API 1169-Full

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

Recommended practice for basic inspection requirements – new pipeline construction API RP

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

Recommended practice for basic inspection requirements – new pipeline construction API RP 2014-September My Self Study Exam Preparatory Notes- Part 1 Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Fion Zhang 2014/September http://meilishouxihu.blog.163.com/ Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Contents: 1 Scope 2 Normative References 3 Terms, Definitions, and Abbreviations 3.1 Terms and Definitions 3.2 Abbreviations Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4 Pipeline Construction Inspector Responsibilities 4.1 Scope 4.2 Owner/Operator Representative 4.3 Quality Assurance 4.4 Relationship with Contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors. 4.5 Planning Activities 4.6 Authority to Stop Work 4.7 Reporting 4.8 Documentation 4.9 Public Relations 4.10 Media Relations 4.11 Safety 4.12 Work Ethics Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5 Personnel and General Pipeline Safety Requirements 5.1 Scope 5.2 Job Safety Analysis (JSA) 5.3 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 5.4 Loss Prevention Systems 5.5 Protective Measures for Radiation 5.6 Job Site and Facility Security 5.7 Required Work Permits 5.8 Rigging and Lifting Safety 5.9 Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources 5.10 Excavation, Trenching, and Boring Safety Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.11 Confined Space Entry Requirements 5.12 Atmospheric Testing 5.13 Respiratory Protection 5.14 Fall Prevention and Protective Systems 5.15 Scaffolding and Ladders 5.16 Use, Movement, Storage, and Inspection of Tools, Equipment, and Materials 5.17 Facility, Commissioning, and Pre-start-up Review 5.18 Regulatory Agency Inspections 5.19 Vehicle Operation Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

6 Environmental and Pollution Control Requirements 6.1 Scope 6.2 Erosion, Sediment, and Runoff Control on the Pipeline ROW 6.3 Federal, State, and Typical Local Environmental Permits 6.4 Major Statutes 6.5 Water Crossing Permits 6.6 Use of Natural Water Sources 6.7 Handling Contamination Issues Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

7 General Pipeline Construction Requirements 7.1 Scope 7.2 Verification of Construction Personnel Qualifications 7.3 ROW Inspection Requirements 7.4 Locating and Marking Requirements 7.5 ROW Preparation Requirements 7.6 Ditching and Excavation Requirements 7.7 Pipe Handling, Hauling, and Stringing Operations 7.8 Piping Components, Materials, and Other Mainline Appurtenances 7.9 Pipe Bending Operations 7.10 Pipe Alignment and Welding Requirements Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

7.11 Roadway, Railroad, and Other Crossings 7.12 Waterway and Water Body Crossings 7.13 Corrosion Control Requirements 7.14 Lowering in Requirements 7.15 Backfill and Cleanup Requirements 7.16 Pipeline Cleaning Requirements 7.17 Internal Line Inspection Requirements 7.18 Hydrostatic Pressure Testing Requirements 7.19 Commissioning Requirements 7.20 Documentation Requirements 7.21 Inspector Tools for Communication and Documentation Requirements Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Annex A (normative) Chief Inspector Annex B (normative) Blasting Inspector Annex C (normative) Horizontal Directional Drilling Inspector Annex D (normative) Welding Inspector Annex E (normative) Corrosion Control Inspector Bibliography Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

At works Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

At works Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Others Reading: http://huckbody.com/?page_id=1088

PowerPoint Presentation:

Recommended Practice for Basic Inspection Requirements - New Pipeline Construction Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

1 Scope This recommended practice (RP) covers the basic requirements and their associated references needed to perform inspection activities safely and effectively during construction of new onshore pipelines. Use of this document will provide the basis for what construction inspectors need to have a basic knowledge of and where to find detailed information related to each facet of new pipeline construction inspection activities. The requirements are organized into the following major sections: ■ inspector responsibilities, ■ personnel and general pipeline safety, ■ environmental and pollution control, ■ general pipeline construction inspection. Users of this document include those individuals either engaged in pipeline construction inspection or seeking to become certified inspectors. Pipeline owner/operators and pipeline inspection service companies may also use this document to aid and enhance their inspector training programs. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Possible Question: Who are the individual (s) used this document? Answer: Users of this document include; The Inspectors’ Guide: those individuals either engaged in pipeline construction inspection or Individuals seeking to become certified inspectors. The Inspection Training Programs: Pipeline owner/operators and pipeline inspection service companies may also use this document to aid and enhance their inspector training programs. My Questions? - The Contractor Pipeline Inspector? Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Applicability of this RP – New Onshore Pipeline This recommended practice (RP) covers the basic requirements and their associated references needed to perform inspection activities safely and effectively during construction of new onshore pipelines. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Offshore Subsea Pipeline – Not within scope of this document Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Offshore Subsea Pipeline – Not within scope of this document Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Offshore Subsea Pipeline – Not within scope of this document Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Offshore Subsea Pipeline – Not within scope of this document Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shore Pull to Metering Stations Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shore Pull to Pipeline Metering Stations Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jetty & Loading Terminal Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jetty & Loading Terminal Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jetty & Loading Terminal Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jetty & Loading Terminal Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jetty & Loading Terminal Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Truck & Loading Terminal Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Offshore Pipeline Metering Stations Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Onshore Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Onshore Pipeline- Tropical Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Onshore Pipeline- Temperate Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Onshore Pipeline- ROW Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Onshore Pipeline - ROW Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

2 Normative References The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies. API Specification 5L, Specification for Line Pipe API Recommended Practice 5L1, Recommended Practice for Railroad Transportation of Line Pipe API Recommended Practice 5LT, Recommended Practice for Truck Transportation of Line Pipe API Recommended Practice 5LW, Recommended Practice for Transportation of Line Pipe on Barges and Marine Vessels API Specification 6D, Specification for Pipeline Valves Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Standard 1104, Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities API Recommended Practice 1109, Marking Liquid Petroleum Pipeline Facilities API Recommended Practice 1110, Pressure Testing of Steel Pipelines for the Transportation of Gas, Petroleum Gas, Hazardous Liquids, Highly Volatile Liquids or Carbon Dioxide Options for Liquid Pipeline Systems API Recommended Practice 1166, Excavation Monitoring and Observation Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Standard 1104 - Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 5LT - Recommended Practice for Truck Transportation of Line Pipe Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 5LW - Recommended Practice for Transportation of Line Pipe on Barges and Marine Vessels Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Specification 6D - Specification for Pipeline Valves Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Standard 1104 - Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Standard 1104 - Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Standard 1104 - Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities Offshore Welding Barge Welding Stations Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 1110 - Hydrostatic Testing of Pipeline Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 1109 – Pipe Markings Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 1109 – Pipe Markings Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 5L1- Recommended Practice for Railroad Transportation of Line Pipe Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 5L1- Recommended Practice for Railroad Transportation of Line Pipe Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 5L1- Recommended Practice for Railroad Transportation of Line Pipe Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 5L1- Recommended Practice for Railroad Transportation of Line Pipe Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 1110 - Hydrotesting by Sections Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 1110 - Hydrotesting by Sections Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Practice 1166 - Excavation Monitoring and Observation Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommend ed Practice 1166 - Excavation Monitoring and Observation Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

API Recommended Pra ctice 1166 - Excavation Monitoring a nd Observation Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

ANSI B16.5, Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings ANSI B16.9, Factory-made Steel Butt welding Fittings ANSI B16.20, Metallic Gaskets for Pipe Flanges ANSI B16.21, Nonmetallic Gaskets for Pipe Flanges ANSI B16.47, Large Diameter Steel Flanges ASME B31.3, Process Piping ASME B31.4, Pipeline Transportation Systems for Liquids and Slurries, 2012 ASME B31.8, Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping Systems, 2012 ANSI/ASNT SNT-TC-1A 2, Personnel Qualification and Certification for Nondestructive Testing Personnel Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

CGA 4 , Best Practices, 2013 NACE RP0169-06 5 , Control of Corrosion in Underground or Submerged Metallic Pipeline Systems NFPA 30 6 , Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code OSHA Title 29, CFR Part 1910 7 , Occupational Safety and Health Standards OSHA Title 29 CFR Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction Peabody, A. W., Control of Pipeline Corrosion, National Association of Corrosion, Second Edition, January 2001 SSPC 8 , Good Painting Practices, Volume 1 Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

U.S. DOT Title 49, CFR Part 177 9 , Carriage by Public Highway U.S. DOT Title 49, CFR Part 192, Transportation of Natural and Other Gas by Pipeline U.S. DOT Title 49, CFR Part 195, Transportation of Hazardous Liquids by Pipeline U.S. DOT Title 49, CFR Part 199, Drug and Alcohol Testing Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 49 CFR - Transportation http://www.49cfr.info/index.html http://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/49

PowerPoint Presentation:

American National Standards Institute, 25 West 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, New York 10036, www.ansi.org. American Society for Nondestructive Testing, 1711 Arlingate Lane, P.O. Box 28518, Columbus, Ohio 43228, www.asnt.org. ASME International, 3 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10016-5990, www.asme.org. Common Ground Alliance, 2300 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 400, Arlington, Virginia 22201, www.commongroundalliance.com. NACE International (formerly the National Association of Corrosion Engineers), 1440 South Creek Drive, Houston, Texas 77218-8340, www.nace.org. National Fire Protection Association, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169-7471, www.nfpa.org. U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210, www.osha.gov. The Society for Protective Coatings, 40 24th Street, Sixth Floor, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 15222, www.sspc.org. U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20590, www.dot.gov. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Battery Limits – Extents and coverage of the codes & standards (Non-Exam) ASME B31.3, Process Piping Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Fig. 300.1.1 Diagram Illustrating Application of B31.3 Piping at Equipment - GENERAL NOTE: The means by which piping is attached to equipment is within the scope of the applicable piping code. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Battery Limits – Extents and coverage of the codes & standards (Non-Exam) ASME B31.4, Pipeline Transportation Systems for Liquids and Slurries, 2012 Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Fig. 400.1.1-1 Diagram Showing Scope of ASME B31.4 Excluding Carbon Dioxide Pipeline Systems (See Fig. 400.1.1-2) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Battery Limits – Extents and coverage of the codes & standards (Non-Exam) ASME B31.8, Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping Systems, 2012 Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Fig. Q-1 Scope of ASME B31.8 Transmission Piping offshore GENERAL NOTE: Facilities and piping indicated by solid lines are within the scope of ASME B31.8. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

3 Terms, Definitions, and Abbreviations For the purposes of this document, the following definitions apply. 3.1 Terms and Definitions 3.1.1 contractor An entity that includes the primary organization and any subcontractors engaged in pipeline construction covered by this RP. 3.1.2 inspector An individual qualified to monitor, assess, evaluate, verify, discuss, decide, resolve, report, and document pipeline construction activities to ensure the requirements of the design, drawings, specifications, regulations, and industry practices are being met safely, efficiently, and in an environmentally sound manner. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

NOTE There may be numerous types of inspectors, such as utility, coating, welding, and chief inspectors with employment arrangements including owner/operator employees, inspection service company supplied inspectors, or freelance contract inspectors (see annexes for details on other inspector classifications). 3.1.3 owner/operator An entity, usually a pipeline company, who owns and/or operates and is responsible for pipeline or other utility assets. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

owner/operator - who owns and/or operates and is responsible for pipeline or other utility assets. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

3.2 Abbreviations For the purposes of this document, the following abbreviations apply: ACI American Concrete Institute BMP best management practices CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act CFR Code of Federal Regulations CP cathodic protection dbA decibels measured on A scale FWPCA Federal Water Pollution Control Act, aka Clean Water Act HAZCOM hazard communication HAZMAT hazardous material HDD horizontal directional drilling HVAC high voltage alternating current GPS global positioning system Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

IDLH immediately dangerous to life and health JSA job safety analysis LFL lower flammable limit LOTO lockout/tagout MARSEC Marine Security MOC management of change MSDS material safety data sheet NDE nondestructive examination NDT nondestructive testing NORM naturally occurring radioactive material NPDES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System OQ operator qualification PE professional engineer PEL permissible exposure limit PPE personal protective equipment Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ROW right-of-way RP recommended practice SCBA self-contained breathing apparatus SPCC spill prevention, control, and containment SWP3 storm water pollution prevention plans TWIC Transportation Worker Identification Card Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4 Pipeline Construction Inspector Responsibilities 4.1 Scope This section outlines the responsibilities, personal conduct, and job performance expectations for pipeline construction inspectors that enable them to effectively carry out their duties using the knowledge and skills covered in the following sections on inspector requirements. An inspector is an individual qualified to monitor, assess, evaluate, verify, discuss, decide, resolve, report, and document pipeline construction activities to ensure the requirements of the design, drawings, specifications, regulations, and industry practices are being met safely, efficiently, and in an environmentally sound manner. Inspector or inspection team authority is backed up by contractual provisions that state all work done, as well as material provided, shall be subject, at all times, to inspection by the company in charge of the project. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: Pipeline Construction Inspector Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.2 Owner/Operator Representative Inspectors are expected to function at all times as representatives of the pipeline company (or other entity) owning and/or managing the project. In most cases, the inspector works for or represents a pipeline company, where strict procedures and/or contract provisions are in place that spell out the expectations and obligations of the inspector’s performance. . Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.3 Quality Assurance Quality assurance includes those activities focused on providing confidence that quality requirements are consistently fulfilled. Inspectors are expected to be the principal means of assuring work and material quality during field construction. Early insistence that work is not to be performed without an inspector present strengthens quality assurance. Any questions that may arise regarding quality and acceptability of work, materials furnished, and services provided are decided upon by the inspector, inspection team, and/or owner/operator. Inspectors are required to reject work, materials, and services that do not meet the standards, contract terms, specifications, drawings, or other requirements of the project. Decisions by the inspector, inspection team, and/or owner/operator regarding quality, acceptability, and materials provided are final and conclusive. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: Entities that responsible for quality inspector, inspection team, and/or owner/operator Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Right of Rejection: Could be - The Inspector Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Right of Rejection: Could be - The Inspection team (members?) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Right of Rejection: Could be - The Owner/Operator Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.4 Relationship with Contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors Inspectors are expected to establish a professional business relationship with the contractor, suppliers, and vendors. These relationships should be based on interactions that are characterized by a reasonable, prudent, and forthright attitude and grounded in the highest degree of integrity. Inspectors must remember that contractors are to function as independent contractors with the power and authority to select the means, methods, and manner to perform the contracted work. Inspectors must respect this position and not direct nor supervise the contractor’s work. However, in some cases, inspectors are required to implement cost control measures. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

■ However, in some cases, inspectors are required to implement cost control measures. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Caliber: Inspectors are expected to…… reasonable, prudent, and forthright attitude and grounded in the highest degree of integrity. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.5 Planning Activities Inspectors should mutually plan upcoming tasks with their contractor counterparts and owner/operator representatives, which will aid in smoother job performance and work completion. This should solidify a team approach in tackling each day’s work and lessen the threat of potential problems. 4.6 Authority to Stop Work Inspectors are empowered and expected to shut down any work on the basis of, but not limited to, conditions, situations, or activities that have occurred, are occurring, or may occur that could result in: Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang imminent danger to any person, including contractor or owner/operator personnel; (Life & Safety!) imminent danger to owner/operator or other property or the environment; (Property & Environment!) substandard quality/work techniques that do not meet owner/operator specifications. (Quality!)

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.7 Reporting Inspectors are expected to report deficiencies, unsatisfactory work, thefts, vandalism, missing materials/property, or suspicious activities/occurrences and other concerns in a timely, complete, and accurate manner to the chief inspector (Annex A), project manager, or designated owner/operator personnel depending on the project team organization. 4.8 Documentation Inspectors should complete required documentation in a timely, concise, and accurate manner, including daily inspection reports, pipe tallies, red line drawing markups (showing physical changes) for as-built, extra work authorizations (if allowed by owner), and other reports/forms as directed in a format acceptable to the owner/operator. Keywords: Daily routine: (1) daily inspection reports, (2) pipe tallies Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: Red line drawing markups (showing physical changes) for as-built Comments: Q: What is Red line markup in commissioning of oil platform? Answer: Red Line mark-ups are when you take construction drawings and confirm them during installation and commissioning. Changes are marked in red. http://www.answers.com/Q/What_is_Red_line_markup_in_commissioning_of_oil_platform Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.9 Public Relations Landowners, residents, and the general public with whom the inspector comes in contact typically consider the inspector to be a representative of the company. In dealing with these individuals or groups, the inspector should always conform to owner/operator expectations. Unfavorable publicity from inappropriate behavior could reflect adversely on all parties involved in the construction of the pipeline. Each inspector should ensure that complaints, misunderstandings, and other concerns expressed by landowners, residents, and the public are reported to the appropriate owner/operator representative for investigation and resolution. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.10 Media Relations Inspection personnel do not interact with representatives of newspapers, TV, or other media seeking information, unless expressly allowed to do so by the owner/operator. Inquiries from the media should be received in an open, honest way but referred to project management, public relations staff, or others designated by the owner/operator to handle these situations. 4.11 Safety Each inspector is responsible for their personal safety and share responsibility for those personnel around them. Attentiveness, caution, and awareness of hazards (outlined in Section 5) should be a continuous and integral part of each inspector’s behavior. If required by the owner/operator, inspectors are expected to pass a standard drug/alcohol test (see 49 CFR 199) and a background check. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

4.12 Work Ethics Inspectors should be aware of owner/operator policies regarding work ethics and behavior and understand the consequences of taking part in any activity that would not withstand the scrutiny of pipeline owner/operator management or other observers due to the appearance of the activity. These activities include offers of gifts, entertainment, trips, excursions, etc. offered by contractors, vendors, or suppliers. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Excursions: Philippines Long Beach Lobster Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Excursions: Malaysia Roast Lamb Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Excursions: Malaysian Roasted Lamb Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Home treat: Barbecue ribs & sausages Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Excursions: Damingshan, Zhejiang China Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5 Personnel and General Pipeline Safety Requirements 5.1 Scope The requirements set forth in this section should be used to establish pipeline construction inspector knowledge and awareness of hazards inherent to new pipeline construction and the safety regulations, practices, and responses needed to address these hazards. This section highlights many of the basic OSHA requirements, specifically 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926, that apply to construction safety and general requirements that may go beyond those spelled out in the regulations. It is the duty of pipeline owner/operators and their contractors to be aware of, and comply with, all applicable federal, state, and local laws/regulations and manufacturer’s requirements that apply to specific work activities being performed and materials used. Inspectors must report any unacceptable practices. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.2 Job Safety Analysis (JSA) 5.2.1 General Job safety analysis (JSA) should be conducted per owner/operator requirements, and inspectors are required to participate. This analysis determines potential hazards and the plans and mitigative measures needed to address these hazards. Pipeline owner/operator documents will supplement these safety awareness concepts. The practice of analyzing and planning hazardous jobs, use of written procedures or permits, job review and discussion among key personnel, and walk through inspections ensure personnel understand potential hazards and the precautions needed to address them. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.2.2 Hazard Recognition Inspectors should evaluate the following areas to avoid incidents and raise awareness of hazards. Job Site —Job site incidents, including, but not limited to: slips, trips and falls, pinch points, elevated work surfaces, planned lifts, etc. Environmental —Changing environmental conditions, such as flooding, wind, dust, fires, and other potential conditions that could affect personnel and their work performance. Site-specific Hazards —Physical features, such as terrain, waterway crossings, utilities, general right-of-way (ROW) conditions, and other features the pipeline construction will encounter as it traverses its selected route. Climatic and Other Work Condition Hazards —The impact of adverse conditions, such as extremely hot weather (which could cause heat exhaustion and heat stroke) and cold weather (frostbite, hypothermia, encumbrance from extra clothing, etc.) on personnel. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Materials and Material Handling —Materials, including but not limited to their use, movement, and handling within the job site to consider adverse exposure and potential handling incidents. This may include but not be limited to pipe, valves, fittings, equipment, and materials such as asbestos-containing material, petroleum solvents, and heated materials. Use of material safety data sheets (MS D S) should be included along with hazard communication (HAZCOM) principles to inform workers of potential hazards and protective measures to be followed. Also be aware of hazardous materials (HAZMAT) exposed during construction. (See OSHA 1910.100 to 1910.119, 1910.1000 to 1910.1028, 1910.1200, and 1926 Subpart Z.) Work Task Review —An overall review of all major tasks to be performed since most construction activity involves moving equipment and lifting and carrying heavy loads in the proximity of personnel, trenches, holes, welding, metal sparks, and other hazardous activities. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Emergency Conditions —Preparation for response to safety-related incidents. Inspectors should be familiar with the emergency response plan, including but not limited to emergency phone numbers and locations of response equipment, such as water, fire extinguishers, first-aid supplies, etc. (see OSHA 1910.151, 1910.157, 1926.23, and 1926.24). Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: Hypothermia Hyperthermia encumbrance from extra clothing MSDS / MSS HAZCOM HAZMAT Emergency Respond Plan Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hypothermia - Hypothermia is a condition in which the body's core temperature drops below that required for normal metabolism and body functions. This is generally considered to be less than 35.0 °C (95.0 °F). (wiki) Hyperthermia - Hyperthermia is elevated body temperature due to failed thermoregulation that occurs when a body produces or absorbs more heat than it dissipates. Extreme temperature elevation then becomes a medical emergency requiring immediate treatment to prevent disability or death. The normal human body temperature in health can be as high as 37.7 °C (99.9 °F) in the late afternoon. Hyperthermia requires an elevation from the temperature that would otherwise be expected. Such elevations range from mild to extreme; body temperatures above 40 °C (104 °F) can be life-threatening. (wiki) Encumbrance - Restrictions of movement in this contexts. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hypothermia – Conducive Environment Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hypothermia – Conducive Environment Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hypothermia – Conducive Environment Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hazard: Hypothermia & Encumbrance from extra clothing Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Controlled Working Environment Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hyperthermia – Conducive Environment Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Good solutions - ICY Cool Break! Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Good solutions – Hot Coffee Break! Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.2.3 Contractor Requirements Inspectors should be familiar with the contract provisions regarding contractor(s) and their safety procedures (i.e. the contractor’s safety program and owner/operator expectations). The contractor is responsible for all safety on the work site. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.3 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 5.3.1 General The JSA (5.2) identifies hazards that necessitate the use of PPE. Inspection personnel should know when personal protective equipment (PPE) is necessary, what PPE is needed, and how PPE is to be properly used, including its limitations. Typically, PPE for pipeline construction includes but is not limited to approved eye, head, foot, hand, and hearing protection; safety apparel; respiratory devices; and various protective shields. (See OSHA 1910.132 and 1926.95.) 5.3.2 Eye Protection Eye protection includes safety glasses, safety glasses with side shields, goggles, face shields, and welding goggles and hoods. The type of eye protection required will depend on the hazard encountered. (See OSHA 1910.133 and 1926.102.) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.3.3 Head Protection Generally, head protection (approved hard hats) is required when injury could occur from impact or electrical shock . Normally, hard hats are worn at all times on every construction site or when otherwise dictated by owner/operator and contractor requirements. (See OSHA 1910.135 and 1926.100.) 5.3.4 Foot Protection Approved foot protection is also a standard requirement on construction sites. This protection includes boots or shoes of leather or leather-type construction that cover the entire foot along with safety toes . (See OSHA 1910.136 and 1926.96.) 5.3.5 Hand Protection Approved gloves should be worn depending on tasks involved (see OSHA 1910.138). Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.3.6 Hearing Protection Hearing protection is used when the work environment noise level exceeds 85 dBA over an 8-hour period based a noise level survey. This protection includes ear plugs or ear covers with suitable noise reduction factors. (See OSHA 1910.95, 1926.52, and 1926.101.) 5.3.7 Wearing Apparel Approved clothing identified in the JSA or depending on the tasks involved that protects against work hazards and the environment are required. For example, apparel could minimally include: fire retardant clothing, chemical resistant suits, leather for metal spark protection, etc. 5.3.8 Respiratory Protection This protection involves proper use of air-purifying respirators, air-supplied respirators, or self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). The type of respirator depends on the type of hazard encountered. Users of this equipment should have knowledge of owner/operator and contractor requirements and be trained in its use, especially mask fit test and the operation of the devices. (See OSHA 1910.134 and 1926.103.) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: 80dBA- Hearing protection is used when the work environment noise level exceeds 85 dBA over an 8-hour period based a noise level survey. Note: dbA- decibels measured on A scale SCBA - Self contained breathing apparatus. SCUBA - ? underwater.? Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

What is dbA / dBA Decibel A, B and C Sound pressure is not equally sensed by human ear at different frequencies - compensated with dB(A), dB(B) or dB(C) filters: The human ear is more sensitive to sound in the frequency range 1 kHz to 4 kHz than to sound at very low or high frequencies. Higher sound pressures are therefore acceptable at lower and higher frequencies than in the mid range. The knowledge about human ear is important in acoustic design and sound measurement. To compensate, sound meters are normally fitted with filters adapting the measured sound response to the human sense of sound. Common filters are dB(A) dB(B) dB(C) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/decibel-d_59.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

dB ABC Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

dB(A) The decibel A filter is widely used. dB(A) roughly corresponds to the inverse of the 40 dB (at 1 kHz) equal-loudness curve for the human ear. Using the dBA-filter, the sound level meter is less sensitive to very high and very low frequencies. Measurements made with this scale are expressed as dB(A). Note! The abbreviation dBA or db(A) is not recognised by SI. According to SI - use "the A weighted sound pressure level is x dB“ or "L A is x dB“ where x = weighted sound pressure level (dB) Anyway - dBA (or dB(A)) is commonly used. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

dB(B) and dB(C) The decibel C filter is practically linear over several octaves and is suitable for subjective measurements at very high sound pressure levels. The decibel B filter is between C and A. The B and C filters are seldom used. Comparing dB(A), dB(B) and dB(C) The decibel filters A, B and C are compared below: Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Example - Measuring dB(A) If sound pressure is measured at different octaves the resulting dB(A) sound pressure can be calculated by logarithmic addition. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/decibel-d_59.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

More Reading on: Sound in Absolute Scale SPL (Standard Pressure Level) Where 0dB correspond to SPL of 20 μ Pa http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-soundlevel.htm Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Weighted and Un-weighted Sound Level: Ears detect changes in sound pressure. Human hearing does not have a flat spectral sensitivity (frequency response) relative to frequency versus amplitude. Humans do not perceive low- and high-frequency sounds as well as they perceive sounds near 2,000 Hz, as shown in the equal-loudness contour. Because the frequency response of human hearing changes with amplitude, three weightings have been established for measuring sound pressure: A, B and C. A-weighting applies to sound pressures levels up to 55 dB, B-weighting applies to sound pressures levels between 55 and 85 dB, and C-weighting is for measuring sound pressure levels above 85 dB In order to distinguish the different sound measures a suffix is used: A-weighted sound pressure level is written either as dBA or LA. B-weighted sound pressure level is written either as dBB or LB, and C-weighted sound pressure level is written either as dBC or LC. Unweighted sound pressure level is called "linear sound pressure level" and is often written as dBL or just L. Some sound measuring instruments use the letter "Z" as an indication of linear SPL. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_pressure

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: Unweighted sound pressure level is called "linear sound pressure level" and is often written as dBL or just L. Some sound measuring instruments use the letter "Z" as an indication of linear SPL. My Question: SPL is the pressure measured without filter? Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_pressure

PowerPoint Presentation:

dbA Scale Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

dbA Scale Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

dbA Scale Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

SPL Scale Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

SCBA - Users of this equipment should have knowledge of owner/operator and contractor requirements and be trained in its use, especially mask fit test and the operation of the devices. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

SCBA - Users of this equipment should have knowledge of owner/operator and contractor requirements and be trained in its use, especially mask fit test and the operation of the devices. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

SCBA - Users of this equipment should have knowledge of owner/operator and contractor requirements and be trained in its use, especially mask fit test and the operation of the devices. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

SCBA - Users of this equipment should have knowledge of owner/operator and contractor requirements and be trained in its use, especially mask fit test and the operation of the devices. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

SC U BA Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.4 Loss Prevention Systems 5.4.1 General Inspectors should have a basic knowledge of general loss prevention systems and require additional training in owner/operator-specific processes. Inspectors should be familiar with these systems, which are designed to aid in observation, analysis, and reporting with easy to use forms for occurrences or actions that could harm/damage property, equipment, or materials. Examples include: lifting/hoisting pipe and equipment, excavation near pipelines or other utilities, marking/labeling, and other programs to increase awareness. 5.4.2 Near Misses Inspectors should be familiar with these programs, which formalize observation, analysis, reporting, and communication of occurrences that have happened, but did not lead to injury or damage. These programs can improve awareness and avoid future reoccurrences. Near misses should be discussed and communicated with everyone on the job site because some may not have known the event was a near miss. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.4.3 Safety Meetings Inspectors should be capable of organizing and conducting daily safety meetings, prior to beginning work, to cover such topics as potential hazards likely to be encountered, precautions necessary to lessen their threat, use of PPE, lessons learned, near misses, and other topics relevant to the safety of workers, the general public, and the inspection team and potential property damage. 5.5 Protective Measures for Radiation Inspectors should be aware of valid certification and licensing of nondestructive testing (NDT) personnel handling radioactive sources. Inspectors should also be aware of signage and safety monitoring rules and requirements. NDT inspectors also should know the rules and regulations for the state that they are working in; all state rules and regulations differ. Inspectors should be familiar with NRC radiation exposure dosage limits, monitoring methods, precautions needed, and documentation of radiation exposure (see 10 CFR 20.1301 and 20.1302 and NORM conditions). Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Keywords: NRC: United State, Nuclear Regulatory Commission Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang http://www.nrc.gov/

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.6 Job Site and Facility Security Inspectors should have knowledge of the measures needed to ensure public and worker safety as well as safeguards for equipment, property, and materials such as the following. Procedures for site security and other safekeeping procedures, including use of surveillance and monitoring devices, security personnel, barriers, locking devices/systems, fencing, and other methods to deny access to materials, supplies, and equipment. Traffic control, barrier, and marking procedures, including familiarization with the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). Familiarity with and requirements for transportation worker identification credentials (TWIC) and maritime levels of security (MARSEC). This is only necessary when working in facilities covered by these requirements. Owner/ operator provide training on the pertinent requirements. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Pipeline Inspector Safeguarding Integrity on: MUTCD TWIC MARSEC Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Pipeline Inspector Safeguarding Integrity on: MUTCD TWIC MARSEC Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Mean Transportation Worker The good abiding: MUTCD TWIC MARSEC Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Law Breaker: MUTCD TWIC MARSEC Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.7 Required Work Permits 5.7.1 General Inspectors should have knowledge of work situations that require work permits and the permit limitations and restrictions. Required permitting is specific to owner/operator requirements, and inspectors should have general knowledge of all identified areas, including but not limited to the following: confined space entry (see OSHA 1910.146); isolation of hazardous energy sources (see OSHA 1910.147); hot work [see OSHA 1910.119(k)]; excavation (see OSHA 1926.650 and 1926.651); explosive blasting (see OSHA 1910.109 and OSHA 1926.900 to 1926.914). Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Permit to Works: Hot Works Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Permit to Works: Confined Space Entry Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Permit to Works: Isolation of hazardous energy sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Permit to Works: Excavation Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Permit No:

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.7.2 Road and Highway Use Inspectors should have knowledge of permit requirements and restrictions for heavy equipment, stringing trucks, and tracked equipment (either its movement or hauling from one location to another) as to any size and weight restrictions relative to the roads and bridges being used by these types of vehicles. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Road and Highway Use Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Road and Highway Use Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Road and Highway Use Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Road and Highway Use Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Road and Highway Use Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.8 Rigging and Lifting Safety Rigging and lifting requirements are owner/operator-specific programs. Inspectors should have general knowledge of OSHA 1910.180 and 1910.184, including the following: rigging techniques, terminology, labeling, tagging, and inspection prior to use; lifting devices and types, terminology, locating and observing condition of equipment, extension and boom height limits, device inspection requirements, hand signals, proficiency of personnel involved in rigging and machine operation, suspended loads over personnel, and reporting unacceptable practices (see OSHA 1926.250 and 1926.251). Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.9 Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources 5.9.1 General Inspectors should have an understanding of when and how electrical, mechanical equipment or pressure in the system is deenergized and isolated to prevent unexpected startup or release of stored energy that may cause a hazard. (See OSHA 1910.147.) 5.9.2 Electrical Energy Sources Inspectors should recognize energy sources, deenergized and energized, requiring lockout/tagout (LOTO) or other practices to prevent exposure to electrical hazards. 5.9.3 Other Energy Sources Inspectors should recognize equipment and piping, valves, etc. requiring LOTO or other precautions to prevent exposure to machinery operation or pressure release. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

ALL DEAD – Prior to the explosion where one the lucky Supervisor took the picture before leaving for lunch, the yellow man was the Safety Officer. Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Isolation of Hazardous Energy Sources Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.10 Excavation, Trenching, and Boring Safety 5.10.1 General Inspectors should be knowledgeable about excavation safety. New pipeline construction involves an extensive amount of excavation and trenching work in one form or another. As a result, the existence of and exposure to potential hazards related to this activity is widespread. Because of the magnitude of this activity and its associated hazards, pipeline inspectors are required to know what facets to observe, how to take corrective action, and what protective systems and procedures should be employed. (See OSHA 1926 Subpart P.) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

5.10.2 One Call One call is a telephonic excavation notification system set up to coordinate excavators’ activities with utility owner/operators to prevent damage to underground facilities. Inspectors should have an understanding of these systems, know the appropriate contact information for the area of pipeline construction activity, and assure the work can proceed safely after utilities are located and marked by the one call responder(s). (See CGA’s Best Practices - Chapter 3, One Call Center and/or applicable state one call rovisions/requirements.) Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.10.3 Excavation Regulations and Requirements The provisions included in OSHA 1926 Subpart P should be part of pipeline inspectors knowledge. These provisions are often supplemented by pipeline owner/operator requirements. Qualified inspectors should know pertinent definitions such as competent person, benching, sloping, and shields as well as hazardous conditions that could be present and precautionary measures to be considered prior to and during trenching/excavations (competent person). It is also important to know about spoil placement, soil classification, soil testing procedures, and the soil types along with the use of test equipment, protective measures needed, documentation requirements, and the potential impact of other factors, such as weather conditions, traffic, groundwater, and machinery operating near excavations. Additionally it is important to know the plans for handling and disposal of previously existing contaminated materials.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Field Soil Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mackintosh Probe Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mackintosh Probe Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mackintosh Probe Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Sieve Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.10.4 Use of Explosive for Excavation Inspectors should have a basic understanding of blasting plans, how explosives are used, the hazards associated with their use, and precautionary measures to be taken to ensure the safety of workers and the general public (see OSHA 1910.109, OSHA 1926.900 to 1926.914, and 49 CFR 177.835). Inspectors should know the owner/operator procedures for blasting and have procedures for dealing with foreign utilities in the area.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Trench

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mechanical Means

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mechanical Means

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mechanical Means

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Explosives

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Explosives

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Explosives

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.10.5 Foreign Crossings (Other Utilities) Inspectors should be familiar with location methods for other utilities, such as other pipelines, telephone lines, television cables, sewers, fiber optic cables, electric lines, water pipes, and other underground (or overhead) structures, marking such structures, and communicating with third-party utility owner/operators to prevent damage due to mechanized excavation activities. Inspectors should also be familiar with how to monitor and assess hand digging, hydro-vacuum, dry air techniques, and other nonmechanized means to uncover these utilities when working near underground structures as well as how to support exposed lines once they are uncovered. (See CGA’s Best Practices—Chapters 3, 4, and 5 and Appendices A and B.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Non Mechanized Excavation Techniques Hand digging, hydro-vacuum, dry air techniques, and other non-mechanized means

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.11 Confined Space Entry Requirements 5.11.1 General Inspectors should be familiar with the confined space requirements for pipeline construction. Confined space is a space that can be bodily entered by an individual but is not designed for continuous occupancy and has a limited and restricted means of entrance or exit (egress). Inspectors should also be aware that areas may contain an atmosphere that is hazardous (toxic, explosive, oxygen deficient, or otherwise harmful to personnel). Inspectors should be aware that permits are required for confined space entry when either a hazardous atmosphere exists, it contains material where an occupant could be engulfed, or is configured where an occupant could be trapped. (See OSHA 1910.146.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.11.2 Rescue and Emergency Services Inspectors should be familiar with the various responses needed to effectuate a rescue from a confined space, the equipment required, and administration of first aid and/or how to get medical treatment if needed (competent person). Inspectors are required to make sure that a plan is in place for these activities [see OSHA 1910.146(k)].

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.12 Atmospheric Testing 5.12.1 General Inspectors should be knowledgeable about conditions that would require atmospheric testing. Atmospheric testing, particularly in cases involving confined spaces, hot work, and work in hazardous areas, is required to evaluate the hazards of a work space. A hazardous atmosphere means an atmosphere that may be immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) or exceeds permissible exposure limits (PELs). (See OSHA 1910.146 Appendices B and D.) The conditions are classified as follows: flammable gas, vapor, mist, or dust in excess of LFL; oxygen deficient/excess environments where oxygen levels are below 19.5 % or above 23.5 %; PELs (permissible exposure limits) (see OSHA 1910.1000); other atmospheric conditions or concentrations of toxic contaminants that may be IDLH (Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health) (see OSHA 1926 Subpart Z).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.12 Atmospheric Testing 5.12.1 General Inspectors should be knowledgeable about conditions that would require atmospheric testing. Atmospheric testing, particularly in cases involving confined spaces, hot work, and work in hazardous areas, is required to evaluate the hazards of a work space. A hazardous atmosphere means an atmosphere that may be immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) or exceeds permissible exposure limits (PELs). (See OSHA 1910.146 Appendices B and D.) The conditions are classified as follows: flammable gas, vapor, mist, or dust in excess of LFL (Lower Explosion Limit) ; oxygen deficient/excess environments where oxygen levels are below 19.5 % or above 23.5 %; PELs (permissible exposure limits) (see OSHA 1910.1000); other atmospheric conditions or concentrations of toxic contaminants that may be IDLH (Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health) (see OSHA 1926 Subpart Z).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Oxygen deficient/excess environments where oxygen levels are; below 19.5 % or above 23.5 %; Normal O2 concentration of air: 21% The limits are -1.5%/+2.5% -1.5%/+2.5%

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.12.2 Other Facets of Atmospheric Testing Inspectors should have an understanding and knowledge of the following facets of atmospheric testing (see OSHA 1910.146 Appendix B): products and materials being used on the job site as well as HAZMAT that could be exposed during construction and create hazards to personnel safety (see OSHA 1926.57); physical properties of toxins (lighter/heavier than air, etc.) and PELs, including use of MSS information; measurement and monitoring techniques and use of testing equipment, procedures to calibrate this equipment, the frequency of calibration, and verification of instrument calibration; precautionary measures to be taken considering the findings from testing and monitoring both prior to entry into or work episodes within a hazardous atmosphere.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.13 Respiratory Protection Inspectors need to be knowledgeable about conditions that may require utilization of SCBA, air-purifying respirators, and OSHA regulations. Inspectors should be aware of the different types of equipment, the availability and accessibility of respirator equipment, including air-purifying, air-supplied, and SCBA respirators, and when respirators may be needed. [See OSHA 1910.134(b), 1910.134(d), and 1910.134(e).]

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.14 Fall Prevention and Protective Systems 5.14.1 General New pipeline construction work sites commonly have fall and tripping hazards primarily due to extensive excavations, rugged and varied terrain features, and the constant movement of the work (see OSHA 1926.25, 1926.26, and 1926.500 to 1926.503). Inspectors should be aware of owner/operator requirements addressing these hazards. 5.14.2 Fall/Tripping Hazard Measures Inspectors should be able to observe, recognize, assess, and be prepared to take appropriate action on the following fall hazards: the nature and extent of fall hazards; fall protective systems such as barricades, fall prevention markers, limitations on access, and other protection systems in place as well as construction personnel awareness of potential fall hazards; general housekeeping within the work area and adequacy of work site illumination to minimize fall and tripping hazards.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.15 Scaffolding and Ladders Scaffolding and ladders is equipment that is occasionally used in pipeline construction, mostly for aboveground work like valve settings. Inspectors should be familiar with scaffolding as to when it is needed, how it is to be used safely, and proper erection/construction by qualified scaffold erectors. (See OSHA 1910.28 and OSHA 1926.450 to 1926.454.) Inspectors should be aware of owner/operator requirements covering safe use of scaffolding. Inspectors should be familiar with safe ladder use (e.g. deeper excavations), ladder condition, and design as well as assuring the proper equipment is used for the work situation (see OSHA 1926.1053 and 1926.1060). Inspectors should be aware of owner/operator requirements regarding safe use of ladders.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.16 Use, Movement, Storage, and Inspection of Tools, Equipment, and Materials 5.16.1 General It is the contractor’s responsibility to inspect and maintain their equipment. Inspectors should be aware and observant of the use, movement, storage, condition, and inspection of tools, equipment, and materials being used in pipeline construction work, even though these materials may be owned and used by the construction contractor. The contractor should have an inspection program for equipment, and the inspector ensures that the inspection program is being followed.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Construction Equipment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Construction Equipment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Construction Equipment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Construction Equipment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.16.2 Transportation, Use, and Storage of Flammable and Combustible Liquids Inspectors should observe and ensure the contractor is complying with the requirements for the way flammable and combustible liquids are being moved and handled (see OSHA 1910.106 and 1926.152). Flammable Liquids: Liquids having a flashpoint below 100 °F (37.8 °C) are known as Class I liquids. The most common is gasoline. Combustible Liquids: Liquids having a flashpoint at or above 100 °F (37.8 °C) and are known as Class II liquids. The most common are diesel fuel; Class III liquids include jet fuel and motor oil. (See NFPA 30, 49 CFR 177, and OSHA 1910.106.) Inspectors should know how these liquids are used, transported, and stored, which requires ongoing observation and correction action when safety is jeopardized. Fueling practices, condition of equipment, containers, signs, and spillage are additional areas of interest for inspectors.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Flammable Liquids: Class I Liquids having a flashpoint below 100 °F (37.8 °C) are known as Class I liquids. The most common is gasoline. Combustible Liquids: Class II Liquids having a flashpoint at or above 100 °F (37.8 °C) and are known as Class II liquids. The most common are diesel fuel; Combustible Liquids: Class III Including jet fuel and motor oil. (See NFPA 30, 49 CFR 177, and OSHA 1910.106.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Flammable Class III- Jet Fuel

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Flammable Class II- Diesel Fuel

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.16.3 Transportation, Handling, Labeling, Storage, and Use of Compressed Gases Inspectors should be aware of proper use, movement, handling, and storage of pressurized gases (see OSHA 1910.101, 1926.153, and 1926.803). Typical compressed gases used in new pipeline construction include: oxygen and acetylene (welding/ cutting operations), nitrogen (purging), LPG (heating /drying), and compressed air (pneumatic tools, grit blasting, tire inflation, painting, etc.). Inspector’s knowledge of the properties of these gases will aid in their safe handling, storage, and use. All compressed gas cylinders and tanks should be properly secured and labeled when transported and stored with valve protective caps in place when cylinders are not in use. Cylinders, safety release devices, and piping should be regularly inspected to ensure the equipment and its appurtenances are in acceptable condition. [See OSHA 1910.101, 1910.102 (acetylene), 1910.104 (oxygen), and 1910.110 (LPG); 49 CFR 177.400; and 49 CFR 177.844.]

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Nitrogen supplied from truck tanks (large cylinders), piping, connections, and appurtenances should be checked for safe design, periodic inspection and testing, installation, and use. Compressed Air—Compression equipment should be in serviceable condition for the service needed with operable safety devices in place. Hoses, piping, and connections should be checked for suitability for service and safe placement to prevent damage or rupture. Use of compressed air should follow established safety practices. (See OSHA 1926.803.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.16.4 Safe Use of Tools, Equipment, and Materials 5.16.4.1 General Inspectors should monitor the following for both safety and job efficiency purposes. 5.16.4.2 Tools Pipeline construction requires many different kinds of tools, from hand tools to various power tools (electric and pneumatic), and with the large number and types of tools, numerous hazards exist (see OSHA 1910.180, 1910.184, 1910.215, 1910.241 to 1910.244, 1910.254, and 1926.300 to 1926.303). Key factors for avoiding these hazards include: use the right tool for the job; tool condition; correct use of the tool; safety features such as guards and welding hoods are in place; personnel are properly using protective equipment, including but not limited to: hard hats, facial shields, and other PPE as well as suitable clothing for the type of work.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.16.4.3 Motorized Work Equipment Work equipment from large trucks to tracked dozers/side booms to trenching equipment and other machinery may be employed from one end of the job site (spread) to the other. The safety issues to be considered with this equipment when working near or around it as they move throughout the spread while carrying and lowering loads include (see OSHA 1926.550 and OSHA 1926.600 to 1926.604): operator actions and ability to smoothly and properly operate his/her assigned machine (i.e. an indication of the level of training, operating proficiency, awareness of his/her surroundings, and ability to follow hand signals and safety rules) (see OSHA 1926.600 and 1926.602); equipment condition, maintenance level, and protective equipment in place; correct equipment and operation for the job (e.g. lifting capacity, boom positions, stabilizer use, and load limitations).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.17 Facility, Commissioning, and Pre-start-up Review Inspectors should be familiar with pipeline owner/operator pre-start-up review procedures and checklists. Inspectors should understand owner/operator management of change (MOC) requirements and why adherence to them can prevent incidents. In the case of construction, MOC concepts recognize, document, and communicate such factors as changes in personnel, organizational makeup, physical configuration/layouts, equipment, site conditions, materials, and procedures, if required.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.18 Regulatory Agency Inspections Inspectors should follow pipeline owner/operator procedures in handling outside party inspection of construction activities. These agencies, whether federal, state, or local, have the authority to come on the job site to inspect construction activities and documents/records. Inspectors should be able to determine the agency involved, determine their objectives, check credentials, and know the requirements set forth by the owner/operator on providing information to the agency conducting the inspection. (See PHMSA Form 7 for an example.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 5.19 Vehicle Operation Inspectors are called on to operate various types of vehicles off and on the pipeline construction ROW, including vehicles that may be company owned, rented/leased, or personal vehicles. Inspectors should understand the owner/ operator policies and procedures governing the use of vehicles and be licensed appropriately. (See OSHA 1926.601.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Recommended practice for basic inspection requirements – new pipeline construction API RP 2014-September My Self Study Exam Preparatory Notes- Part 2

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6 Environmental and Pollution Control Requirements 6.1 Scope This section outlines the requirements to be used to establish the pipeline construction inspector’s knowledge of environmental protection and pollution control aspects in order to ensure compliance with regulations, industry practice, and pipeline owner/operator requirements. Inspectors with basic knowledge of the areas below will have an improved ability to observe, monitor, verify, report, and correct deficiencies involving protection of the environment. The owner/operator has procedures for compliance in this area, and the inspector should understand where their job function involves covered activities.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.2 Erosion, Sediment, and Runoff Control on the Pipeline ROW Inspectors should have an understanding that the extensive excavation work, earthmoving, clearing, and other similar activities associated with pipeline construction have the potential to impact the environment. Inspectors should be observant of these activities to avoid incidents. Familiarization with the key parts of the following regulations and practices will aid in safeguarding the environment (see OSHA 1910.180, 1910.181, and 1926 Subpart P):

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang the scope, purpose, and provisions of the Federal Water Pollution and Control Act (FWPCA) of 1972 (especially, Subpart A) as amended, also known as the Clean Water Act (40 CFR 110), as well as local, county, and municipal county requirements; the installation, uses, and maintenance of erosion, sediment, and runoff controls, such as diversion devices, silt fences, and other equipment for control of surface water; familiarity with storm water pollution prevention plans (SWP3), including federal and state plans (where construction is taking place) and NPDES requirements; local revegetation requirements and pipeline owner/operator practices consistent with the needs of the ROW, landowners, and local practices should be reviewed by the inspection team.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.3 Federal, State, and Typical Local Environmental Permits Inspectors should be aware of the provisions of any applicable federal, state, and local permits, including but not limited to the following: different types of permits and which governmental agency has jurisdiction over the permits; typical requirements and provisions contained within these permits to aid in ascertaining compliance during construction

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.4 Major Statutes 6.4.1 General Inspectors should have a basic understanding of the following major environmental protection statutes and the precautions/actions needed during construction to ensure compliance. A report should be provided by the owner/ operator prior to construction that outlines the statutes and the precautions/ actions that apply to the project. NOTE: Construction contract provisions generally highlight those statutes that must be considered during the project. 6.4.2 National Historic Preservation Act (1966 as Amended) (36 CFR 800) Inspectors should be familiar with the National Historic Preservation Act as to how it may impact owner/operator operations. This legislation sets up processes to consider the effects on historic properties and the Act seeks to avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties. It often sets out the archeological issues relating to economic development and the resultant construction activity.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.4.3 Endangered Species Act (1973 as Amended) (50 CFR 402) Inspectors should be familiar with the Endangered Species Act as to how it may impact owner/operator operations. This legislation seeks to prevent extinction of selected wildlife and plants, aid recovery/maintenance of endangered populations and critical habitats, and prevent/mitigate harm to the list of species. 6.4.4 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (1976 as Amended) (40 CFR 261) Inspectors should be familiar with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as to how it may impact owner/ operator operations. This legislation governs solid and hazardous waste generation, transport, and disposal. 6.4.5 Comprehensive Environmental Recovery, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (1980 as Amended) (40 CFR 300) Inspectors should be familiar with the Comprehensive Environmental Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act as to how it may impact owner/operator operations. This legislation covers hazardous substances, site contamination, and cleanup.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.4.6 Hazardous Materials Inspectors should have a general understanding of the following: designation of HAZMAT (40 CFR 116); identification and listing of hazardous waste (40 CFR 261.3, OSHA 1910.1200, and OSHA 1926.65); hazardous waste table, HAZCOM, and emergency response information (49 CFR 172, OSHA 1910.120 and OSHA 1910.1200); general information and definitions (49 CFR 171, 49 CFR 171.8, and OSHA 1910.1200).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Smart Pipeline Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Lord President

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Council

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.5 Water Crossing Permits Inspectors should be familiar with environmental requirements for crossings of waterway crossings, water bodies, and wetlands, including the following: Inspectors should be familiar with and knowledgeable of types of crossing permits and the governmental agencies overseeing these permits. Inspectors should have an understanding of different water crossing installation and timing practices to comply with permit provisions. Inspectors should have an understanding of requirements for waterway and water body bank restoration, stabilization, and erosion control measures, including facilities to minimize erosion. Inspectors should be knowledgeable of owner/operator procedures and expectations for inspections by responsible agencies, including determining the objective of the inspection, checking credentials, and knowing who should handle escorting the inspection personnel and answering their questions. Inspectors should have an understanding of permit documentation requirements and closeout procedure, including any deadlines.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Yellow Stone National Park

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Guilin Park

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ChongQing Yangtze/Jialin River

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Somewhere in China

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Nujiang China

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.6 Use of Natural Water Sources Inspector should understand the rules governing water withdrawal from and discharges to any natural water sources for water used on the ROW including for hydrostatic test medium. Withdrawal/disposal should be planned and executed in accordance with the following: Inspectors should have an understanding of withdrawal and/or discharge/disposal requirements within permits, including limitations on amounts of water used or discharged and the measurement of those quantities. Inspectors should have an understanding of discharge velocity, turbidity, and other restrictions, including but not limited to sediment and other foreign substances, control and planned treatment, filtration, or other methods needed to meet water quality provisions. Inspectors must be familiar with sampling methods, procedures, and protocols to comply with permit and/or regulatory provisions.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Natural Water Sources

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Natural Water Sources

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Natural Water Sources

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Natural Water Sources

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Use of Natural Water Sources

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 6.7 Handling Contamination Issues Inspectors should strive to prevent any type of environmental contamination. In the event of an incident, inspectors should immediately report the event to the owner/operator and be aware of owner/operator mitigation procedures. Inspectors should have a basic awareness of how to identify contamination and who to contact in an event of an incident. Inspectors should: know the procedures to obtain samples, request analytical work, and recognize, handle, and monitor contaminated substances such as: soil, pipe coating, fuels, solvents, and other waste and/or contaminants [e.g. asbestos, chromate, horizontal directional drilling (HDD) mud, and other potentially toxic/hazardous substances] (see OSHA 1910.1200 and 1926.65);

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ensure RCRA provisions are followed, if required, including waste generation and disposal activities related to the pipeline project in accordance with owner operator expectations (see OSHA 1910.120); check the plan of action for the remediation of suspected or actual contamination and best practices for remediation, [e.g. fuel and drilling mud spills or other contamination]. Inspectors should have knowledge of who to contact and what response, if any, the inspector may need to take in the event of an incident (see OSHA 1926.65); monitor good housekeeping practices to collect and remove waste, including those classified as hazardous, from the work site at regular intervals (see OSHA 1926.25); have knowledge of the requirements in SPCC plans developed by or for pipeline owner/operators and approved and certified by a PE; review key points within prevention and pollution control best management practices (BMP) set forth by the U.S. EPA as they may apply to owner/operator requirements.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang SPCC - S pill prevention, control, and containment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Contamination Issues : HDD- horizontal directional drilling mud

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Contamination Issues : HDD- horizontal directional drilling mud

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Contamination Issues : HDD- horizontal directional drilling mud

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Contamination Issues : Field Joint Surface Preparations abrasive

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Contamination Issues : Field Joint Coating Paints

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7 General Pipeline Construction Requirements 7.1 Scope The requirements outlined in this section spell out the areas of knowledge that a qualified pipeline construction inspector needs to effectively perform his duties on the ground as the construction progresses through all stages. This section covers construction or construction-related areas that the inspectors are called upon to inspect, evaluate compliance versus requirements, resolve issues, assess and foster job progress, report observations/findings, and complete the documentation necessary to meet the expectations of the pipeline owner/operator or other entity in charge of the construction project.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.2 Verification of Construction Personnel Qualifications 7.2.1 General Inspectors should use the following to facilitate their verification process for key personnel performing work on the project. 7.2.2 Operator Qualification (OQ) Inspectors should understand the concepts of OQ, including but not limited to covered tasks and evaluation of qualifications. Inspectors should know that some tasks within the construction arena are covered tasks (e.g. inspection activities for tie-ins, application and repair of external coating, line locating, excavation of foreign utilities, and backfilling a trench). (See 49 CFR 192.801 to 192.807 and 49 CFR 195.501 to 195.509.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.2.3 Verification Procedures Assurance of certification and/or qualification is a necessary step in achieving proper performance and project quality objectives. Inspectors should be prepared to check and verify the certifications and/or other qualification documentation of certain crucial pipeline construction personnel and technicians performing specialized work, including quality and materials examination and testing. The key areas to verify certification and qualification include, but are not limited to (see ASME B31.4 Sections 434.1, 434.2, and 434.3; ASME B31.8 Sections 802.2.5, 806, and 841.2.2; 49 CFR 192.303, 192.305, and 192.307; 49 CFR 195.200, 195.202, 195.204, and 195.206; and ANSI/ASNT SNT-TC-1A):

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang — welders, — heavy equipment operators, — blasting/explosive personnel, — excavation (competent personnel), — NDE/NDT technicians, — coating personnel, — corrosion control technicians, — safety professionals, — environmental specialists, — qualified pipeline inspectors. Pipeline regulation, code, standard, and practice references, such as 49 CFR 195, ASME B31.4, ASME B31.8, API, ASNT, AWS, and NACE, contain various provisions for use of certified, qualified, and/or competent personnel, including pipeline construction inspectors.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Personnel Verification: Qualified in the work performed

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Personnel Verification: Qualified in the work performed

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Personnel Verification: Qualified in the work performed

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Personnel Verification: Qualified in the work performed

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Personnel Verification: Qualified in the work performed

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Personnel Verification: Qualified in the work performed

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3 ROW Inspection Requirements 7.3.1 General Pipeline inspectors should be familiar with the following ROW-related requirements (see ASME B31.4 Section 434.3; ASME B31.8 Sections 802.2.5, 806, and 841.2.2; 49 CFR 195.210; and 49 CFR 192). 7.3.2 Pipeline Route Review Inspectors should know how to observe and report any discovered or any potential pipeline route selection deficiencies or obstacles, such as terrain features; landowner issues; road, railroad, or waterway crossings; environmental features; cultural features; and protected resources (i.e. drinking water and proximity to occupied facilities). 7.3.3 Land Surveying Aspects Inspectors should be familiar with basic land surveying terminology and definitions, including section, range, and township references, legal property descriptions, metes and bounds descriptions, fee property details, color coding of flagging, and other basic Public Land Surveying System information. (See ASME B31.4 Section 434.33.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ROW – Right of Way

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ROW – Right of Way

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3.4 Pipeline Stationing Inspectors should be familiar with pipeline stationing and equations. Pipeline stationing and equations, including how they are determined, is defined by the owner/operator. Typically, pipeline stationing is the linear survey measurements in feet and shown in hundreds of feet (stations) with additional footage shown as pluses. For example, 10,000 feet would be 100+00. Equations are used to correct the survey stationing when pipe is either added or taken out of the pipeline, necessitated, for example, by pipeline relocation. Inspectors should also understand the difference between and use of construction stationing and as-built stationing.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Surveying

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Clearing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Clearing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Trenching

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Trenching

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Pipe Bending

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Pipe Bending

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Pipe Bending

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Welding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Welding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Welding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Welded Section

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying - Tie-In Joint http://www.lavalleyindustries.com/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Weld Repair Before 0r After Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- RT

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- RT

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Weld Repair Before 0r After Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Field Joint PE Wrapping & HT Holiday Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- CP either Impressed or Sacrificial Terminations Termination

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pre-Backfilling Survey: Joint Location Survey

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Revegetation

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang POST Land Surveying- Revegetation

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3.5 ROW Agreement Provisions Inspectors should be knowledgeable of typical ROW agreement provisions and how and where to find the provisions in the following areas: Widths specified in the ROW agreement that grants an easement or legal right to work within and use the defined strip of land or area. Typical limitations, restrictions, and special conditions spelled out in the ROW agreement that could include temporary work space, special conditions that recognize adjacent property or structures, or access provisions. Ingress and egress provisions that facilitate access to and exits from the easement for work equipment and vehicles and surface damage provisions, including types of crops, trees, orchards, other ROW cover, landowner structures such as fences, drain tile, cattle guards, soil compaction, and other potential damage from construction. Specific instructions/agreements between the landowner and the pipeline owner regarding the easement and construction activities (i.e. preservation of certain areas, ownership of cleared trees, etc.). These are typically found on “line lists” developed and maintained by the land agents.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3.6 Other Defined Land Use Inspectors should know what to look for in the following areas within and outside the construction spread as to space, dimensions, and location, including but not limited to the following. Work areas that may require extra space beyond the ROW to facilitate construction activities, such as waterway and roadway crossings. Material storage/staging areas, including pipe yards and lay down areas ( e.g. space to weld up pipe for installing a waterway crossing). Equipment parking areas where machinery that is not in current use, such as cranes and derricks, dozers, side boom tractors, and equipment hauling tractor/trailers, can be held/staged near the construction spread until needed. Fee property needed for the project, which typically includes pump station or compressor station sites, block valve sites, and rectifier/ground bed locations.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Use: Material storage/staging areas

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Use: Material storage/staging areas

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Use: Material storage/staging areas

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Use : Side Boom Storage

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Use : Compression Station Site

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Land Use : Other activities (hydrostatic testing)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.3.7 Pipeline and Site Staking and Marking Conventions Inspectors should understand the following as to survey directions for the pipeline route and directives for construction. Nomenclature on stakes and markers and its meaning - usually this includes information such as: pipeline stationing, direction changes, additional ditch depth, changes in pipe wall thickness, etc. Maintaining these items during construction and how to reestablish destroyed, damaged, or misplaced stakes and/or markers. A surveying contractor typically is ‘called in to reestablish missing markers/stakes. Color coding of the survey flagging for common utilities, construction centerline, edge of easement, edge of temporary work space, and extra work space.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Site Staking and Marking Conventions

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.4 Locating and Marking Requirements Inspectors should be knowledgeable of procedures for proper location of underground facilities being crossed or near the construction and the temporary marking of them during construction to ensure safety and avoid/minimize damage. Inspectors should also be aware of the OQ covered tasks within this work. (See 49 CFR 192 Subpart N, 49 CFR 195 Subpart G, CGA’s Best Practices , and the state one call systems.) Inspectors need to: understand the contractor’s approved foreign utility locating techniques, including probing (if allowed), use of electronic locators, and other equipment/means and procedures used to accurately locate underground utilities or structures; understand the one call systems in the area where construction is taking place, including how the systems(s) work, pertinent phone numbers, insisting on third-party response and use of suitable markers, and who is responsible to make one call notifications—typically the contractor is responsible for the work;

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang be familiar with the owner/operator specifications as applicable and contractor’s procedures for road and railway crossings, including markers, safety signs, barricades, and other safety features, especially those required by crossing permits and/or governmental authorities; know the owner/operator requirements for location of permanent pipeline markers, including warning signs, aerial markers, and waterway crossing signs, for placement during cleanup operations.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Underground Markers

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Underground Markers

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Underground Service Locator

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Underground Service Locator

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.5 ROW Preparation Requirements 7.5.1 General Inspectors need to be knowledgeable of owner/operator ROW preparation requirements. After construction begins, the inspectors need to observe, monitor, and verify adherence to specifications and ROW agreements and deal with landowners/tenants or coordinate with the responsible party (i.e. land agent and other interested parties in the following areas). 7.5.2 Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading Inspectors need to be knowledgeable of owner/operator requirements for clearing, grubbing, and grading. Clearing means removal and disposal of all brush, undergrowth, and timber. Grubbing means removal and disposal of stumps and roots within the specified ROW. Grading involves the flattening, sloping, or other excavation to modify the terrain along the pipeline route to make it safe and accessible for construction. Inspectors need to know what needs to be moved out of the way, including trees, brush, and other vegetation; grass; certain rocks; and other obstacles, and if the preparation work allows the passage of construction equipment and other vehicles to facilitate the safe and satisfactory progress of the construction. In monitoring these activities, inspectors need to consider the following:

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang equipment for the job is suitable for the work involved, including sufficient size, power, and operating condition; how the equipment is being used to minimize collateral damage and assuring that equipment operators are aware of their surroundings and operate their machines in a competent manner; the end result of these operations (i.e. the finished work meets owner/operator specifications, and the prepared ROW allows construction to proceed smoothly and safely); that clearing, grubbing, and grading are typically permitted activities and that those activities meet the permit conditions.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.5.3 Landowner/Tenant Assets Inspectors need to be aware of landowner requirements, including but not limited to the following: monitoring removal of permanent fencing, installation of temporary fencing and gates, handling cattle guards, construction pathway offsets, and bypassing other man-made facilities will aid in smooth construction progress and minimize landowner/ tenant concerns and damage to surrounding property. These requirements are normally found on the construction “line list” typically developed and maintained by the land agents. 7.5.4 Interfacing with Landowners/Tenants Inspectors need to conduct open and forthright communication with landowner/tenants in communicating construction plans and requesting feedback on concerns and meet with the owner/operator concerning the release of procedures in order to minimize discontent and misunderstandings. Some owner/operators require that this function be done by the land agents, but there is usually interaction between the landowners and the inspectors.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6 Ditching and Excavation Requirements 7.6.1 General Inspectors must know proper ditching and excavations procedures to ensure correct pipeline alignment, depth, width, slope, and spoil placement to facilitate efficient and safe pipe laying operations. Inspectors must consider the following in overseeing this aspect of the project (see ASME B31.4 Sections 434.3.2 and 434.6 and 49 CFR 195.248).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.2 Damage Prevention Practices During Ditching/Excavation Work 7.6.2.1 General Inspectors must be knowledgeable about damage prevention practices, including but not limited to the following. 7.6.2.2 Underground Utilities Ensure that one call notification procedures have been followed, that crossed utilities are clearly marked and uncovered by non-mechanized means as per the owner/operator guidelines and foreign utility crossing procedure ( i.e. hand digging, hydro-vacuum , or other means to prevent damage to the lines), and that uncovered utilities are properly supported to maintain their integrity (see 49 CFR 195.442, 49 CFR 192.325, CGA’s Best Practices , API 1166, and state one call systems).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.2.3 Other Physical Property Near the Excavation Ensure adequate space is maintained between other structures and ditching/excavation equipment and that placement of spoil does not damage adjacent structures or other assets nor impede traffic and/or other pathways. 7.6.3 Ditch Features 7.6.3.1 General Inspectors should monitor, measure, where necessary, report, if required, and conduct continual excavation inspections in the following areas related to the ditching operation and in accordance with OSHA 1926.651. 7.6.3.2 Ditch Specifications Ensure the specifications are followed for: ditch depth and width, bottom of ditch condition (i.e. uniform bearing surface, free of hard objects, free of water, use of dirt pads, and where possible, depth adjustments are made to minimize the need for sags and over-bends).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.3.3 Breaks in the Ditch Verify that breaks are left in the ditch to allow passage of vehicles, livestock, and/or wildlife. 7.6.3.4 Extra Depth Ditch Requirements Ensure depth specifications are met and observe and measure where extra depth starts and ends and record this information. 7.6.3.5 Multilevel Ditch Requirements Ensure that the designated levels of soil are properly removed and separated in accordance with specifications [ e.g. top soil (higher quality soil) is separated from deeper ditch spoil and/or multiple stratifications]. 7.6.3.6 Ditch Breakers Ensure that ditch breakers are installed as required at the edge of wetlands in accordance with the permits and construction specifications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Two Distinct Meanings Ditch Breaker - allow passage of vehicles, livestock, and/ or wildlife. Ditch / Trench Breaker - During the backfilling it is important to install water stops or trench breakers that prevent water washing down the porous trench material and causing subsidence. Breakers are also required to safeguard valuable wetland sites that otherwise would be drained by the trench. Breakers can be formed from imported clay, sand bags or expanding foam. Each of these materials and indeed the breaker strategy can have environmental impacts. http://huckbody.com/?page_id=1088 Trench breakers prevent gullying erosion while trench is open and inhibit water piping and water blowouts down the course of the pipeline after backfilling http://www.agriculture.ny.gov/ap/agservices/Pipeline-Drawings.pdf http://wiki.iploca.com/display/rtswiki/Appendix+6.2+-+Pipeline+Trench+Design

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Ditch Breaker

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Ditch Breaker http://wiki.iploca.com/display/rtswiki/Appendix+6.2+-+Pipeline+Trench+Design

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Ditch Breaker

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Ditching http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-t9yqWgGpg

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Ditching / Trenching http://vimeo.com/81055781

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.4 Open Ditch Restrictions Inspectors should monitor the distance between the front end of ditching and the back end (backfill) and the amount of open ditch allowed by construction specifications (e.g. 2 miles or less during daylight hours and 1/2 mile at night). 7.6.5 Foreign Line and Other Structure Crossings Inspectors need to ensure that care and attentiveness is used in crossing foreign lines, including pipelines, other utilities, and farmland drainage systems. Inspectors also need to ensure that the space between the new pipeline and other existing structures is in accordance with specifications (usually 12 in. to 24 in.) and that acceptable temporary installations are used and are suitable for the service required. (See 49 CFR 192.325 and 195.250.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.6 Soil Characteristics 7.6.6.1 General Inspectors should have knowledge of OSHA 1926 Subpart P to ensure ditching/excavation safety and specifically to address the threat of cave-in. 7.6.6.2 Soil Analysis Inspectors should have an understanding of proper analysis of the types of soil encountered, including moisture content, compaction, angle of repose, and relative stability, and should know who is the project’s competent person(s) for soil assessments. 7.6.6.3 Ditch Sloping or Other Ditch Configurations Inspectors should be aware of ditch depth/width configurations and the ditch proximity to equipment movement/ operation relative to the type of soil involved.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.7 Shoring Requirements Inspectors should check use of trench boxes, bracing, and other ditch shoring requirements and adequacy of documentation evidencing certification of the devices. Inspectors need to be knowledgeable in the use of and restrictions of shoring and bracing when it is required. (See OSHA 1926.652.) 7.6.8 Rock Excavation Requirements Inspectors must know proper ditching and excavation procedures in rocky terrain to ensure the safety of personnel and proper placement and protection of the pipeline. Inspectors should check, measure, document, and report, when necessary, rock excavation. In rock excavation, owner/operators typically prefer use of mechanized equipment, such as track mounted rippers, pavement breakers, specially equipped track hoes, or ditching machines to cut through, break up, and remove rock.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Inspectors should able to perform the following: observe and assess the equipment being used as to size, type, condition and effectiveness, and limitations; ensure that depth specifications are met and accurate measurements are performed to ascertain any extra work authorization or to account for any special bid pricing.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Rock Excavation

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Shoring

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Shoring

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.9 Drilling and Blasting Inspectors should understand the basics of this process, but specialized training and experience is often needed to inspect these activities (see Annex B). Blasting activities that should be monitored include (see OSHA 1926.900 to 1926.914): checking permits, notifications, and warning signage; competency of personnel; charge placement procedures; amount of explosive used per blast; precautions around structures; charge padding (soil or blast mats) to avoid excessive heaving or debris scatter; adherence to owner/operator specifications; presence of a blasting plan.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Drilling & Blasting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Drilling & Blasting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Drilling & Blasting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.6.10 HDD Requirements Inspectors should know the basic process and requirements of HDD, but it is advisable to utilize an inspector with specialized training and experience in this facet of construction (see Annex C). The following HDD activities should be monitored: HDD equipment size, type, condition, and suitability for the job; competence and proficiency of equipment operators and their supervision; drilling follows the specified profile, alignment, tolerances, and entry/exit locations; reaming, pull back procedures, and equipment and pipe string layout follow industry practice and specifications; use, containment, and disposal of drilling mud follow accepted practices; inadvertent returns of the drilling mud to the surface.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD Mud System

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Horizontal Direction Drilling- HDD

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Specialized training and experience is often needed: Drilling & Blasting Operations HDD Operations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.7 Pipe Handling, Hauling, and Stringing Operations Inspectors should monitor, assess, and document the condition of the pipe in each phase below (see API 5L1, API 5LT, API 5LW, ASME B31.4 Section 434.5, ASME B31.8 Section 806, and 49 CFR 192.309). Inspectors should be knowledgeable of work activities involved in moving pipe: the type and condition of equipment used, such as fabric slings, padded calipers, soft lift hooks, and other approved lifting devices; boom height versus surrounding structures, such as power lines; stacking procedures (number of tiers and padding); and other precautionary steps to protect the pipe and any coating. (See ASME B31.4 Section 434.4.) Inspectors should complete pipe tallies; check mill certifications, heat numbers, and mill test reports; and note pipe marking on received pipe at rail heads, docks, or other receipt locations to facilitate proper tracking and documentation and to ensure correct placement by wall thickness, grade, and coating.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Inspectors should observe and note pipe and coating condition, including bevels, presence of dents, gouges, scratches, notches, grooves, or other defects, and report noted damage along with measurements of size and extent of any damage and its location. Reports of damage should be made in accordance with owner/operator procedures. Inspectors should check locations of required gaps or spaces in strung pipe, where needed, to allow passage of equipment, vehicles, personnel, and livestock and at foreign utility crossings, if required. Inspectors should check pipe handling and placement during stringing to minimize damage, document any assessed damage, and that ensure strung pipe is not in harm’s way from ongoing construction activities and that stringing enables a smooth pipe laying progress.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z_66e-JWAU

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing http://www.lcs-cablecranes.com/projects/e-on-ruhrgas-lauterbach-project/#.VBoDqtyH42Q

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Clearing, Grubbing, and Grading

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Stringing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.8 Piping Components, Materials, and Other Mainline Appurtenances Inspectors should verify materials meet job specifications, including but not limited to bills of materials and drawings, check mill test reports, certification records, and markings; match components with specifications to ensure suitability for the intended service; and know what to look for when visually inspecting these components, marking deficiencies and recording findings. These major components include the following: Inspectors should check the condition of flanges, fittings, bolts/nuts, gaskets, and other fittings. Check ANSI ratings, flange bores and transition nipples, component condition, bevels, markings, and adequacy of supplies to ensure they are in accordance with job specifications and drawings (see 49 CFR 195.206, ANSI B16.5, ANSI B16.9, ANSI B16.20, ANSI B16.21, and ANSI B16.47).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Inspectors should check the following for valves: ANSI ratings, overall condition, trim, coating, operability, flange faces and/or bevels, and body condition to ensure they meet specifications and are suitable for installation in the pipeline (see API 6D, ASME B31.4 Section 434.15, 49 CFR 195.258, and 49 CFR 195.260). Inspectors should check the condition of hot bends (manufactured bends): check bend angles, bend radius, markings, ovality, bevels, coating, and overall condition to ensure they meet specifications. Inspectors should check condition of other appurtenances, such as scraper traps, pump station mainline fittings and valves, and other components to be installed in the mainline, to ensure acceptability for installation (see ASME B31.4 Section 434.17).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Piping Components : Induction Bend http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SgTEtSo52k

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.9 Pipe Bending Operations Inspectors should ensure that owner/operator specifications are adhered to and the following areas are checked during field pipe bending: produced bends meet specified angle requirements, meets minimum bend radius requirements, ovality and wall thinning is within specified limits, bends have a smooth contour, pipe seam location restrictions, if any, are correct, and any restrictions due to pipe grade have been met. Inspectors should note damage to coating, pipe wall, and bevels and mark, record, and report any damage or out of specification bends. (See 49 CFR 192.313, 49 CFR 195.212, and ASME B31.4 Sections 434.7 and 434.7.3.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Bender

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Bender

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Bender

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Bender

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Straight Pipes & Bends

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Recommended practice for basic inspection requirements – new pipeline construction API RP 2014-September My Self Study Exam Preparatory Notes- Part 3

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.10 Pipe Alignment and Welding Requirements 7.10.1 General Since this phase of pipeline construction, both on production and tie-ins, is critically important to the long-term integrity of the pipeline, all inspectors should know the basics of proper lineup and welding and its inspection. Qualified welding inspectors with specialized training and experience would be expected to know more in depth inspection requirements (see Annex D). All mainline pipeline welding, whether manual or automatic, follow the same codes, standards, industry practices, and specification parameters.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.10.2 Pipe Laying Operation Inspectors should check the following per specifications and drawings; ensure pup joints meet specified minimum length restrictions consistent with pipe diameter and owner/operator requirements; for proper installation/placement of transition nipples for changes in pipe wall thickness; for proper location/placement of the correct type, grade, and wall thickness of pipe and other mainline appurtenances, such as hot bends, block valves, scraper traps, any pump station piping, and other fabrications per drawings. Mark changes (red line) on drawings to facilitate completion of as-built drawings.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.10.3 Mainline Component Assembly Inspectors should be knowledgeable in the following areas of mainline component assembly: bolting procedures, including but not limited to: proper bolt/nut size and condition, placement, tightening sequence, torque requirements, and use of correct tools; proper gasket material and use; installation and isolation testing of any insulating flanges; verify that all concrete support structures are constructed in accordance with American Concrete Institute (ACI) standards and owner/operator requirements; ensure proper coating and application requirements are met for the component being installed.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.10.4 Other Pipe Laying Inspections Inspectors should ensure open pipeline is protected with night caps or other devices to keep debris, water, and wildlife out of the welded up pipeline.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Pipe Alignment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Pipe Alignment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Pipe Alignment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Pipe Alignment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Pipe Alignment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Preheating

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Preheating

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding (Root/Hot pass station & Fill/Cap Station)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding (Root/Hot pass station & Fill/Cap Station)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding (Root/Hot pass station & Fill/Cap Station) www.youtube.com/embed/f2tRO0-_xIo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2tRO0-_xIo

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Main Spread- Welding Stations

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Night Cap

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Mainline Welding- Hot Pass www.youtube.com/embed/u_EzniXp3-A

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Following are Tie-In Welding, Repair Welding, Metering Station and Appurtenances Welding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Tie-In Welding, Repair Welding, Metering Station and Appurtenances Welding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Tie-In Joint

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Tie-In Joint

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Tie-In Joint

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Metering Station Welding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Root Repairs

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.11 Roadway, Railroad, and Other Crossings 7.11.1 General Inspectors should monitor, assess, and verify the activities and requirements in the following sections to ensure compliance with regulations, permits, industry practice, and owner/operator specifications (see API 1102 Sections 4, 5, and 6; ASME B31.4 Sections 434.13, 434.13.1, 434.13.2, 434.13.3, and 434.13.4; and ASME B31.8 Sections 802.2.5, 806, and 841.2.2). 7.11.2 Safety Inspectors should ensure safety precautions are in place, including markers, signs, traffic control devices, and other related activities, including flagmen, as required, near pipe laying operations, excavations, and other locations, especially where machinery and trucks are operating and other construction activity is taking place. 7.11.3 Permits Inspectors should be knowledgeable of different types of crossing permits, their provisions, and the governmental agency issuing the permit(s) (e.g. state and county road and city street crossing permits and railroad crossing permits).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.11.4 Installation Activities Inspectors should be knowledgeable of installation methods, machinery/equipment condition, and operator performance involved in completing the crossing, including wet or dry boring, HDD, ditching, or other approved method. ensure that the pipe has been surveyed and proper documentation collected prior to installation and that tie-in points had been surveyed after installation.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang River Crossing – HDD Pull Head

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang River Crossing – HDD Pull Head

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.11.5 Cased Crossings Inspectors should be knowledgeable of cased crossings: casing installation methods, equipment used, operator performance, and completeness/acceptability, including the correct pipe, wall thickness, and coating, if any, versus specifications (see 49 CFR 192.323 and 49 CFR 195); mainline welding is inspected and acceptable along with the pipe coating and/or pipe jacketing; verify that mainline pipe insertion procedures are followed to ensure that no damage occurs to pipe and its coating, visually inspect spacers/insulators during and after installation, and check installation of seals and vents; verification that the completed cased crossing is not electrically shorted and testing methods are correct, that depth profile specifications are met, and the required documentation is completed.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Cased Crossing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Cased Crossing Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.11.6 Uncased Crossings Inspectors should be knowledgeable of uncased crossings: method of crossing (boring, HDD, ditching, or other approved methods), equipment used, and operator performance, including use of heavier wall pipe and special coating, if required, is in accordance with drawings, specifications, and permit provisions; mainline welding is inspected and acceptable along with coating and/or jacket condition after insertion of the pipe; mainline crossing pipe on each side is ready for tie-in. 7.11.7 Documentation Inspectors must make sure that all required documentation, including permits, owner/operator records and requirements for marked-up drawings as needed, and any special provisions in permits, such as railroad, highway, and local or other permit requirements, are completed.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HDD- Horizontal Directional Drilling Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoG8rNCO_Dk

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.12 Waterway and Water Body Crossings 7.12.1 General Inspectors should monitor, assess, and verify the following activities and requirements to ensure compliance with codes, regulations, permits, industry practices, and specifications. These crossings may include swamp, wetland, river, lake, and similar water feature crossings. (See ASME B31.4 Section 434.13.4.) 7.12.2 Other Types of Crossings Inspectors should monitor and inspect overhead crossings, such as spans and bridge attachments that should be inspected to ensure compliance with specifications, drawings, and permit provisions (see ASME B31.4 Sections 434.13.2 and 434.13.3). 7.12.3 Precautions Inspectors should be knowledgeable of safety and environmental precautions, including equipment used, excavations, markers/signs, waterway traffic, if any, pipe laying operations, and minimization of environment damage.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang River Crossing- Open Ditch Note the concrete coating and piggy back smaller tube underneath the main pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang River Crossing- Open Ditch

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang River Crossing- Open Ditch

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore http://www.coluccio.com/services/tunnels-microtunnels/jack-bore-tunneling/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Rotary

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore http://www.thiess.com.au/projects/the-narrows-marine-crossing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing – Rotary

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Road & Rail Crossing - Jack & Bore

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.12.4 Permits Inspectors should be knowledgeable of different types of crossing permits, their provisions, and the governmental authority with oversight over the permit. For example, most major water crossings must be permitted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with their NWP12 permit. 7.12.5 Survey Requirements Inspectors should ensure compliance with survey requirements as to alignment and depth, including how these requirements are determined, verified, and accepted in accordance with specifications and drawings. 7.12.6 Installation Activities Inspectors should make sure that the use of accepted/specified pipe installation methods, bank stabilization and restoration methods, extra ROW requirements, buoyancy control, heavy wall thickness pipe, and installation and/or use of concrete jacketed pipe comply with permit provisions and specifications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.12.7 Positioning and Buoyancy Inspectors should verify that crossing pipe position and stability is in accordance with owner operator specifications, especially negative buoyancy requirements to prevent flotation. 7.12.8 Documentation Inspectors should ensure that all required documentation, including pipe details, permits, and owner/operator records and markup drawings to reflect as-built conditions, are completed.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.13 Corrosion Control Requirements 7.13.1 General Inspectors should have a basic knowledge of corrosion control, including pipe coating and cathodic protection (CP). Qualified/certified corrosion control coating inspectors with specialized training and experience would be expected to know more in depth inspection requirements (see Annex E). 7.13.2 Cathodic Protection Test Lead Requirements Inspectors should make sure that all test leads for CP monitoring are attached to the pipeline with a low temperature welding process, such as cadweld. The welds and bare wires should be properly coated with properly applied, specified coating, and lead wires should have ample slack between the pipe and aboveground test stations to prevent damage. Leads, test station installations, and lead wire terminations should follow job specifications. Adequate testing, usually by a corrosion control specialist, should be performed to ensure these installations are functioning properly.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.13.3 Above ground/ Below ground Coating Requirements Inspectors should be aware of the requirements for surface preparation and application methods (see SSPC Volume 1). 7.13.4 Final Coating Inspection Inspectors should monitor, assess, and take corrective action where necessary for all coated pipe to ensure it is inspected immediately before lowering in with a holiday detector that has an output consistent with NACE recommended voltage for the type of coating and thickness being inspected. Inspectors should verify the detector setting at least twice per day . Inspectors must make certain all coating anomalies or damaged areas are marked and properly repaired per manufacturer’s recommendations and job specifications before the pipe is allowed to be lowered into the ditch.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- 3LPE

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- FBE

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- Spray Application

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- Spray Application

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- LPE Site Wrap

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Heat Shrink Sleeve

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Heat Shrink Sleeve

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Heat Shrink Sleeve

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Heat Shrink Sleeve

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Heat Shrink Sleeve

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Surface Preparation http://failheap-challenge.com/showthread.php?11614-Offshore-pics

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Induction Heating

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - FBE Coating Application

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - FBE Coating Application

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - FBE Coating

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - FBE Coating

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Polyurethane injection molding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Polyurethane injection molding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Polyurethane injection molding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Joint - Polyurethane injection molding

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Holiday Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Holiday Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Holiday Testing

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- Melt Stick Repair Kits http://www.proline-global.com/OurProducts/CoatingProducts/CanusaMeltStick.aspx

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Coated Pipe- Melt Sticks

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.14 Lowering in Requirements 7.14.1 General Inspectors should monitor, assess, and take corrective action where necessary in the following areas prior to and during installation of the pipe in the ditch (see 49 CFR 192.319, 49 CFR 195.246, and ASME B31.4 Section 434.10). 7.14.2 Condition of Bottom of the Ditch Inspectors should ensure that there is no water, rocks, hard clods, roots, or other debris in the ditch and that any padding material or rock shield is in place. Lower the line with proper slack in the line so it fits the profile of the ditch (i.e. sags and over-bends are properly positioned to prevent pushing the pipeline ahead of the lowering in process).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.14.3 Lifting and Lower Equipment Inspectors should monitor, assess, and take corrective action, where necessary, for: slings, padded calipers, rollers, and other pipe carrying devices to prevent coating or pipe damage and assess the suitability of lifting machines as to size, type, and condition. Inspectors should review the design considerations in the lowering in plan and the equipment spacing and maximum lifting height to prevent excessive stresses. 7.14.4 Erosion Control Inspectors should check that ditch plugs, sack breakers, retards, and water diversion features are in place and built in accordance with specifications to prevent washouts. 7.14.5 Land Drains Inspectors should check to ensure land drainage reinstallation is correct and in agreement with specifications

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Question? Why the “Land Drains” item appear in the Lowering activities? 7.14.5 Land Drains Inspectors should check to ensure land drainage reinstallation is correct and in agreement with specifications

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Lowering

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Expert at Works

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Expert at Works

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipe Lowering-in Video https://www.youtube.com/embed/PdKK7Khf5bw

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.15 Backfill and Cleanup Requirements Inspectors should monitor, assess, and take corrective action as needed in the following areas during backfill operations to prevent damage to the pipe and/or its coating and ensure support is provided under the pipe (see 49 CFR 192.327, 49 CFR 195.248, 49 CFR 195.252, and ASME B31.4 Section 434.11). Inspectors should check suitability of backfill material (no rocks or other hard objects to be placed on the pipe) and equipment used for backfilling and ensure the pipe is properly supported and padded (see 49 CFR 192.319). The inspector must also ensure that owner/operator specifications are met. Inspectors should verify depth requirements as stipulated for each location and type of terrain in accordance with 49 CFR 195.248, 49 CFR 192.327, and the job specifications. Inspectors should ensure compaction meets job specifications and settlement is considered for the ditch cover, including water pack requirements.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Inspectors should check rock shield or other soft earth padding (at least 12-in. thick) is in place in rocky terrain in accordance with job specifications. Inspectors should monitor the following cleanup operations that involve restoring the land to it’s agreed upon condition prior to construction: removal of waste materials, rocks, and other debris resulting from construction; repair all damaged land by filling holes, ruts, and other land disturbances; plow, disc, or drag ROW to dress the land and remediate excessively compacted areas, especially in cultivated areas; remove temporary structures and ROW access roads/trails per agreed upon requirements; repair fences with new posts, braces, and fencing material and tighten to satisfy landowner expectations;

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang ensure that proper seeding, where required, has been applied in accordance with design and permit conditions and/or the landowner agreements; check that pipeline warning markers, milepost and aerial markers, and river crossing signs are placed and installed in accordance with drawings, specifications, and API 1109 (see 49 CFR 195.410 and ASME B31.4 Section 434.18).

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Backfilling

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Expert at works

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Reinstatement

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.16 Pipeline Cleaning Requirements Inspectors should monitor the areas below in the use of pipeline cleaning devices. Inspectors should check launching and receiving traps for proper configuration and suitability for the operation, including pressure relief provisions and mainline valve positioning. Inspectors should ensure cleaning devices are constructed per specifications to properly gauge the internal condition of the new pipeline. Inspectors should monitor cleaning device location and speed. Inspectors should be knowledgeable in cases of damage to the gauging plate, if a swab becomes stuck, or anomalies are indicated by other devices. Such defects or obstructions must be located and repaired in accordance with job specifications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Cleaning & Gauging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Temporary Launcher & Receiver Equipment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Launcher & Receiver Equipment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Cleaning & Gauging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Cleaning & Gauging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Cleaning & Gauging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Cleaning & Gauging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Cleaning & Gauging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.17 Internal Line Inspection Requirements Inspectors should be knowledgeable of owner/operator requirements for internal line inspection. Owner/operators often run internal line inspection devices following construction to establish their baseline assessments as part of their integrity management programs. Inspectors should monitor the following areas when these devices are used (see 49 CFR 195.450 to 195.452). Inspectors should check launching and receiving facilities for proper configuration and suitability for using these inspection tools, including pressure relief provisions and mainline block valve positioning. Inspectors should be knowledgeable of tool run activities and monitor tool run activities. If the inspection device becomes lodged in the pipeline, coordinate activities with contractors in order to locate the tool, perform extraction work, and make pipeline repairs.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Gauging & Monitoring https://www.nord-stream.com/press-info/images/arrival-of-the-inline-inspection-tool-in-lubmin-3505/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Gauging & Monitoring https://www.nord-stream.com/press-info/images/arrival-of-the-inline-inspection-tool-in-lubmin-3505/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Gauging & Monitoring https://www.nord-stream.com/press-info/images/arrival-of-the-inline-inspection-tool-in-lubmin-3505/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Gauging & Monitoring

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Intelligence Pigging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Intelligence Pigging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Intelligence Pigging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.18 Hydrostatic Pressure Testing Requirements 7.18.1 General Inspectors should be knowledgeable of API 1110 provisions, 49 CFR 192 Subpart J, and 49 CFR 195 Subpart E. Ensure the owner/operator test plan is implemented and then monitor, assess, and report on the hydrostatic pressure testing process steps listed below (see also ASME B31.4 Chapter VI). 7.18.2 Permit Requirements Inspectors should review permits, if any, to obtain test water from local sources (i.e. municipal, river, streams, or other sources) and plans to treat test water (filtration, chemical treatment, or use of other conditioning means) to ensure specified quality before it enters the new pipeline. Review disposal plans and requirements following test completion to ensure that the discharged water meets permit and/or specified quality parameters.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Water Quality Check- H2S Test Kit

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Water Quality Check- H2S Test Kit

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.18.3 Check Test Equipment Inspectors should check the following to ensure that the test equipment is compatible with testing requirements. Filling equipment condition and suitability for service (e.g. high volume, low pressure pumping equipment, piping, scrapers, and test manifold and blinds and/or plugs are in place on all side connections and other small piping not to be included in the mainline test). Test equipment, including low volume, high pressure pump, dead weight tester, thermometers, recording instruments, associated piping, and other appurtenances to ensure all equipment is properly connected and suitable for the test. All test equipment must meet industry calibration standards.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Hydrotesting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Hydrotesting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Hydrotesting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Hydrotesting http://joyce-road.blogspot.com/2012/05/pipeline-construction_19.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Hydrotesting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline Hydrotesting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.18.4 Conduct of the Test As required by owner/operator, inspectors should observe the performance of the test and verify the results, report any temperature/pressure variations, and verify test report completeness. Owner/operator defines roles of the inspectors in regards to the witnessing, sign off on, and recording the completed test plan. Test reports should include: company name, testing company, and person responsible ; date and time of test; description of facility tested; test medium; deadweight tester and gauge certification including unique identifiers (serial numbers); temperature/pressure records including unique identifiers (serial numbers); minimum test pressure;

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang weather conditions and explanation of any pressure deviations or other pressure discontinuities; records of any failures and repairs; PV plots; unique test identifier (i.e. test number); duration of the test.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.18.5 Precautions During the Test Inspectors should confirm safety precautions are in place to protect against hazards, such as sudden unexpected pressure release from piping and/or appurtenances under test. 7.18.6 Test Documentation Inspectors should review, report, and document any failures and subsequent repairs. Confirm and acknowledge the test plan. 7.18.7 Displacement Activities Inspectors should check displacement methods (usually with nitrogen or air) and disposal of test medium in accordance with permits and job specifications and removal of blinds/plugs and open valves to prepare the line for commissioning the completed pipeline.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Displacement Activities Removal of testing medium (s)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.19 Commissioning Requirements Inspectors should monitor purging/cleaning practices, ensure safe disconnection procedures are followed, check dew point (moisture in the line) as necessary, following dewatering/dehydration activities, and ensure owner/operator commissioning procedures are followed.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Commissioning: Humidity Check Dew Point Tester

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Commissioning: Nitrogen Purging

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Commissioning: Purging Principles & Practices https://law.resource.org/pub/us/cfr/ibr/001/aga.purging.2001.pdf

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.20 Documentation Requirements Inspectors are expected to complete all documents required by 49 CFR 195.266 or 49 CFR 192 and owner/operator requirements, including but not limited to: daily logs/reports; extra work memoranda; work shutdown/move around reports; completion of paperwork requirements of permits to close them out; drawing markups for as-built records, including location of crossing pipelines and other utilities, valves, CP units, test station locations, and other connections installed in the new pipeline; amount, size, wall thickness, grade, heat number, other pipe nomenclature and coating of pipe laid, its location, and depth of cover; number of welds, welds tested, rejection rates, and repairs made; weld logs to include weld numbers and unique identifiers (i.e. pipeline number); as-built surveys to include weld identifiers, location, depth of pipe, and other information per the owner/operator specifications; hydrostatic tests and any test failures.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 7.21 Inspector Tools for Communication and Documentation Requirements Inspectors should be able to competently use the following tools and devices to aid in communication, recording data, and recordkeeping for safety/hazard observations, construction problems, logs, and other required records and documentation, including but not limited to: laptop computer, radios, GPS devices, digital cameras, air cards (for internet access), mobile devices.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Annexes

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Annex A (normative) Chief Inspector A.1 Scope Individuals assigned as chief inspectors are typically highly skilled and experienced in pipeline construction and have served in a number of different inspection classifications. Chief inspectors must be capable of managing, directing, and overseeing all pipeline construction inspection personnel involved in each construction activity, including: welding inspectors, corrosion control inspectors, utility inspectors, and specialized inspectors, such as blasting and HDD. Chief inspectors usually report to an owner/operator project manager or other management personnel charged with completing a pipeline project.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2 Qualifications A.2.1 General Chief inspectors must be knowledgeable in each of the major requirement areas of pipeline construction. The basic requirements are detailed herein and include: pipeline construction inspector responsibilities, personnel and general pipeline safety, environmental and pollution control, general construction inspection.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.2 Special Inspection Requirements Chief inspectors must have in depth knowledge of welding inspection, corrosion control inspection, and specialty inspection, such as blasting, HDD, and other specialty inspection that may be required by the project. A.2.3 Other Knowledge and Skill Requirements A.2.3.1 Principles of Project Management Project management is responsible for designing and constructing a safe, maintainable facility that operates efficiently within design conditions, complies with laws, regulations, and industry standards, and is completed on time and within budget. Chief inspectors must be knowledgeable and capable of implementing this management process, which includes, but is not limited to: understanding project objectives, staffing and supervising the inspection organization, contract administration, planning and scheduling tasks, controlling costs, measuring and controlling job progress, managing quality assurance, and completing documentation requirements, all within the requirements of the owner/operator.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.3.2 Fundamentals of Project Accounting Chief inspectors must understand proper pipeline accounting requirements, including but not limited to: receipt of materials/supplies, verification of materials versus specifications, capital and operating expense booking processes, and timely communication with the accounting staff using the proper forms and procedures. A.2.3.3 Contract Administration Chief inspectors must be knowledgeable about the details of the contract governing the assigned project, including but not limited to: contract performance provisions, each parties’ contractual obligations, terms and conditions, terminology, restrictions, bid and extra work provisions, and contract dispute resolution processes.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang A.2.3.4 Project Materials Tracking/Traceability Chief inspectors must be familiar with the processes and procedures used in supply management systems, including but not limited to: tracking and tracing materials and supplies using identifiers, such as serial numbers, mill numbers, and heat numbers, verifying adherence to specifications, and resolving delivery timing issues and their influence on job progress. A.2.3.5 Elements of Public Relations Chief inspectors must have experience and training in how to deal openly and honestly with the general public, including landowners, regulatory and law enforcement officials, mass media representatives, and other individuals who may interface with the project construction. Inspectors should also know owner/operator requirements as to what is pertinent and appropriate in providing information, answering questions, and resolving issues

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Annex B (normative) Blasting Inspector B.1 Scope Individuals assigned as blasting inspectors are recognized as specialists in this activity and typically have additional schooling from explosive suppliers and other sources or have gained experience while actively involved in the use of explosives. Inspectors assigned to blasting operations report to the chief inspector and may handle other inspection duties depending on their training and experience. B.2 Qualifications B.2.1 General Blasting inspectors should be knowledgeable of the basic requirements included in API 1169 and be knowledgeable in the following areas related to use of explosives and pipeline construction blasting operations.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang B.2.2 Transportation, Handling, and Storage of Explosives Inspectors should be familiar with OSHA and DOT regulations as to the safe movement, storage, and handling of explosives (see OSHA 1910.109, OSHA 1926.900 to 1926.914, and 49 CFR 177). B.2.3 Blasting Plan Inspectors must be familiar with the contractor’s blasting plan and ensure all safety precautions are implemented per the plan. B.2.4 Permit Inspectors should be knowledgeable of pertinent permits and their issuing agencies and ensure the provisions of the permits are properly addressed by the contractor. B.2.5 Safety Precautions Inspectors must be knowledgeable of safety precautions to be taken during blasting operations, including but not limited to: notifications, warning signage, use of two-way radios, barriers, and safe distance parameters from the blast zone.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang B.2.6 Blasting Preparation Inspectors must be familiar with charge placement drilling operations, including configurations and depth of charge holes, charge placement procedures, charge padding activities using earth or blast mats, proper fusing techniques, use of correct wiring, and blasting machines, and ensure each of these activities follow accepted practices and owner/operator procedures. B.2.7 Blasting Inspectors should monitor the results of the blasting to ensure its effectiveness and measure and record, if required, the area blasted in the event of extra work authorization or special bid pricing. B.2.8 Cleanup Inspectors should monitor cleanup activities to ensure minimal collateral damage (Unintended damage) for excess heaving or debris scatter.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Annex C (normative) Horizontal Directional Drilling Inspector C.1 Scope Individuals assigned to carry out the inspection duties related to horizontal directional drilling (HDD) are recognized as specialists due to the nature and complexity of these operations. Thorough monitoring and documentation by qualified inspection personnel is crucial since a drilled installation is typically buried with deep cover under inaccessible terrain or infrastructure features and its installed condition cannot be verified by visual examination. HDD inspectors will usually have completed training provided by HDD contractors or other sources and they have experience in this crossing methodology. HDD inspectors report to the chief inspector and may handle other inspection duties as directed by the chief inspector.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang C.2 Qualifications C.2.1 General HDD inspectors should be knowledgeable of the basic inspection requirements included herein and be knowledgeable about the characteristics, features, and work performance activities of HDD operations, including but not limited to the following: drill path, pilot hole, downhole survey systems/surface - tracking systems, course length, inclination, azimuth, stationing, elevation, entry/exit angles, radius of curvature, pull section, reaming, buoyancy control, coating integrity, drilling fluid, documentation requirements.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang C.2.2 Construction Staking and Marking Inspector should be familiar with staking and marking of the drilled segment, particularly the entry and exit points, including the distance between the points, their elevations, and how each of these is determined. Inspector should understand the importance of these accurately located points that provide a benchmark for the down-hole survey and the orientation of the survey measuring instruments. C.2.3 HDD Equipment Inspector should be familiar with HDD equipment of various sizes and types suitable for different jobs, machinery condition, and suitability for the intended work. C.2.4 HDD Personnel Inspector should observe the functioning of the HDD equipment operating personnel and their supervision as to their competence and proficiency and how they handle the HDD equipment and its associated gear, including the surface monitoring system used to determine the downhole probe location.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang C.2.5 Drilled Path Inspectors should monitor the drilled path during pilot hole drilling and assess if the drilling is on the proper inclination and azimuth to ensure the vertical and horizontal positioning, including the drilled length, depth of cover, and entry/ exit angles required by the owner/operator specifications. Inspectors should also assess if the exit location is within limits set forth by the specifications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang C.2.6 Pipe Installation C.2.6.1 General Inspector should review the pipe installation operation to ensure owner/operator specifications are met, including the following. C.2.6.2 Pull Section Inspector should ensure that the welds, pipe, and joint coating of the carrier pipe string to be pulled into the drilled crossing have been properly inspected and the pull section is ready for placement. C.2.6.3 Reaming Inspector should be knowledgeable of the equipment and its appurtenances used to enlarge the drill hole to accommodate the pull back operation and be able to assess the effectiveness of this operation.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang C.2.6.4 Pull Section Handling Inspector should monitor and assess the adequacy of support of the pull section during pull back. Roller stands or other support mechanisms as well as the lifting equipment should be checked to ensure satisfactory movement of the pipe string into its drilled crossing. C.2.6.5 Buoyancy Control Inspector should be knowledgeable of buoyancy control processes that may be used to lessen pulling loads. C.2.6.6 Pipe Coating Inspector should ensure the pipe coating is inspected with a properly calibrated holiday detector just prior to the pipe entering the reamed drill hole and that any needed coating repairs meet owner/operator specifications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang C.2.7 Drilling Fluid Inspector should be familiar with types of drilling mud and its proper use, monitor the ROW for potential drilling mud migration or intrusion, and ensure the containment and disposal of the drilling mud follow accepted procedures. C.2.8 Documentation Inspector should understand requirements established by the owner/operator and any permitting agencies and complete needed documentation in a timely and complete manner.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Annex D (normative) Welding Inspector D.1 Scope Individuals assigned as welding inspectors shall be qualified as welding inspectors to ensure the inspection of this critical activity is carried out in strict accordance with codes, regulations, and owner/operator specifications. Qualification and certification in this function requires additional schooling and usually a significant amount of on the job experience. Welding inspectors report to the chief inspector and may function as backup for the chief .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Guinean Chief

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Red Indian Chief

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Guinea military Chief

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Chief: Ethiopia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haile_Selassie_I_of_Ethiopia

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Chief: Colonel Gaddafi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muammar_Gaddafi

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Chief of Havana: Fidel Castro http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fidel_Castro

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Chief : Che Guevara http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Che_Guevara_in_popular_culture

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2 Qualifications D.2.1 General Welding inspectors should be knowledgeable of the basic requirements included in API 1169, have completed training in API 1104, AWS, or other industry welding schooling, and be skilled in the following areas related to pipeline welding. D.2.2 Certification and Qualification Verification The welding inspectors should be familiar with both welder and NDT technician qualification and certification documentation provided by the contractor or individual and be capable of verifying the documents’ authenticity. Any AWS certifications should be carefully reviewed to ensure they cover pipeline welding and not an unrelated type welding such as structural steel welding.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: Welding Inspector Qualifications Any AWS certifications should be carefully reviewed to ensure they cover pipeline welding and not an unrelated type welding such as structural steel welding.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Certified Expert at Works

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Structural Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Pipeline Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Pipeline Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The Pipeline Welding Inspector

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2.3 Testing Welders All mainline pipeline welding strictly follows owner/operator approved and qualified welding procedures, which consistently produces sound welds with correct mechanical properties and meet the requirements of API 1104. Every welder, welding on the pipeline, must be tested and qualified by making an acceptable weld using the approved/ qualified procedure to be used in the construction. The welding inspectors must be capable of monitoring and assessing these tests and the determining acceptability of the welds by visual examination, NDT, and destructive testing using the standards of acceptability in API 1104. Inspectors ensure that each welder passing the qualification test is issued and uses an identification number to identify his welds during construction.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Experts at Work

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Experts at Works

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Experts at Works

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2.4 Welding Equipment Inspectors check the following for compliance with welding procedures and specifications: suitability of welding machines (minimum 200 amp NEMA rating), electrode holders, grounding clamps, and cables and their proper use; welding rod, including AWS classification and size; storage/handling procedures for welding rod and other welding supplies; other equipment, such as cutting/beveling machines, any preheat equipment, brushes, and grinders.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2.5 Alignment of Pipe for Welding Inspectors monitor the following pipe gang and line up activities: Swabbing of the pipe before fit up to remove foreign debris and/or wildlife. Pipe gang proficiency to ensure proper handling, fit up, and bevel alignment. Clamping procedures and proper support of pipe during and after welding, including padded skids for coated pipe. Clamp Holding time—100 % of stringer bead for internal line up clamps (larger that 6-in. O.D. pipe). Check specifications for permissible use of external line up clamps and holding times on smaller diameter pipe and at tie-ins. Seam alignment, if any, to ensure pipe seams are rolled off top center per specifications, Potential magnetism [near high voltage alternating current (HVAC) lines or where there is evidence of residual magnetism] that could adversely affect welding (arc blow) and take steps to degauss the pipe. (If the pipe is being laid under HVAC lines, verify that the pipe section is grounded.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Keywords: pipe gang line up activities proper support of pipe during and after welding padded skids

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Alignment of Pipe

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang HT Transmission Tower

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Gauss Meter

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Gauss Meter

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang External Clamp

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Internal Clamp

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Internal Clamp Alignment

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Internal Clamp

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Internal Clamp

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Effects of High Voltage Transmission Lines on Humans and Plants Hear what the Expert said; http://electricalnotes.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/effects-of-high-voltage-transmission-lines-on-humans-and-plants/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Transmission Line EMF Interference with Buried Pipeline: Essential & Cautions M. H. Shwehdi and U. M. Johar Electrical Engineering Department at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia http://www.who.int/peh-emf/meetings/archive/en/paper02shwehdi.pdf

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Electromagnetic Induction in Pipelines Due to Overhead High Voltage Power Lines E. Sawma, B. Zeitoun, N. Harmouche, S. Georges and M. Hamad Department of Electrical and Computer and Communication Engineering 2010 International Conference on Power System Technology http://joa.csee.org.cn/Public/DownloadFile.aspx?FileStorageId=b5068437-d5f6-4735-b086-829939491be9

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2.6 Welding Inspection Inspectors must carry out their responsibilities in the areas below to ensure compliance with specifications and standards (see AWS manual, API 1104, and ASME B31.4 Section 434.8). Inspectors should: have a copy of the qualified welding procedure readily available and the qualification papers of qualified welders and verify that proper welding procedures are being consistently followed; visually inspect each weld and observe welder technique/performance including smoothness of metal application, rod travel speed, starts/stops, and welder identification; verify that NDT contractor has provided written NDT procedures for all processes and performs in accordance with those procedures, and verify NDT of welds is in accordance with industry standards and regulations (Regulations require 10 % coverage, but generally, owner/operators inspect 100 % of all welds with suitable NDT.);

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang evaluate weld quality by reviewing NDT results; noting defective welds, rejection rates, and repairable/ nonrepairable (cutouts) welds versus standards of acceptability contained in API 1104 and owner/operator specifications; marking any unacceptable welds for repair or cutout, and noting which welder or welders made the unacceptable welds.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2.7 Weld Repairs/Replacement Inspectors inspect any repairs in the same manner and intensity as production welds and conduct the following. Ensure the cylinder of pipe cutout and the replacement pipe piece meet length restrictions for the diameter of pipe involved and ensure any weld repairs follow API 1104 and the qualified welding procedure that was used on the initial weld. Check proper beveling, fit up, weld quality, and NDT results versus standards. (If owner/operator allows more than one repair in a previously repaired area, verify that the repair is in accordance with a qualified weld repair procedure per 49 CFR 195.230.)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 49 CFR - Transportation http://www.49cfr.info/index.html http://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/49

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang 49 CFR - Transportation § 195.230 Welds: Repair or removal of defects. (a)  Each weld that is unacceptable under §  195.228  must be removed or repaired. Except for welds on an offshore pipeline being installed from a pipelay vessel, a weld must be removed if it has a crack that is more than 8 percent of the weld length. (b)  Each weld that is repaired must have the defect removed down to sound metal and the segment to be repaired must be preheated if conditions exist which would adversely affect the quality of the weld repair. After repair, the segment of the weld that was repaired must be inspected to ensure its acceptability. (c)  Repair of a crack, or of any defect in a previously repaired area must be in accordance with written weld repair procedures that have been qualified under §  195.214 . Repair procedures must provide that the minimum mechanical properties specified for the welding procedure used to make the original weld are met upon completion of the final weld repair. [Amdt. 195-29, 48 FR 48674, Oct. 20, 1983] http://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/49/195.230

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang D.2.8 Tie-ins Inspectors must inspect tie-in operations for proper alignment, beveling, welding, coating repair, and pipe placement and ensure pipe is properly supported when placed in the ditch (see ASME B31.4 Section 434.9). D.2.9 Documentation Inspectors complete in a timely manner all required records of welding operations, including but not limited to: number of welds, NDT records, rejection rates, repairs, and other documentation as specified by the owner/operator.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Annex E (normative) Corrosion Control Inspector E.1 Scope Individuals assigned as corrosion control inspectors (or coating inspectors) must be qualified and certified in corrosion control. Qualification and certification requires specialized schooling, usually under the auspices of NACE. E.2 Qualifications E.2.1 General Corrosion control inspectors should be knowledgeable in the basic requirements included herein, have completed the NACE Coating Inspector Program (CIP), Level 1, and be capable of carrying out the inspection duties below.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang E.2.2 Pipe Coating Requirements Inspectors should be knowledgeable about proper aboveground/ belowground coating application techniques, including surface preparation, priming, type and method of application, curing time, application limitations, atmospheric condition restrictions, and integrity testing (see NACE RP0169-06 and SSPC Volume 1). E.2.3 Mill Applied Coating Inspectors should be capable of inspecting, marking, and following repairs in accordance with specifications and manufacturer’s recommended repair criteria for any observed coating damage beginning with when the pipe arrives on the job to lowering in.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang E.2.4 Over the Ditch Coating Inspectors should inspect, assess, and note corrective action needed in the following areas: coating machine condition, suitability for the work, correct operation, and operator performance of his/her duties; ensure surface preparation meets specifications; check that correct primer is used, it is correctly applied at the specified thickness and drying time is within specification; verify correct coating is being applied at the proper rate, travel speed, tension, and overlap; verify proper lifting/placement techniques are used and coating protection is provided on lower in.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang E.2.5 Field Joint Coating Field joint coating and application methods are typically used on mill applied coating and all tie-ins. Inspectors should check the following to ensure coated field joints meet specifications: monitor contract personnel doing this work to ensure specified procedures are followed; ensure surface preparation meets specifications and manufacturer’s requirements/recommendations are followed; — ensure correct primer is used, properly applied at the right thickness, and drying time is within specified limits; ensure coating is the correct type, applied per specifications and manufacturer’s recommendations, and proper curing time is observed before movement of the pipe; check that coated pipe is properly handled and protected awaiting lower in.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang E.2.7 Cathodic Protection Requirements New pipelines require installation of corrosion control testing facilities, rectifier units, and ground beds. Inspectors must be knowledgeable about the proper installation and testing of these devices. Test leads for corrosion control monitoring should be checked by the inspectors to ensure they were installed properly. Rectifier units and ground beds must be checked by the inspectors to ensure proper installation per specifications and that they operate properly. Inspectors should complete owner/operator required documentation for these installations. E.2.8 Foreign Pipeline Bonding Requirements Inspectors should be knowledgeable on these installations, including the wiring, test station, and wire terminations and ensure they are tested and operate properly.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang E.2.9 Cathodic Protection Testing and Measurement Requirements Inspectors should ensure all rectifiers are read, calibrated where needed, and pipe to soil potentials are taken at test stations and measure any cased crossings for electrical shorts to ensure all installations meet specifications.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Pipeline CP

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Insulation Mono Block

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Acceptances

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang Acceptances

PowerPoint Presentation:

Charlie Chong/ Fion Zhang The End

authorStream Live Help