is proven that it can be relaxed. For now there is no demonstrated evidence to show that 250 Hv can be relaxed at location points 17 18 and 19 of Part 2 Figure 2. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.3.3 Figure 2 Table A.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-04 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Hardness Survey Indentation Points 919 indentations- Weld root 12345678 indentations – Weld cap 919 indentations- Weld root https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.1 — Maximum acceptable hardness values for carbon steel carbon-manganese steel and low-alloy steel welds https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 75. Is it acceptable to use HV 500g microhardness testing for NACE applications for WPS qualification Question: Is it acceptable to use HV 500g microhardness testing for NACE applications for WPS qualification I understand that Paragraph 7.3.3.2 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 says that hardness testing shall normally be carried out using HV 10kg or HV 5kg which is our usual practice. FYI the hardness testing was done with HV 500g on CSA Z245.1 Grade 359 pipe material. Answer: Yes subject to the agreement of the equipment user. Please see NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Para. 7.3.3.2. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.3.3.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 76. According to NACE MR0175 is 22HRC and PWHT required Question: Section 7.3.3.2 states: "The HRC method may be used for welding procedure qualification. . . And the welding procedure specification includes post-weld heat treatment" and Clause A.2.1.4 states: "As-welded carbon steels carbon manganese steels and low alloy steels that comply with the hardness requirements of Table A.1 do not require postweld heat treatment." It is confusing whether the latter statement implies that an as-welded carbon steel carbon manganese steel or low alloy steel would require a PWHT if only HRC hardness testing is performed. Per Section 7.3.3.2 I would say yes it does require PWHT. But if the as-welded hardness survey meets the 22 HRC limit then doesnt the as-welded material "comply with the hardness requirements of Table A.1 as stated in clause A.2.1.4 Answer: For carbon carbon manganese and low alloy steels hardness testing for welding procedure qualification PQR may be performed by the HRC method only if the design stress does not exceed 2/3 SMYS and PWHT is perform. If PQR hardness testing is performed by the 7.3.3.2 specified HV or HR15N methods the restrictions for design stress and PWHT are not required. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.3.3.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-14 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Post Weld Heat Treatment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Post Weld Heat Treatment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 77. In NACE MR0175 what does "as close as possible to but no more than 1mm from the fusion boundary" mean Question: Per 7.3.3.3 Using the Vickers or Rockwell 15N measurement methods hardness impressions 2 6 and 10 should be entirely within the heat-affected zone and located as close as possible to but no more than 1mm from the fusion boundary between the weld overlay and HAZ." Is a correct interpretation that when welding dissimilar metals such as corrosion resistant overlays on low alloy steels the phrase "as close as possible to but no more than 1mm from the fusion boundary" means that the indentation should be no less than 3x the mean diagonal length of the indentation from the fusion boundary as is required for adjacent indentations in ISO 6507-1:1998 Note: ISO 6507-1:1998 is referenced by NACE/ISO 15156-2 in the first paragraph of Section 7.3.3.2 Hardness testing methods for welding procedure qualification. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel cannot provide an interpretation of the ISO 6507-1:1998 in relation to the minimum distance of hardness indentations from the boundary between the base metal and the overlay weld. As stated in ISO 15156-2 7.3.3.2 and ISO 15156-3 6.2.2.2.2 hardness measurements can also be carried out using a smaller indentation load for example HV5 rather than HV10 and in many cases this will allow compliance with the requirements of ISO 15156-2 Fig. 6. It is important to recognize that there will be a gradient in HAZ hardness in any case and thus measurements too far from the fusion boundary could be un-conservative. In all cases it is the task of the equipment user and hence the supplier to ensure that the hardness values measured are the most representative possible of the cracking resistance of the welded material in any sour service it is expected to experience. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.3.3.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-01Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang In all cases it is the task of the equipment user and hence the supplier to ensure that the hardness values measured are the most representative possible of the cracking resistance of the welded material in any sour service it is expected to experience. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 78. About welds in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Item 7.3.3.4 "hardness acceptance criteria for welds" "weld hardness acceptance criteria for steels selected using option 1 see 7.1 shall be as specified in A.2.1.4. Alternative weld hardness acceptance criteria may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B." So in our understanding if our welding procedure qualifications WPSs are qualified in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Item A.2.1.4 it is not necessary to test them according to NACE TM0177. We would like you to confirm whether our interpretation below is correct and if not give us the correct interpretation. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: About welds in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Item 7.3.3.4 “hardness acceptance criteria for welds” “weld hardness acceptance criteria for steels selected using option 1 see 7.1 shall be as specified in A.2.1.4. Alternative weld hardness acceptance criteria may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B.” So in our understanding if our welding procedure qualifications WPSs are qualified in accordance with NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Item A.2.1.4 it is not necessary to test them according to NACE TM0177. We would like you to confirm whether our interpretation below is correct and if not give us the correct interpretation. Answer: Your interpretation is correct. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3.3.4 Hardness acceptance criteria for welds Weld hardness acceptance criteria for steels selected using option 1 see 7.1 shall be as specified in A.2.1.4. Alternative weld hardness acceptance criteria may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B. Weld-hardness acceptance criteria for steels qualified and/or selected using option 2 see 7.2 may be established from successful SSC testing of welded samples. SSC testing shall be in accordance with Annex B. Complying with hardness is the mandatory requirement for welding of material selected from Appendix A. All selected material including weld consumable shall be within the App. A specified https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 and NACE TM0177–WELDS On the other hand if we make the test in accordance with NACE TM0177 in our WPSs that are previously qualified to conform to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 what kind of results will we have Will we have necessary or redundant results Answer: A manufacturer may choose to qualify a welding procedure specification in accordance with ANNEX B. Testing welds acceptable in accordance with A.2.1.4 is an optional activity chosen by the manufacturer to confirm resistance to cracking. This is not necessarily a redundant result depending on the anticipated service conditions and the selected test environment the results could be used:  to confirm that the hardness control specified in A.2.1.4 is adequate to prevent sulfide stress cracking  or to define alternative weld hardness control requirements that will not lead to sulfide stress cracking when the requirements of A.2.1.4 are not met. Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-08 Q1 Q2 and Q3 This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Clause 7 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE TM0177 Testing https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE TM0177 Testing https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 80. According to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 is there a maximum sulfur content for carbon steel SMLS pipe Question: According to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Paragraph 8 HIC test is not mandatory for carbon steel SMLS pipe. But what about maximum sulfur content Do we have to apply maximum sulfur content requirement to carbon steel regardless of HIC test Answer: There are no requirements for the control of the chemistry of any elements to prevent HIC in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. Some guidance concerning acceptable sulfur levels is given in Section 8 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2. For seamless products testing can also be performed according to Table B.3 if deemed necessary. This question relates to Part 2 paragraph 8 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-15 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 81. What is NACE MR0175 acceptance criteria for HIC / NACE TM0284 Question: It appears that ISO 15156-2 is ambiguous in defining the acceptance criteria for HIC testing. Section B.5 and Table B.3 refer to NACE TM0284. This TM prescribes CLR CTR and CSR results to be reported for each of the three sections taken from a specimen and also as the average per specimen. Q1. Could you please confirm that the intention of Section B.5 and Table B.3 is that the requirements of NACE TM0284 for the evaluation of test specimens should be followed and that CLR CTR and CSR should be calculated and reported for each section and the average for each test specimen. Table B.3 does not specify if the criteria apply to the single section numbers or to the averages per specimen or to the averages over a series of specimens. The last of these was suggested recently to us for qualification purposes by a materials manufacturer. ISO 3183- 3 the successor to API 5L uses the same CLR CTR and CSR values as criteria as ISO 15156 but in addition it mentions that averages per specimen should be measured against the acceptance criteria not single section numbers. I think it is common practice to apply this approach. If one decides that the acceptance criteria are to be applied to single sections I do not believe that using in addition the same criteria for the average per specimen yields any useful additional information because it is less restrictive but it does no harm either. If however one decides that the acceptance criteria are to be applied only to the average per specimen I am of the opinion that an additional condition should be imposed for single section results or for single crack lengths for instance no single crack length should exceed 5 mm as part of the overall acceptance requirements. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Q2. Are the acceptance criteria intended to apply to the test results of both single section and the average per specimen Q3. Is the intention that in coming to a qualification the CLR CTR and CSR values be calculated by averaging the results for a series of specimens Q4. If they are intended to apply to only the average per specimen what additional requirements should be placed on the results of single section results  ANSI/NACE TM0284-2016 Evaluation of Pipeline and Pressure Vessel Steels for Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking  TM0177-2016 Laboratory Testing of Metals for Resistance to Sulfide Stress Cracking and Stress Corrosion Cracking in H2S Environments https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: A1. Yes. A2. The referenced standard NACE TM0284 Paragraph 8.4 requires the calculation and reporting of test results for each of three sections and the average for each test specimen. The application of the acceptance criteria to single section and/or the average for a specimen is subject to agreement between equipment user and the manufacturer. A3. See Answer A.2 above the referenced standard NACE TM0284 makes no mention of calculating results by averaging the results for a series of test specimens. A4. The Maintenance Panel is unable to comment on issues that would involve an extension of the requirements of the standard. Any materials purchaser is free to add requirements beyond those required or made optional by the standard. Any amendment proposal to extend the requirements for single section test results must be submitted in accordance with the requirements outlined in:- 01. Introduction to ISO 15156 maintenance activities Annex C of the web site www.iso.org/iso15156maintenance. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 8 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-11 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang B.5 Test procedures and acceptance criteria to evaluate the resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels to HIC/SWC Test procedures and acceptance criteria shall be in accordance with Table B.3. Testing shall be performed at ambient temperature 25 °C ± 3 °C 77 °F ± 5 °F. Unless otherwise indicated test requirements shall be in accordance with NACE TM0284. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table B.3 — HIC/SWC test procedure and acceptance criteria

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 82. NACE MR0175 does not mention clearly about sulfur restrictions for carbon steels such as ASTM A105 and A216. What are the sulfur limits NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 -2 in section 8 states: "The probability of HIC/SWC is influenced by the steel chemistry and manufacturing route. The level of sulfur in the carbon and low alloy steel is of particular importance“ At Oil Gas Corrosion we help clients to develop material specifications that specify sulfur contents in order to meet NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 and that consider integrity threats throughout service life including HIC SWC and SOHIC. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: NACE MR0175 /ISO 15156 does not mention clearly about sulfur restrictions for carbon steel forgings and castings to ASTM-A105 and ASTM-A216 respectively. These two specs are work-horse of any oil/gas processing industry. Almost 75 to 90 of materials of construction would fall into these specifications. For example: flanges and fittings and valves and rotating machinery casings. The paragraph A.2.1.3 states: A.2.1.3 Carbon steels acceptable with revised or additional restrictions In addition to the restrictions of A.2.1.2 some carbon steels are acceptable subject to the revised or additional restrictions as follows. a Forgings produced in accordance with ASTM A 105 are acceptable if the hardness does not exceed 187 HBW. Please note: In the original standards ASTM-A105 allows sulfur up to 0.040 and ASTM A 216 allows sulfur up to 0.045. However NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Section 8 says: Conventional forgings with sulfur levels less than 0.025 and castings are not normally considered sensitive to HIC or SOHIC. The above statement means ASTM A 105 forgings are acceptable if sulfur is limited to 0.025 and hardness to 187 HBW Castings have no additional sulfur limit other than specified in the base spec. for example: 0.045 for ASTM-A216. The document has reference to many casting and forging grades but these two grades are not adequately covered. ASTM A 216 is not covered at all. It would be appreciated if NACE clearly makes mention of these two important materials with limitations if any clearly stated. Would such changes be possible Answer: It is outside the scope of the standard to provide information concerning the "limitations" of ASTM A 105 and ASTM A 216 in the specific form you request.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 83. Is 243 Brinell acceptable for carbon steels in accordance with NACE MR0175 / ISO15156-2 Table A.1 Question: I am writing to you to ask for clarification regarding NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 We have a part here which was welded and PWHT and the subsequent hardness check revealed a hardness on the weld cap of 243 Brinell. Our engineering department dispositioned this as acceptable in accordance with Table A.1 as Section A.2.1.4 suggests that "Acceptable maximum hardness values for carbon steel carbon manganese steel and low-alloy steel welds are given in Table A.1." An independent Competent Body Lloyds Register however has pointed out that Table A.1 mentions "Hardness test locations for welding procedure qualification" utilizing Vickers and Rockwell hardness techniques. Can you please therefore confirm if NACE compliant production welding can be accepted in accordance with this Table or is it merely for weld procedure qualification. Answer: Hardness measurements must be performed according to § 7.3.3 using Vickers hardness HV 10 or 5 or Rockwell 15N methods. Brinell hardness method is subject to the acceptance of the equipment user. Table A.1 applies to qualification and production hardness values. However since 243 Brinell is above 250 HV or 22 HRC but below the alternate weld cap limit of 275 HV it requires “equipment user” acceptance and also to obey the two other listed requirements in Table A.1. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A T able A.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-05 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 84. In NACE MR0175 when is a "qualification" required Question: Could you please define the word "Qualification." In our understanding qualification is required for new materials that are not listed in Table A.2 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. We would like you to confirm that our interpretation is correct and if not what is your position Answer: Table A.2 of ISO 15156-2 gives examples of materials that can be qualified provided they comply with Paragraph A.2.1. If not listed in Table A.2 materials must be assessed in the terms of the requirements given in Annex A as explained in Paragraph 7 of Part 1. Again it is up to the equipment user to decide if materials need further qualification through testing or field experience as explained in Paragraph 8 of Part 1. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A T able A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 85. In NACE MR0175 does the term “hot rolled” only apply to sheet or plate material and cannot be applied to the forming of butt weld fittings Question: Does the term “hot rolled” referred to in Paragraph A.2.1.2 only apply to sheet or plate material and as such cannot be applied to the forming of butt weld fittings Answer: Yes “hot rolled” in the view of the Maintenance Panel does not apply to the forming of butt weld fittings. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 86. Can "as-forged" material be certified to NACE MR0175 Question: Often my company is asked by customers to certify our forgings to NACE MR0175. It is my understanding from them that our competition including imports certifies to MR0175 without normalizing and consequently we are pressured to do the same. We have three presses two are fed by gas-fired furnaces and one is with induction heaters. The gas heat forgings are typically heated to 2300 to 2350°F and forged on a 900T or 3500T open die press in a tooling pot then still air cooled to ambient. The forgings heated by induction are heated to similar temperatures but only a portion of a bar and the flange end is forged close to shape then air cooled in still air. Customers can order these forgings in the "as forged" or "normalized" condition per SA105. My question is do we have to normalize the forgings coming from either forging process in order to certify to NACE MR0175 The problem is interpretation of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2:2003E page 17 Annex A Paragraph A.2.1.2. The heat- treated condition "hot-rolled" is not clearly understood and competitors with similar processes interpret that if the entire raw material piece prior to forge lets call it a mult is taken to 2300 to 2350°F prior to forge that this satisfies the "hot-rolled" definition. We have contended that our products need to be subsequently followed with a normalizing cycle after being fully cooled to ambient in order to be certified to NACE and that neither of the forging processes listed above satisfies the definition of "hot- rolled" process. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Hot-forged material does not meet the intent of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 A.2.1.2a. An exception to this statement is given in A.2.1.3a. Other hot-forged materials would have to be treated according to one of the five other heat-treatment conditions described in Paragraph A.2.1.2 to comply with this standard. As a consequence ASTM A 105 material is acceptable in the "as-forged" condition not because it is equivalent to a "hot rolled" condition in A.2.1.2 but because it is a permitted exception in A.2.1.3.a. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-25 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 87. Is ASTM A105 Class 150 flange in the non-normalized is acceptable to NACE MR0175 Question: Would a forged ASTM A105 Class 150 flange in the non-normalized condition be in accordance with NACE MR0175 and NACE MR0103 Answer: The ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel can only answer for NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 not for NACE MR0103. AS FORGED is not an acceptable condition in A.2.1.2. Both requirements of A.2.1.2. and A.2.1.3 of Part 2 must be fulfilled for ASTM A 105 flanges to meet NACE MR0175/ISO 15156. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 88. In NACE MR0175 are tubulars with SMYS below 52ksi exempt of hardness testing Question: Per A.2.1.4 "Tubular products with an SMYS not exceeding 360 MPa 52ksi and listed in Table A.2 are acceptable in the as-welded condition. For these products hardness testing of welding procedures may be waived if agreed by the equipment user". Is a correct interpretation that all hardness testing is being waived for tubular products with an SMYS not exceeding 52ksi in the as-welded condition if as agreed by the equipment user Answer: No tubular products listed in Table A.2 with an SMYS not exceeding 360 MPa 52 ksi are acceptable in the as welded condition. For these products hardness testing OF WELDING PROCEDURES may be waived if agreed by the equipment user. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-01Q1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NOTE: Hardness testing on WPS could be waived with hardness testing on parent metal remains https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 89. For NACE MR0175 compliance of carbon steels whats the maximum hardness after PWHT Question: A.2.1.4 Welding Paragraph 6 states: "Carbon steel and low-alloy steel weldments that do not comply with other paragraphs of this subclause shall be stress-relieved at a minimum temperature of 620 °C 1 150 °F after welding. The maximum weld zone hardness determined in accordance with 7.3 shall be 250 HV or subject to the restrictions described in 7.3.3 22 HRC." This particular paragraph does not refer to Table A.1 Maximum acceptable hardness values for carbon steel carbon-manganese steel and low-alloy steel welds which states that weld cap hardness can be 275 HV with limitations. Could NACE please clarify if Table A.1 should or should not be applicable for stress-relieved weldments. Which hardness value 250 HV or 275 HV shall be applicable for weld cap hardness of stress-relieved weldments Answer Table A.1 gives maximum acceptable values for carbon steel carbon-manganese steel and low alloy steel weldments. It is applicable to welds whether they have been post weld heat treated or not. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 90. Weldment with Nickel greater than 1 does NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-2 subclause A.2.1.4 say they are not acceptable Question: ISO 15156-2 subclause A2.1.4 Welding has the following two paragraphs: "Carbon steel and low-alloy steel weldments that do not comply with other paragraphs of this subclause shall be stress-relieved at a minimum temperature of 620 °C 1150 °F after welding. The maximum weld zone hardness determined in accordance with 7.3 shall be 250 HV or subject to the restrictions described in 7.3.3 22 HRC". "Welding consumables and procedures that produce a deposit containing more than 1 mass fraction nickel are acceptable after successful weld SSC qualification by testing in accordance with Annex B". Based on this I interpret the requirements as follows: If there are weldments with Ni contents greater than 1 mass fraction they can be accepted if the weld procedures are successfully tested to SSC qualification in accordance with Annex B. Alternately weldments with Ni contents greater than 1 mass fraction shall be acceptable if stress-relieved at a minimum temperature of 620 °C 1150 °F after welding. The maximum weld zone hardness shall be 250HV or 22 HRC in that case. Please can you confirm the interpretation. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: The intent of the next to last paragraph in A.2.1.4 15156-2 Annex A dealing with the 620C 1150F SR option does not negate the requirement in the following paragraph which requires SSC qualification testing regardless of SR if the weld deposit is 1 Ni. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-07 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The intent of the next to last paragraph in A.2.1.4 15156-2 Annex A dealing with the 620C 1150F SR option does not negate the requirement in the following paragraph which requires SSC qualification testing regardless of SR if the weld deposit is 1 Ni. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 91. Does NACE MR0175 require PWHT of overlay weld inconel 625 Question: We have weld overlays Inconel 625 filler metal with SAW process applied to low-alloy ferritic steel valves ASME/ASTM A 352 Gr LCC. The steel valve is used on wet gas wellhead production platform with operating temperatures at 93°C operating pressure of 145 bar with vapor fraction of H2S 177 kg-mol/h and CO2 877 kg-mol/h. Hardness tests were performed on the as-welded condition. The results achieved were well below the 250 HV criteria of Table A.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2. Since the hardness results complied with the requirements of Table A.1 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 we believe and understand that the valve does not require postweld heat treatment after the weld overlay. Having met the hardness criteria after overlay we believe that we met the requirements of the following paragraphs of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2: -Paragraph A.2.1.5 and -Paragraph A.2.1.4 Question: Is our interpretation of Paragraphs A.2.1.5 and A.2.1.4 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 correct based on the above-stated specific application and conditions and that the valves overlayed with Inconel 625 consumables do not require postweld heat treatment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: Paragraph A.2.1.4 states in the third sentence: “As welded carbon steels carbon manganese steels and low-alloy steels that comply with the hardness requirements of Table A.1 do not require postweld heat treatment.” Paragraph A.2.1.5 states: “Overlays applied by thermal processes such as welding . . . are acceptable if they comply with one of the following: a The heat-treated condition of the substrate is unchanged i.e. it does not exceed the lower critical temperature during application of the overlay. b The maximum hardness and final heat-treated condition of the base metal substrate comply with A.2.1.2 and in the case of welded overlays A.2.1.4. Therefore your interpretation is correct. Provided your weld procedure qualification complies with the hardness requirements in A.2.1.4 and A.2.1.5 no postweld heat treatment is required. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.4 and A.2.1.5 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-11 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Weld Overlays https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Weld Overlays https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Weld Overlays https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 92. NACE MR0175 and surface treatments to prevent SSC Question: ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Section A.2.1.5 Surface Treatments Overlays Plating Coatings Linings etc. This section states that metallic coatings such as electroless nickel plating are not acceptable for preventing SSC. It was my understanding that the qualification of a plated part was dependent on the base metal. If the base metal is in conformance with MR0175 then the part can be qualified regardless of what plating or coating may be applied. Is my understanding correct Answer: The application and use of metallic plating that does not affect the ISO 15156 compliant base material is not prohibited. No metallic platings are listed as acceptable or unacceptable in ISO 15156 but the use of any surface treatments to prevent SSC is not acceptable. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1.5 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-13 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 93. For NACE MR0175 compliant products is Carburizing an acceptable surface treatment process Q1: For NACE MR0175 compliant products is Carburizing an acceptable surface treatment process A1 Carburizing is not currently permitted in ISO 15156 except in conjunction with the permitted exclusions in Table 1 of ISO 15156-2. These exclusions are associated with specific equipment that is loaded in compression and equipment that is outside the scope of ISO 15156. Q2: If Carburizing is not considered the same as Nitriding in paragraph A. 2.1.5 is it acceptable to have carburized surface treatment where the surface hardness will be well over HRC 22 hardness but the core to meet the maximum average hardness of 22 HRC A2: Carburizing is not permitted regardless of core hardness except as noted in Q1. Q3: If Carburizing is acceptable surface treatment method can the max hardness HRC 22 and Nickel content max 1 of the core of carburized part be allowed to be higher than what NACE MR0175 allows A3: Not applicable. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.1.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-04 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 94. Does NACE MR0175 accepts 26HRC for temporary pipework Question: We need a clarification on MR0175/ISO 15156 Part 2 Annex A. We are a manufacturer of temporary pipe work flowlines etc. for sour gas service in well testing and process use in a surface application. As such we believe Paragraphs A.2.1 through A.2.4 and Table A.1 with a hardness limit of 22 HRC are applicable in these circumstances. However pipe suppliers in this region tell us that 26 HRC is acceptable in such applications. I believe the 26 HRC limit is only applicable to material used in a downhole application as in Paragraph A.2.2.3 etc. i.e. not a surface application and that this is in error in terms of our usage. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: ISO 15156-2 A.2.2.1 indicates that carbon and low alloy steels for use in any product form must comply with the requirements of A.2.1 which include the hardness requirement of maximum 22 HRC for the parent material. Exceptions to this rule are named specifically in other paragraphs of Annex A. Welds in such materials shall comply with the requirements of A.2.1.4 that also refers to Table A.1 that sets hardness requirements for welds. Sub-clause A.2.2.2 provides examples of materials that can comply with A.2.1 including some examples of tubular products in Table A.2. Sub-clause A.2.2.3 addresses downhole components only. The standard allows materials such as AISI 4130 to be qualified at higher hardness than 22 HRC for possible use as pipe in sour service by laboratory testing in accordance with Annex B and Table B.1 or on the basis of field experience as described in ISO 15156-1 8.2. Welds must be shown to comply with the requirements of Paragraph 7.3.3.4. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.2.1 A.2.2.2 and A.2.2.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-23 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.2.3.2 Tubulars and tubular components made of Cr-Mo low-alloy steels UNS G41XX0 formerly AISI 41XX and modifications if quenched and tempered in the tubular form are acceptable if their hardness does not exceed 30 HRC and they have SMYS grades of 690 MPa 100 ksi 720 MPa 105 ksi and 760 MPa 110 ksi. The maximum yield strength for each grade shall be no more than 103 Mpa 15 ksi higher than the SMYS. SSC resistance shall be demonstrated by testing each test batch and shall comply with B.1 using the UT test. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 95. What are the NACE MR0175 requirements for risers choke kill and booster lines Question: We have a request for interpretation of item A.2.2.3.3 of ISO 15156-2. It states that “tubulars and tubular components made of Cr-Mo low alloy steels UNS G41XX0 formerly AISI 41XX and modifications if quenched and tempered in the tubular form are acceptable if the hardness does not exceed 26 HRC. These products should be qualified by SSC testing in accordance with B.1 using the UT test.” We use AISI 4130 tubes in the quenched and tempered condition for drilling riser P-lines choke kill and booster lines and have at present a hardness limit of HRC 22. The relaxation of above hardness requirement to HRC 26 would be helpful in production of the pipes as well as weldments. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: Paragraph A.2.2.3.3 of ISO 15156-2 is applicable to downhole casing tubing and tubular components used in region 3 of the diagram in Paragraph 7.2. Materials for P-lines in drilling risers are not included in Paragraph A.2.2.3.3. Materials for P-lines used in Region 3 are hardness limited to HRC 22. The point you raise concerning Inquiry 2005-23 is valid since testing according to Table B.1 in Annex B is one of the accepted qualification methods. Testing can be used to qualify any material/application including 4130/P-lines in drilling risers provided it is performed according to ISO 15156 requirements. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.2.2 and A.2.2.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-04 Note: A.2.2.3 Downhole casing tubing and tubular components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.2 Application to product forms A.2.2.1 General Except as modified below the general requirements of A.2.1 shall apply to all product forms. A.2.2.2 Pipe plate and fittings A.2.2.3 Downhole casing tubing and tubular components A.2.2.4 Bolting and fasteners A.2.1.2 Parent metal composition heat treatment and hardness Carbon and low-alloy steels are acceptable at 22 HRC maximum hardness provided they contain less than 1 mass fraction https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.3 Application to equipment A.2.3.1 General A.2.3.2 Drilling blowout preventers A.2.3.3 Compressors and pumps

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-2:2015E A.2.1.2 Parent metal composition heat treatment and hardness Carbon and low-alloy steels are acceptable at 22 HRC maximum hardness provided they contain less than 1 mass fraction nickel are not free-machining steels and are used in one of the following heat treatment conditions: a hot-rolled carbon steels only b annealed c normalized d normalized and tempered e normalized austenitized quenched and tempered f austenitized quenched and tempered. A.2.1.3 Carbon steels acceptable with revised or additional restrictions In addition to the restrictions of A.2.1.2 some carbon steels are acceptable subject to the following revised or additional restrictions. a Forgings produced in accordance with ASTM A105 are acceptable if the hardness does not exceed 187 HBW. b Wrought pipe fittings to ASTM A234 grades WPB and WPC are acceptable if the hardness does not exceed 197 HBW. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.1.2 Parent metal composition heat treatment and hardness Carbon and low-alloy steels are acceptable at 22 HRC maximum hardness provided they contain less than 1 mass fraction nickel are not free- machining steels and are used in one of the following heat treatment conditions: a hot-rolled carbon steels only b annealed c normalized d normalized and tempered e normalized austenitized quenched and tempered f austenitized quenched and tempered. Does it mean ALL Carbon and low-alloy steels are acceptable satisfying the above conditions With the exception stated for A.2.1.3 on Forgings produced in accordance with ASTM A105 and Wrought pipe fittings to ASTM A234 grades WPB and WPC both with lower maximum hardness limitations . It could be more exception https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Carbon and low-alloy steels are acceptable at 22 HRC maximum hardness provided they contain less than 1 mass fraction nickel are not free- machining steels and are used in one of the specified heat treatment conditions. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Kobel Steel 神户钢铁 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 96. What does NACE MR0175 require from dissimilar welds without filler Question: My employer manufactures pressure sensing devices that have a very small sensing diaphragm welded to a threaded port. I am hoping you can provide some clarification regarding welding of dissimilar metals. I am employing the material hardness limits for specific materials from Annex A of ISO 15156-3 in conjunction with the weld survey locations specified in 7.3.3.3 of ISO 15156-2. I believe the hardness requirements are clearly interpreted if welding dissimilar metals by use of a third weld-filler metal. Hardness requirements can be clearly applied to each of the weld survey locations for all three involved parent materials. However I do not know how to apply the hardness requirements when two materials are welded directly together without the use of a third weld-filler metal. 1. If the two materials have different hardness limits what is the hardness requirement for the weld survey locations within the weld metal region non parent material nor HAZ regions 2. Is the hardness limit governed by the higher of the two material limits or the lower of the two 3. Can you tell me where I can find clarification in these standards or where I can direct my question 4. On an unrelated note I would like to suggest a minor improvement to table A.1 of ISO 15156-3 Annex A. In T able A.6 Note-B defines the table applicable to “…diaphragms pressure measuring devices and pressure seals.” Table A.1 would be improved if “A.6” was specified in the first column Austenitic stainless steel for the row designated for “Diaphragms pressure measuring devices and pressure seals”. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: 1. The hardness requirements for each material shall be met for both the base metal and HAZ. The standard does not specify requirements for the fusion line hardness between two dissimilar metals with different maximum hardness requirements. Qualification by successful laboratory testing in accordance with Annex B of ISO 15156-3 is required. Qualification based on satisfactory field experience is also acceptable. Such qualification shall comply with ISO 15156-1. 2. See answer to point 1 3. See answer to point 1. 4. This is an editorial improvement and this will be changed. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-04 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 97. Flame spraying is it allowed in NACE MR0175 Question: We have some 316 stainless steel housings with a large through bore machined. Inadvertently this bore was machined oversize. We would like to flame spray build up the surface with 316 or 316L stainless material and remachine to size. As we understand the standard 316 and 316L stainless are both included in a lengthy list of materials accepted for direct exposure to sour gas. As we intend to apply stainless to stainless for the purpose of remachining to dimension and not as a corrosion-inhibiting coating would this process be acceptable and compliant with the NACE Standard MR0175/ISO 15156 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: 1.0 Flame spraying as a coating for corrosion resistance over a base material that is resistant to sulfide stress cracking is acceptable within the requirements of NACE MR0175/ISO15156 Part 2 Paragraph A.2.1.5 when applied over carbon steels and of Part 3 Paragraph A.1.5.1. In the case of your inquiry the 316 or 316L base materials are acceptable coating substrates if they conform to the metallurgical requirements of Part 3 Table A.2 and are used within the environmental restrictions of this table for any equipment. 2.0 If this application of flame spray is for the replacement of material that will be load bearing of tensile stresses then the inquiry is not currently addressed by NACE MR0175/ISO15156. NACE/ISO have not been balloted with data to demonstrate that the 316 SS or 316L SS deposited flame spray coating has the same cracking resistance as the materials referenced in Part 3 Table A.2 which are assumed to be in the cast or wrought conditions. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.1.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-01 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-2:2015E A.2.1.5 Surface treatments overlays plating coatings linings etc. NOTE The composition and cracking resistance of overlays are addressed in ISO 15156-3. ISO 15156-3:2015E A.13 Cladding overlays and wear-resistant alloys A.13.1 Corrosion-resistant claddings linings and overlays The materials listed and defined in A.2 to A.11 can be used as corrosion- resistant claddings linings or as weld overlay materials. The overlay material shall be as materials listed and defined in A.2 to A.11 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 98. For NACE MR0175 compliant products is Carburizing is an acceptable surface treatment process Carburizing is not currently permitted in ISO 15156 except in conjunction with the permitted exclusions in Table 1 of ISO 15156-2. These exclusions are associated with specific equipment that is loaded in compression and equipment that is outside the scope of ISO 15156. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.1.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-04Q1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 99. If Carburizing is not considered the same as Nitriding in paragraph A. 2.1.5 is it acceptable to have carburized surface treatment where the surface hardness will be well over HRC 22 hardness but the core to meet the maximum average hardness of 22 HRC Carburizing is not permitted regardless of core hardness except as noted in Q1. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.1.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-04Q2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 100. If Carburizing is acceptable surface treatment method can the max hardness HRC 22 and Nickel content max 1 of the core of carburized part be allowed to be higher than what NACE MR0175 allows Not applicable. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex A.1.5.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-04Q3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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