NACE MR0175 CRA Exam- Reading 2a Q&A

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NACE MR0175 CRA Exam Note

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE MR0175- CRA Written Exam My Reading 2 QA 150 2017 Nov 24 th

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Oil Exploration Production

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

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闭门练功 Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭门练功

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 闭 门 练 功

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NACE MR0175 Written Exam Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: On issues related to the electrochemical and electrotechnical standardization the ISO the International Organization for Standardization collaborate closely with which organization a The IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers b The IEC International Electrotechnical Commission c The National boiler association d The local electric company Foreword

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent rights. ISO generally will a Grant the user of this document to use the copy right materials patent and trade name. b Grant the user the right to use the copy right materials at a cost. c Cooperate with the copy right owner on the uses of copy right material d Copy right trade name and patent appeared this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not constitute an endorsement. Foreword

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: Which of the EFC European Federation of Corrosion documents complementary to this standards a The EFC 10 Marine Corrosion of Stainless Steels: Chlorination and Microbial Aspects b The EFC 16 Guidelines on Materials Requirements for Carbon and Low Alloy Steels for H 2 S-Containing Environments in Oil and Gas Production The EFC 17 Corrosion Resistant Alloys for Oil and Gas Production: Guidance on General Requirements and Test Methods for H 2 S Service c The EFC 28 Electrochemical Approach to Selected Corrosion and Corrosion Control Studies Electrochemical Approach to Selected Corrosion and Corrosion Control Studies d The standard is not complemented by EFC http://efcweb.org/Publications/List+of+EFC+Publications.html Introduction

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: Which of the NACE TM Testing Methods complementary to this standards a NACE TM0177 Laboratory Testing of Metals for Resistance to Sulfide Stress Cracking and Stress Corrosion Cracking in H 2 S Environments b NACE TM0284 Evaluation of Pipeline and Pressure Vessel Steels for Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking c NACE 0472 Methods and Controls to Prevent In-Service Environmental Cracking of Carbon Steel Weldments in Corrosive Petroleum Refining Environments d NACE 0176 Corrosion Control Of Steel Fixed Offshore Structures Associated With Petroleum Production e NACE 0103 Petroleum petrochemical and natural gas industries -- Metallic materials resistant to sulfide stress cracking in corrosive petroleum refining environments Introduction

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Suggested Study Material NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Standard EFC 17 NACE TM0177 NACE TM0198 NACE TM0316 Introduction

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE TM0284 Evaluation of Pipeline and Pressure Vessel Steels for Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE TM0284 Evaluation of Pipeline and Pressure Vessel Steels for Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang NACE TM0284 Evaluation of Pipeline and Pressure Vessel Steels for Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Preparation Training Strongly Recommended One day NACE MR0175 Workshop Designed to help you and your company prevent corrosion stress cracking in H2S containing oil production environments attend a NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 One-Day Seminar to understand how the standard can be implemented to improve the quality of your company’s assets and what you can do to comply with the standard. NACE Internationals’ MR0175/ISO 15156 is the premier standard to reference in combatting corrosion cracking through material selection and qualification and the seminar is for anyone from entry level to experienced oil production professionals to gain a thorough knowledge of this globally mandated standard.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Suggested Study Material NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Standard EFC 17 NACE TM0177 NACE TM0198 NACE TM0316 Books Introductory Handbook for NACE MR0175 Other Materials Performance inquires and answers see NACE website http://www.nace.org/resources/magazines-and-journal/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 1. NACE TM0177 “Laboratory Testing of Metals for Resistance to Sulfide Stress Cracking and Stress Corrosion Cracking in H2S Environments” 2. NACE TM0284 “Evaluation of Pipeline and Pressure Vessel Steels for Resistance to Hydrogen-Induced Cracking” This document is not in the suggested reading list 3. NACE TM0198-2016 "Slow Strain Rate Test Method for Screening Corrosion-Resistant Alloys CRAs for Stress Corrosion Cracking in Sour Oilfield Service" 4. NACE TM0316-2016 “Four-Point Bend Testing of Materials for Oil and Gas Applications”

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: How the standard adopts revisions and changes a By NACE MR0175 Committee. b By ISO official organization employee. c By the ISO 15156 maintenance committee ballot of representative groups from within the oil and gas production industry. d By ANSI committee

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: When found necessary by oil and gas production industry experts future interim changes to this part of ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 how change will be implemented a Changes in the form of Technical Corrigenda or Technical Circulars will be issued and available for purchase from NACE. b Changes in the form of Technical Corrigenda or Technical Circulars will be issued and available for purchase from ISO. c Changes in the form of Technical Corrigenda or Technical Circulars will be issued and available for reviews on internet on NACE and ISO websites. d Changes will be ammended immediately into the standards when ever there is a change. https://www.din.de/blob/70772/4b365841abe618778dfffb17ed16b40c/iso-15156-1-2009-technical-circular-1-2014-01-27-data.pdf https://www.din.de/blob/62122/e3cc63a6bbdb4236a45d3fa491510495/iso-15156-3-2009-technical-circular-3-2014-01-27-data.pdf Introduction

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5. In NACE MR0175 are all bolts required to comply even external flange bolts I have a query in respect to the identification of the sour environment for deciding whether a bolting alloy shall conform to the general requirements of A.2.1 as reuired by A.2.2.4 where the bolting material is denied direct atmosphere exposure. An example best illustrates my question. In a pressure containing piping or vessel it is clear that the partial pressure of H2S within the pressure containment determines whether the piping or vessel is exposed to sour service. Flange bolting is located ourside the vessel and the piping and flange protection systems are seldom pressure containing enclosures. If a leak occurs the partial pressure of H2S will be reduced according to the ratio of the external pressure typically 1 atm or 100 kPa to the total pressure internal to the vessel. My question then is whether it is the partial pressure of H2S in the external environment or the partial pressure of H2S in the internal environment that is used to determine whether the bolting material is in sour service. Answer The equipment user is responsible for defining the intended service environment and selecting materials in accordance with this standard. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Annex A.2.1 and A.2.2.4 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2011-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6. NACE MR0175 austenitic stainless steels Table A.2 and the technical circulars. Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3: 2009E Table A2 NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3: 2009/Cir.2:2013E Table A2 As long as the partial pressure of H2S is below 15 psi and Flowing medium temperature is below 140 DEG F Any combinations of chloride concentration and in situ pH occurring in production environments are acceptable and materials as suggested under clause A2 “Austenitic stainless steels” can be selected. Answer: As long as your definition of “Flowing medium temperature” is “exposure temperature” your interpretation is correct. Note that these materials shall be of type described in A.2 shall be in the solution-annealed and quenched or annealed and thermally-stabilized heat-treatment condition be free of cold work intended to enhance their mechanical properties and have a maximum hardness of 22 HRC. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-02 Q2 Q3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7. Produced water handling facilities and NACE MR0175 Question: Water handling facilities less than 0.45 MPa I really don’t know what does it mean It means that the possibility of corrosion is low enough to be excluded from the standard requirements Or the consequence of the problem is minimum Can we conclude from the above paragraph that low pressure water handling facilities has no gas to be released which may produce SSC or any hydrogen problems Answer Water handling facilities have typically low service pressure a near neutral pH and they usually contain trace amounts of H2S. Consequently their sour service severity is quite low. However it is the responsibility of the user to check whether these assumptions are correct for the particular equipment considered. This question is in relation to the Scope of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-15 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-3:2015E Table 1 — List of equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-3:2015E Table 1 — List of equipment Permitted exclusions Water-handling facilities operating at a total absolute pressure below 045 MPa 65 psi Water injection and water disposal equipment 045 MPa 65 psi https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 9. What are the NACE MR0175 limits for alloy 718 UNS N07718 Question Our question relates to ISO 15156-3 Table A.32: How should the table be interpreted in terms of the maximum allowable temperature for applications with less than 30 psi partial pressure of H2S For example in its current layout the table prohibits the use of UNS N07718 at temperatures higher than 450°F at any H2S pressure below 30 psi. Answer: ISO 15156-3 Table A.32 does not qualify UNS N07718 for use at higher temperatures than 450°F. The limits on temperature H2S Cl- pH and sulfur defined in some of the tables of ISO 15156-3 Annex A apply collectively and reflect the knowledge available usually from laboratory tests at the time the standard was published. There were no data available related to the use of UNS N07718 at any temperature higher than 450°F. ISO 15156 allows the qualification and use of materials to an equipment users requirements outside the limits stated in the tables. See ISO 15156-3 Figure B.1 Column 2. A qualification to define an alternative temperature limit for UNS N07718 for a partial pressure of H2S less than 30 psi must be carried out in accordance with ISO 15156-3 Annex B. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.9.2 T able A.32 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-20 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.32 — Environmental and materials limits for precipitation- hardened nickel-based alloys II used for any equipment or component https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords  Higher than  below https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 11. NACE MR0175 UNS S31600 S30940 and types 3a and 3b what is the difference Question: We are doing a pipe skid system that requires ASME B31.3 and NACE MR0175 as project requirements. According to A.3.2 of NACE MR0175 T able A.8 lists some material UNS numbers. We are wondering what NACE means by “type 3a” and “3b” max temp 140 deg F. The pipe we were contemplating using was ASTM A312 Gr TP 316. According to another chart we saw that the equivalent URN UNS number for A312 is S30940. What therefore is the maximum temperature rating on S30940 ASTM A316 Gr TP316. Our application is on frame oil where the design values are - 18 to 160 deg C 300 lb. Answer: The definition of materials type 3a and 3b is given at the bottom of Table A.8. It is based on alloy chemical composition. The temperatures given in the tables are the maximum known acceptable values with the given H2S partial pressure pH and chlorides limits. The alloys UNS S31600 and S30940 you are referring to are austenitic stainless steels and are covered by Table A.2 and Clause A.2. The MP does not answer questions concerning specific applications. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.3.2 T able A.8 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.3.2 Environmental and materials limits for the uses of highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels Table A.8 — Environmental and materials limits for highly-alloyed austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components These materials shall also comply with the following:  materials type 3a shall be highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel with w Ni + 2w Mo 30 where wMo has a minimum value of 2 . The symbol w represents the percentage mass fraction of the element indicated by the subscript  materials type 3b shall be highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel with FPREN 400  materials types 3a and 3b including N08926 shall be in the solution- annealed condition  UNS J93254 CK3McuN cast 254SMO in accordance with ASTM A351 ASTM A743 or ASTM A744 shall be in the cast solution heat-treated and water-quenched condition and shall have a maximum hardness of 100 HRB  UNS J95370 shall be in the solution heat-treated and water-quenched condition and shall have a maximum hardness of 94 HRB. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang On: We are wondering what NACE means by “type 3a” and “3b” max temp 140 deg F. The pipe we were contemplating using was ASTM A312 Gr TP 316. According to another chart we saw that the equivalent URN UNS number for A312 is S30940. What therefore is the maximum temperature rating on S30940 ASTM A316 Gr TP316. ASTM A312 / A312M - 17 Standard Specification for Seamless Welded and Heavily Cold Worked Austenitic Stainless Steel Pipe https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 15. According to NACE MR0175 who is responsible to ensure sour service conditions are qualified Question: As stated in Part 1 Clause 5: "Qualification with respect to a particular mode of failure for use in defined service conditions also qualifies a material for use under other service conditions that are equal to or less severe in all respects than the conditions for which qualification was carried out. " The diagram Fig 1 Part 2 defines the severity in terms of the main environmental parameters i.e. H2S partial pressure and pH but other parameters temperature stress level ... must also be considered. It is the equipment users responsibility to ensure the service conditions are equal or less severe "in ALL respects." Answer 1. This interpretation is correct for SSC qualification only since this diagram applies to SSC. If a material is qualified at a point in the diagram it will be qualified for any conditions less severe than these conditions i.e. higher pH and/or lower H2S partial pressure. 2. The diagram Fig 1 Part 2 defines the severity in terms of the main environmental parameters i.e. H2S partial pressure and pH but other parameters particularly stress level temperature ... must also be considered. 3. It is the equipment users responsibility to ensure the service conditions are equal or less severe "in ALL respects.“ 4. Guidance is also given in Part 1 Clause 5: "Qualification with respect to a particular mode of failure for use in defined service conditions also qualifies a material for use under other service conditions that are equal to or less severe in all respects than the conditions for which qualification was carried out". This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.2.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-23 Part 1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ It Is The Equipment Users Responsibility

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang It Is The Equipment Users Responsibility https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 16. NACE MR0175 limits for UNS N06975 and UNS N10276 Question: a NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Sub-clause A.4.2 Table A.14 permits sulfur at 300°F in any H2S partial pressure but not at 425°F. Where if anywhere between 425°F and 300°F are alloys in this category sulfur-resistant If an oil- company client has a well with bottom-hole temperature of 350°F with produced brine that contains sulfur will an alloy like 2550 UNS N06975 be sufficiently resistant b must C-276 UNS N10276 be deployed Answer a In some cases the comparisons you make are not strictly valid because the data sets for the materials considered vary in the H2S limits in the temperature limits and in the metallurgical limits that are imposed. It is thought that the limits given are conservative and further testing could demonstrate that the true limits are less restrictive than those shown. b UNS N10276 would be acceptable. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4.2 Table A.14 and A.33 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-13 Q4 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 1

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Well environment:  Temperature: 350°F  Elemental sulfur Yes Is the following suitable C-276 UNS N10276 Yes/No Given that: 3 UNS N10276 Type 4e when used at a minimum temperature of 121 °C 250 °F shall have a maximum hardness of 45 HRC

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.14 — Environmental and materials limits for annealed and cold-worked solid-solution nickel-based alloys used as any equipment or component a

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-3:2015E Table A.14 — Environmental and materials limits for annealed and cold- worked solid-solution nickel-based alloys used as any equipment or componenta

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Check on the material Type for C-276 UNS N10276

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.12 — Materials types of solid-solution nickel-based alloys

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: C-276 UNS N10276 is Type 4e

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 2

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 16. NACE MR0175 limits for UNS N06975 and UNS N10276 Question: a NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Sub-clause A.4.2 Table A.14 permits sulfur at 300°F in any H2S partial pressure but not at 425°F. Where if anywhere between 425°F and 300°F are alloys in this category sulfur-resistant If an oil- company client has a well with bottom-hole temperature of 350°F with produced brine that contains sulfur will an alloy like 2550 UNS N06975 be sufficiently resistant b must C-276 UNS N10276 be deployed My Answer a Yes. 2550 UNS N06975 is Type 4a https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Well environment:  Temperature: 350°F  Elemental sulfur Yes Is the following suitable 2550 UNS N06975 Yes/No Remark: Workout on 2550 UNS N06975 is Type 4a 4c See worksheet below Table A.13 anneal alloy of Type 4a/4b can be used.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang a. Where a range is shown it indicates min to max percentage mass fractions. b. “Bal.” is the balance of composition up to 100 . c. w Nb shall be eight times wC mass fraction with a maximum of 1 . d. Additional elements by mass fraction: wTa 02 max and wB 0006 max.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.12 — Materials types of solid-solution nickel-based alloys

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.13 — Environmental and materials limits for solid-solution nickel-based alloys used in any equipment or component

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 17. in NACE MR0175 what does “Exposure temperature” mean Design or operating Temperature Question: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3: 2009E What does “Exposure temperature” mean Design or operating Temperature Answer: “The equipment user shall define the exposure temperature” This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 5 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-02 Q1 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 18. In NACE MR0175 Why are tubing and subsurface equipment treated as two separate categories Question: I need to clarify a confusion about NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. Why are tubing and subsurface equipment in Tables A.19 and A.20 respectively treated as two separate categories Tubing itself is subsurface equipment so why is it treated separately Moreover K90941 as mentioned in Table A.20 is recommended for subsurface equipment under any H2S partial pressure but not for tubing exposed to the same condition why L-80 type 13 Cr is more cracking-resistant material than K90941 still it is not recommended for subsurface equipment apart from tubing why We are in a process of developing a sour gas field and purchased a copy of this standard to be a guideline for material selection. We need answers to these questions so we can select the most appropriate material for downhole casing/tubing. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 reflects the experience of the oil industry and its experts in the use of materials in sour service over many years. The separation of materials into T ables A.19 A.20 and A.21 allowed convenient grouping of the data available. In some cases the differences you identify reflect the availability of different product forms manufactured from the different materials. As indicated in the title of Table A.19 ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr is acceptable for other subsurface equipment other than tubing providing the material fully meets the applicable material requirements of ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr. Additionally as indicated in the title and notes of Table A.21 420 modified having the chemical composition of ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr is acceptable for packers and subsurface equipment. In all cases the data presented reflect successful laboratory testing of an alloy or successful field experience with the alloy used in the product form listed. For martensitic alloys not listed in Tables A.19 A.20 and A.21 qualification of the alloy for use in accordance with ISO 15156-3 can be carried out in accordance Annex B. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 T able A.19 A.20 and A.21 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-22 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.6 Martensitic stainless steels identified as individual alloys A.6.2 Environmental and materials limits for the uses of martensitic stainless steels T able A.18 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components T able A.19 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as downhole tubular components and for packers and other subsurface equipment T able A.20 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic alloy steel used as subsurface equipment T able A.21 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as packers and subsurface equipment T able A.22 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as compressor components T able A.23 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as wellhead and tree components and valve and choke components excluding casing and tubing hangers and valve stems https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang As indicated in the title of Table A.19 ISO 11960 L80 type 13Cr is acceptable for other subsurface equipment other than tubing...... Table A.19 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as downhole tubular components and for packers and other subsurface equipment Keypoints: “downhole tubular components” does not include the tubular tubing.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keypoints: “downhole tubular components” does not include the tubular tubing.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keypoint “downhole tubular components” does not include the tubular tubing.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 20. NACE MR0175 SSC Resistant Steels above 0.3 kPa 0.05 psi and the acceptable pH and Cl - limits Question: Sub-clause 7.1.2 says SSC Resistant Steels for partial pressures equal to or above 0.3 kPa 0.05 psi can be selected using A.2. a If criteria like temperature hardness are met do we assume that for all partial pressures above 0.05 psi the suggested SSC-resistant materials could be used E.g. SSC-resistant materials mentioned in Table A.2 and Table A.3. b What are the acceptable pH and Cl - limits c Does A.2.2.3.3 cover L80 type 1 d For low-alloy steels described in Section A.2 of this standard what are the cases where injection of corrosion inhibitors are required both for downhole casings/tubing and surface pipelines https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: aThis is correct. bNo limits of pH and Cl- have been formally defined for carbon and low-alloy steels. Any combinations of chloride concentration and in situ pH occurring in production environments are considered acceptable. Metal loss corrosion which can be influenced by both pH and chlorides is not the subject of the standard. cNo this grade is covered in Paragraphs A.2.2.3.1 and A.2.2.3.4. dNACE MR0175/ISO 15156 does not cover the use of corrosion inhibitors. The use of any kind of corrosion inhibitor is not considered to allow any relaxation of the requirements for cracking resistance of materials in sour service. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.1.2 A.2.2.3.3 Table A.2 and Table A.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2005-14 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 22. in NACE MR0175 what Types in Table A.12 cover UNS N08825 Question: in NACE MR0175 what Types in Table A.12 cover UNS N08825 Answer: UNS N08825 meets type 4a and 4c in Table A.12. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 Table A.12 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.12 — Materials types of solid-solution nickel-based alloys https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 23. In NACE MR0175 is GHSC a qualification or production requirement Question: Can you confirm our company’s interpretation of the testing described in ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3:2009 Annex B Section B.8 Our interpretation is that the GHSC testing described in B.8 is for qualification of CRA’s for H2S-service by laboratory testing this testing in B.8 is qualification testing for including the CRA in the standard and it is not intended to be routine/quality control testing that must be performed on every heat of CRA that is produced at a mill. Answer: Section B.8 defines the additional requirements/changes to SSC testing for GHSC testing. There is no implied limitation on the application of these tests. The type of tests and the frequency of “periodic” testing to confirm the resistance to cracking for quality control purposes is not defined in ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 and these tests if required shall be agreed between the manufacturer and the purchaser. The subject of production route qualification is covered in Section B.2.3 “Qualification of a defined production route”. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Annex B B.8 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang B.8 GHSC testing with carbon steel couple GHSC tests shall be performed in accordance with the previously stated requirements for SSC testing subject to the following additional requirements options and clarifications: a. the CRA specimen shall be electrically coupled to unalloyed i.e. carbon steel that is fully immersed in the test solution. The ratio of the area of the unalloyed steel to the wetted area of the CRA specimen shall be between 05 and 1 as required by NACE TM0177. Loading fixtures shall be electrically isolated from the specimen and the coupled steel. For application-specific qualifications the CRA may be coupled to a sample of the lower alloyed material to which it will be coupled in service. b. the test environment shall be NACE TM0177 Solution A under H2S at a pressure of 100 kPa and at a temperature of 24 ± 3 °C 75 ± 5 °F. For application-specific qualifications SSC test environments described in B.3.5 may be used. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The type of tests and the frequency of “periodic” testing to confirm the resistance to cracking for quality control purposes is not defined in ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 25. In NACE MR0175 Table A.22 are martensitic stainless steels "limitless" Do they need qualifying Question: In NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 -3 Table A.22 lists the "Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as compressor components." The maximum partial pressure requirement for H2S directs you to see Remarks and the Remarks state "Any combination of temperature partial pressure of H2S chloride concentration and in situ pH occurring in production environments are acceptable." Does this remark indicate that conformance to the NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 is required for any amount of H2S I am looking for clarification as to what "acceptable conditions" is referring to. As a centrifugal compressor manufacturer we often build compressors for process gases which are a hydrocarbon mix containing a few parts per million or trace amounts of H2S. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer Conformance to the Standard is required for any trace amount of H2S. In the case of Table A.22 the listed martensitic stainless steels can be used in any production environment provided they are in conformance with the metallurgical requirements indicated in the lower part of the Table. Note that item c in Table A.22 requires a resistance in the anticipated service environment of at least 95 of the actual yield strength of the impeller material using Annex B for laboratory testing. Qualification requirements to ISO 15156 are listed in §8 of NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.6.2 T able 22 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2010-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.22 — Environmental and materials limits for martensitic stainless steels used as compressor components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang For these applications these materials shall also comply with the following: a cast or wrought alloys UNS S41000 J91150 CA15 and J91151 CA15M shall have 22 HRC maximum hardness if used for compressor components and shall be: 1. austenitized and quenched or air-cooled 2. tempered at 621 °C 1 150 °F minimum then cooled to ambient temperature 3. tempered at 621 °C 1 150 °F minimum but lower than the first tempering temperature then cooled to ambient temperature. b low-carbon martensitic stainless steels either cast J91540 CA6NM or wrought S42400 or S41500 F6NM shall have a maximum hardness of 23 HRC and shall be: 1 austenitized at 1 010 °C 1 850 °F minimum then air- or oil-quenched to ambient temperature 2 tempered at 649 °C to 690 °C 1 200 °F to 1 275 °F then air-cooled to ambient temperature 3 tempered at 593 °C to 621 °C 1 100 °F to 1 150 °F then air-cooled to ambient temperature. c if used for impellers cast or wrought alloys UNS S41000 J91150 CA15 and J91151 CA15M cast J91540 CA6NM and wrought S42400 or S41500 F6NM shall exhibit a threshold stress ≥95 of actual yield strength in the anticipated service environment. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang c if used for impellers cast or wrought alloys UNS S41000 J91150 CA15 and J91151 CA15M cast J91540 CA6NM and wrought S42400 or S41500 F6NM shall exhibit a threshold stress ≥95 of actual yield strength in the anticipated service environment. Note that item c in Table A.22 requires a resistance in the anticipated service environment of at least 95 of the actual yield strength of the impeller material using Annex B for laboratory testing. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 26. In NACE MR0175 is UNS N08825 resistant to sulfur without limitations on pH temperature pH2S and chloride Question: Is UNS N08825 resistant to sulfur without limitations on pH temperature pH2S and chloride In the remarks column in Table A.13 the following is stated: “…some combinations of the values of these parameters might not be acceptable”. How should this be interpreted Answer: Table A.14 currently states that Type 4c alloys including UNS N08825 are resistant to sulfur under any combination of conditions up to and including 132°C 270°F. Note that recent discussions in the Maintenance Panel have highlighted that the term “sulfur resistant” is not adequate conservative in itself and there is activity currently underway defining levels of resistance that are determined through three different test techniques and resultant 3 groups 1 where successful tests were conducted using 1 g/l dissolved sulfur 2 where there is direct exposure to solid sulfur – applicable below 110°C and 3 direct exposure to liquid sulfur – applicable for temperatures above 110°C. The user is cautioned that even though there are no environmental limits currently defined below 132°C for UNS N08825 there could be some combinations of parameters including elemental sulfur form i.e. physically dissolved solid or liquid that may not be acceptable. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.4 T able A.12 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-08 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.12 — Materials types of solid-solution nickel-based alloys https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Type Grouping of N08825 4a/4c https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.13 — Environmental and materials limits for solid-solution nickel-based alloys used in any equipment or component Annealed alloys of types 4a and 4b https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.14 — Environmental and materials limits for annealed and cold-worked solid-solution nickel-based alloys used as any equipment or component a Coldworked alloys of types 4c 4d and 4e https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 27. What is the minimum partial pressure of H2S that requires compliance with NACE MR0175 ANSI/NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 indicates that in production conditions with partial pressure of H 2 S ppH2S below 0.3kPa 0.05psi no special precautions are required for carbon and low alloy steels. However highly susceptible carbon and low alloy steels high strength heavily cold worked etc can still be susceptible to H 2 S related damage mechanisms even at ppH2S below these limits. For corrosion resistant alloys CRAs there is now ppH 2 S low limit which means precautions need to be taken whenever the possibility of H 2 S is present. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang For corrosion resistant alloys CRAs there is now ppH 2 S low limit which means precautions need to be taken whenever the possibility of H 2 S is present. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156-2 Para 7.1.2 says "If the partial pressure of H2S in the gas is equal to or greater than 0.3kPa 0.05psi SSC-resistant steels shall be selected using A.2" Could I please get clarification regarding the sour service H2S partial pressure cut-off value as NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 use both imperial and metric units. The conversion of 0.05 psi is 0.345 kPa. Please clarify if the H2S pp cut-off for sour service is 0.3 kPa or 0.345 kPa conversion from 0.05 psi. Answer: The value was rounded off when converting from 0.05 psi. This limit is actually not a very sharp and accurate value and this is why 03 kPa value was taken as a practical engineering value. Note however that even below this H2S partial pressure some materials can be susceptible to SSC as stated in 7.1.1. This means that in principle there is no cut-off value for sour service. It is just that below this value only particularly sensitive steels can be susceptible to SSC. It is up to the user to make sure that the steel used is resistant below 0.05 psi 0.3 kPa. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Clause 7.1.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2009-18 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 28. According to NACE MR0175 can UNS S20910 be used for choke valve stems as well as valve stems Question: Can UNS S20910 be used in the condition specified in table A.3 for choke valve stems as well as valve stems Answer: Yes table A.3 includes choke valve stems since chokes are considered to be a type of valve in the Oil Gas Industry. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 A.3 T able A.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 30. Why does NACE MR0175 list S31600 and S31603 separately in part 3 Table A.2 Question: Q1: Table A.2 lists material types and individual alloy UNS numbers. UNS S31600 and S31603 appear below the listing for ""Austenitic stainless steel from materials type described in A.2"" S31600 and S31603 comply with the requirements for material described in A.2 Why are S31600 and S31603 listed separately from the other austenitic stainless steels Q2:Do S31600 and S31603 have different environmental limitations than other austenitic stainless steels Answer A1-Clause A.2 materials permit less highly alloyed grades than S31600 and S31603. A2-Yes This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2013-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 31. What are the NACE MR0175 requirements for expansion joints and flexible hoses in austenitic stainless steel Question: Were a manufacturer of expansion joints and flexible hoses and since we get more and more often inquiries regarding bellow according to MR0175 we purchased a copy of this standard some time ago. Since our bellows standard material is austenitic stainless steel we paid particular attention to Table A.2 attached where there some notes about cold work and maximum hardness. Our understanding of these notes is that to meet this particular requirement we have to perform a heat treatment of the bellows after cold forming and to check the maximum hardness to be not higher than 22 HRC. Could you please tell me if our understanding is correct or what is the right method to follow to satisfy the requirements of MR0175 when the subject is cold formed bellows https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: Table A.2 is applicable to austenitic stainless steels used for ANY components. There may be other applicable tables depending on the end use of the bellows e.g. Table A.7 for gas lift service. If Table A.2 is the applicable table the requirements for material conditions hardness limit and cold forming are stated in A.2. The MP is restricted to providing interpretations of the standard’s requirements and may not provide direction beyond this scope. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.2 cold work Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2012-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.2 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components Table A.7 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used in gas lift service and for special components for subsurface applications such as downhole screens control-line tubing hardware e.g. set screws etc. injection tubing and injection equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Expansion Bellow

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Expansion Bellow

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.2 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.7 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used in gas lift service and for special components for subsurface applications such as downhole screens control-line tubing hardware e.g. set screws etc. injection tubing and injection equipment https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 32. Does NACE MR0175 allows UNS S20910 to be used in the hot rolled or solution annealed and hot rolled condition Question: see above Answer: UNS S20910 can be used for the applications in Table A.3 in the hot rolled or solution annealed and hot rolled conditions as long as the hardness does not exceed 35 HRC. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2015-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 33. What are the NACE MR0175 limits for Nitronic 50 UNS S20910 Question: Our customer does not understand the NACE the same way as we do regarding the use of Nitronic 50 "hot worked" when applying Table A.3 see document attached. It is only a matter of interpretation of the NACE and we are convinced that on the contrary Nitronic 50 should be used "hot worked" and can be used "cold worked" if preceded by an annealed treatment. The only way to convince them that they can use Nitronic 50 hot worked for their application would be if we have someone from NACE who would certify that our interpretation above is correct. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: The following interpretation can be given for use of UNS S20910: “The note in Table A.3 permits the use of UNS S20910 in the solution annealed and cold worked condition provided that the hardness does not exceed 35 HRC. The solution annealed condition is also acceptable. Also refer to Table A.2 which permits use of listed materials for any equipment or components. This Table contains the following note “S20910 is acceptable in the annealed or hot rolled hot/cold worked condition at a maximum hardness of 35 HRC”. If your question is of whether UNS S20910 is acceptable in hot worked conditions for the limits listed in Table A.3 we would ask you to re-phrase your inquiry to specifically ask for this. The standard is not using expressions such as “should be used” or “can be used” for limits given in the tables. Note that the answer to this is not clearly given in the standard and we will need some time to discuss the answer to this with the Maintenance Panel for the ISO 15156 / NACE MR0175. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-09 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 40. According to NACE MR0175 what is a Corrosion Resistant Alloy What is a Corrosion Resistant Alloy Question: I need your help with the definition of CRAs in Part 3 of MR0175/ISO 15156. The "corrosion-resistant alloys" is very general and does not specify whether or not the definition includes the Fe-based alloys or not. More than that the term CRA is used together with "other alloys" making it even more confusing. Answer: NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-1 Paragraph 3.6 contains a definition of "corrosion-resistant alloy" CRA. It reads: "alloy intended to be resistant to general and localized corrosion of oilfield environments that are corrosive to carbon steel." This is taken from EFC 17. "Other Alloys" are those not covered by the definitions of carbon steel or CRA. For example copper is not considered resistant to general corrosion but is considered in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2004-12 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 41. What is NACE MR0175 test position for cold worked austenitic stainless steels e.g. 304 316 and 316L Question: Our company has understood that NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 Table A.2 required the maximum specified hardness for austenitic stainless steels be satisfied at any location on bar stock e.g. at locations considered significant by the user. Since cold-finished bars frequently have surface hardness values above the maximum specified in MR0175 we have declined to certify these products as compliant to the specification. We appear to be in the minority or perhaps the only stainless bar producer that interprets the standard in this way. We routinely find competitors cold-finished stainless bar in the marketplace certified to MR0175 based on a mid-radius hardness even though the surface hardness is above the maximum permitted in the standard. We realize this is a long-standing issue but would like to clarify the hardness requirements of the Table A.2. We understand the logic in requiring the material meet a hardness maximum at any location e.g. surface in order to provide a predictable level of stress corrosion cracking resistance. Yet the standard does not clearly state for example that meeting surface hardness is a requirement. Please clarify the hardness requirements of MR0175 to allow all stainless bar producers to provide a uniform product to this standard https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: NACE cannot provide assistance in specifying where to take hardness impressions and readings for this alloy or for any other alloy. This is because NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 is not a quality assurance document. It is the responsibility of the alloy supplier to meet the hardness requirements and metallurgical requirements of the austenitic stainless steels in Table A.2. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 6.2.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2003-06 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.2 Evaluation of materials properties 6.2.1 Hardness of parent metals If hardness measurements on parent metal are specified sufficient hardness tests shall be made to establish the actual hardness of the CRA or other alloy being examined. Individual HRC readings exceeding the value permitted by this part of ISO 15156 may be considered acceptable if the average of several readings taken within close proximity does not exceed the value permitted by this part of ISO 15156 and no individual reading is greater than 2 HRC above the specified value. Equivalent requirements shall apply to other methods of hardness measurement when specified in this part of ISO 15156 or referenced in a manufacturing specification. The conversion of hardness readings to or from other scales is material- dependent. The user may establish the required conversion tables. NOTE The number and location of hardness tests on parent metal are not specified in ISO 15156 all parts. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang At the Surface https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang At the mid-Surface https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 42. Do NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 7.3.2 “Parent metals” and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 “Hardness of parent metals” apply to machined forgings or are they meant to be applied to weldment parent metals only Question: Do NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 7.3.2 “Parent metals” and NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 “Hardness of parent metals” apply to machined forgings or are they meant to be applied to weldment parent metals only Answer: The requirements listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-2 Section 7.3.2 apply to the parent materials applicable to part 2 carbon and low alloy steels and cast irons. The parent materials include forgings. See also sections A.2.1.2 and A.2.1.3 of Annex A for additional requirements. The requirements listed in NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Section 6.2.1 apply to parent materials applicable to part 2 CRAs and other alloys. The parent materials include forgings This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 6.2.1 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-03 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 43. In NACE MR0175 are austenitic and duplex stainless steels acceptable "as welded" or do they need PWHT Question: For the cast austenitic and duplex stainless steels there is no specific mention of a requirement for post weld heat treatment in Part 3 that discusses welding of these alloys. However there is a statement in the application of these alloys that they are only acceptable in the solution annealed and quench condition. In my opinion the as welded condition does not meet the intent of being solution annealed and quenched. So can these alloys be used in the as welded condition Answer: These alloys can be used in the as welded condition provided they meet the requirements of Paragraph 6.2 of ISO 15156-3 and the corresponding Tables in Annex A. In particular Paragraph 6.2.2 indicates that welding PQRs shall include documented evidence of satisfactory cracking resistance. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 6.2.2 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.2.2 Cracking-resistance properties of welds 6.2.2.1 General The metallurgical changes that occur when welding CRAs and other alloys can affect their susceptibility to SSC SCC and/or GHSC. Welded joints can have a greater susceptibility to cracking than the parent materials joined. The equipment user may allow the cracking susceptibility of weldments to govern the limits of safe service conditions for a fabricated system. Processes and consumables used in welding should be selected in accordance with good practice and to achieve the required corrosion and cracking resistances. Welding shall be carried out in compliance with appropriate codes and standards as agreed between the supplier and the purchaser. Welding procedure specifications WPSs and procedure qualification records PQRs shall be available for inspection by the equipment user. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Welding PQRs shall include documented evidence demonstrating satisfactory cracking resistance under conditions at least as severe as those of the proposed application. Such evidence shall be based upon one or more of the following: 1. compliance with the requirements and recommendations for the specific materials group of Annex A see also 6.2.2.2 and 6.2.2.3 2. weld cracking-resistance qualification testing in accordance with Annex B 3. documented field experience modelled upon that specified for parent materials in ISO 15156-1. the three mighty The requirements and recommendations given in Annex A might not be appropriate for all combinations of parent and weld metals used in the fabrication of equipment and components. The equipment user may require evidence of successful cracking-resistance testing as part of the welding procedure qualification to ensure the weldment produced provides adequate resistance to SSC SCC and GHSC for the application. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Three Mighty: 1 Annex A 2 Annex B and the 3 Field Experiences https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang https://iconreader.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/icon-of-the-three-holy-hierarchs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Favorite https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 44. According to NACE MR0175 What are the hardness requirements and what hardness method should be used Cautions: 1. ⊗ 22HRC is not the only NACE MR0175 requirement see this link 2. ⊗ 22HRC applies for some carbon and low alloy steels but 22HRC is not the hardness limit for all materials. 3. ⊗ The conversion of hardness readings to and from other scales is material dependent there are hardness conversion tables such as ASTM E140 ISO 18265 . As per NACE MR0175 the user may establish the required conversion tables. Specifically for CA6NM and F6NM the hardness requirements are listed in NACE MR0175 part 3 clause A.6. The hardness limits are listed in Hardness Rockwell scale C HRC. However for welding purposes HV10 or HV5 is required and currently there is no conversion from HRC to HV10 in the published references. The conversion must be agreed between manufacturer and equipment user. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question: Per A.6.3 "The hardness of the HAZ after welding shall not exceed the maximum hardness allowed for the base metal and the hardness of the weld metal shall not exceed the maximum hardness limit of the respective alloy used for the welding consumable." Per Table A.23 note b "Low-carbon Martensitic stainless steels either cast J91540 CA6NM or wrought S42400 or S41500 F6NM shall have 23 HRC maximum hardness..." Per 6.2.2.2.2 "Hardness testing for welding procedure qualification shall be carried out using Vickers HV 10 or HV 5 methods in accordance with ISO 6507-1 or the Rockwell 15N method in accordance with ISO 6508-1. The use of other methods shall require explicit user approval." However neither a Vickers nor Rockwell 15N acceptance criteria is specified for Martensitic Stainless Steels. Furthermore ASTM E140 does not provide a hardness conversion for Martensitic Stainless Steels. Thus there is neither a Vickers nor Rockwell 15N acceptance criteria. Is a correct interpretation that the acceptable hardness test method for qualification of Martensitic Stainless Steels is the Rockwell C Method regardless of the applied stress and without the need for explicit user approval https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Answer: No ISO 15156-3 6.2.1 Para. 2 states "The conversion of hardness readings to and from other scales is material dependent the user may establish the required conversion tables". This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 6.2.2.2.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2006-01Q3 There is an API committee currently working in preparing a conversion table for martensitic stainless steel duplex stainless steels and nickel alloys. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Designation: E140 − 12b Standard Hardness Conversion Tables for Metals Relationship Among Brinell Hardness Vickers Hardness Rockwell Hardness Superficial Hardness Knoop Hardness Scleroscope Hardness and Leeb Hardness https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5. Principle of Method of Conversion 5.1 Tests have proved that even the most reliable data cannot be fitted to a single conversion relationship for all metals. Indentation hardness is not a single fundamental property but a combination of properties and the contribution of each to the hardness number varies with the type of test. The modulus of elasticity has been shown to influence conversions at high hardness levels and at low hardness levels conversions between hardness scales measuring depth and those measuring diameter are likewise influenced by differences in the modulus of elasticity. Therefore separate conversion tables are necessary for different materials. 6. Significance and Use 6.1 The conversion values given in the tables or calculated by the equations given in the appendixes should only be considered valid for the specific materials indicated. This is because conversions can be affected by several factors including the material alloy grain structure heat treatment etc. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 45. What are the NACE MR0175 traceability requirements Question: Following ISO 15156-3 Section 7.2 Marking labeling and documentation it is indicated that material complying with ISO 15156 shall be made traceable. This section confirms that suitable documentation can ensure acceptable traceability without listing the documentation required. Could you please clarify what are the documents required to ensure acceptable traceability of material complying with ISO 15156 Answer: Required documents to ensure acceptable traceability shall be agreed with the equipment user. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Clause 7.2 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-10 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ISO 15156-1:2009E 9 Report of the method of selection or qualification Materials selected or qualified in accordance with this part of ISO 15156 shall have the method of selection documented by reporting item a from the following list together with one other item b c or d: https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 46. In NACE MR0175 is UNS S20910 acceptable in hot worked conditions Question: In NACE MR0175 is UNS S20910 acceptable in hot worked conditions Answer: The Table A.3 permits cold working to 35 HRC as long as the material has a solution annealing cycle that precedes it. The UNS S20910 is acceptable per the applications of Table A.3 in the hot worked condition that is subsequently solution annealed and cold worked to 35 HRC. The UNS S20910 is acceptable per the applications of Table A.3 in the hot worked condition as long as it is free of cold work intended to enhance mechanical properties and has a maximum hardness of 35 HRC. The condition of UNS S20910 in the hot worked condition followed only by cold working that enhances mechanical properties is not addressed in Table A.3 changing Table A.3 to permit this condition would require a successful ballot. This question is in relation to NACE MR0175/ISO 15156-3 Table A.3 Reference: ISO 15156 Maintenance Panel Inquiry 2014-09R https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table D.1 — Chemical compositions of some austenitic stainless steels see A.2 and D.3 https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.2 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used for any equipment or components https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ UNS S20910 is acceptable for environments inside the limits imposed for the material type and for this alloy specifically in the annealed or hot-rolled hot/cold-worked condition at a maximum hardness of 35 HRC.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Table A.3 — Environmental and materials limits for austenitic stainless steels used as valve stems pins and shafts https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang UNS S20910 at a maximum hardness level of 35HRC may be used in the cold-worked condition provided this cold working is preceded by solution annealing. It means The UNS S20910 is acceptable per the applications of Table A.3 in the hot worked condition that is subsequently solution annealed and cold worked to 35 HRC. The UNS S20910 is acceptable per the applications of Table A.3 in the hot worked condition that is subsequently solution annealed and cold worked to 35 HRC maximum. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang S20910 conditions A2:  Product in solution anneal or hot-rolled hot/cold-worked non-anneal condition  Cold work is allows as long as  Final product maximum hardness 35HRC https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/ Heat treatment condition is not specific however the maximum hardness is controlled for the A2 specific environment application.

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang S20910 conditions A3:  Product in solution anneal condition Hot work follow by solution anneal  Cold work is allows as long as  Final product maximum hardness 35HRC https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 47. What is the difference between NACE MR0175 and ISO 15156 Question: What is the difference between NACE MR0175 and ISO 15156 Answer: There is no technical difference. The documents are identical NACE MR0175 and ISO 15156 is the same document and it is written and maintained by the same committee. ISO 15156 is the document number adopted by ISO while NACE MR0175 is the document number used by NACE ANSI NACE MR0175 is the official document number within the US. In the UK the document is BS EN ISO 15156. In terms of the technical requirements and the information presented by this document there is no difference among them they are identical. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 48. Who is in charge of NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 The document is maintained by a maintenance panel the role of the Maintenance Panel is solely to ensure that NACE MR0175/ ISO 15156 is clear in its stated requirements and is kept up-to- date. You can find more information in the ISO website www.iso.org/iso15156maintenance Since 2007 NACE MR0175 / ISO 15156 is a document updated by an ISO dedicated Maintenance Agency that has established 3 groups of experts for the process of reviewing and updating this standard. The first group is the Maintenance Panel formed by 15 experts the Maintenance Panel reviews the document and proposes any changes. Proposed changes are reviewed and balloted by the TG299 Oversight Committee second group. If approved changes are confirmed by ISO TC67 WG7 third group and incorporated into the document for publication in the next revision. Each country then incorporates the document as a national standard through their national committees and standardization bodies. Information regarding this process can be found in the ISO website. The role of the Maintenance Panel is solely to ensure that NACE MR0175/ ISO 15156 is clear in its stated requirements and is kept up-to-date. You can find more information in the ISO website www.iso.org/iso15156maintenance Some of the questions in this section are inquiries and clarifications submitted to the maintenance panel. References are used where appropriate. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 49. Is 22HRC the only requirement to meet NACE MR0175 Question: Is 22HRC the only requirement to meet NACE MR0175 Answer: No a maximum hardness of 22 HRC is one of the requirements for carbon steel and low alloy steels. But this is not the only requirement. In this video Ivan Gutierrez Managing Director of Oil Gas Corrosion discusses what other requirements need to be fulfilled to meet NACE MR0175. Carbon and low alloy steels must meet requirements of chemical composition heat treatment and HIC resistance to fulfil the NACE MR0175 requirements. The risk of HIC and other cracking mechanisms needs to assessed. Stainless steels and other Corrosion Resistant Alloys CRAs have additional requirements. Furthermore for each type of CRA different applications may have different requirements e.g. downhole components requirements may be different to valves and pipeline material. https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 50. If a product doesn’t meet NACE MR0175 how long will it take before it fails At Oil Gas Corrosion we frequently receive this question "If a product doesn’t meet NACE MR0175 how long will it take before it fails" our answer to this is always the same. We need to assume that it will be an immediate catastrophic failure. Furthermore you must remember that H2S is fatal in very low concentrations therefore an uncontrolled release can lead to sudden death of anyone in range. Read more about the dangers of H2S in this article https://oilandgascorrosion.com/faqs/

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Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

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