Hurricanes

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This video is the main fact on hurricanes. Music: Set Fire To The Rain - Adele

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Submitted To: Mr. Stirling Submitted By: Chanel Barrett Hurricanes

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A hurricane is a tropical storm with winds that have reached a constant speed of seventy four miles per hour or more. The circle of a hurricane that looks like a hole is called the “eye” of the hurricane. The eye of a storm is usually twenty to thirty miles wide and may extend over four hundred miles. What Is A Hurricane?

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For a hurricane to occur there must be: A low-pressure system Warm temperatures over the ocean. A moist environment (precipitation). Tropical wind patterns over the equator. The dangers of a storm include torrential rains, high winds and storm surges. A hurricane can last for 2 weeks or more over open water and can run a path across the entire length of the Eastern Seaboard. Weather Conditions For A Hurricane

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Category One: Maximum Sustained Wind Speed is seventy four to ninety five miles per hour. Damage it does is minimal Approximate Pressure is above nine hundred and eighty mb . Approximate Storm Surge is three to five feet. Five Category's Of Hurricanes Category one hurricane. Is not very big And does hardly any damage.

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Category Two: Maximum sustained wind speed is ninety six to one hundred and ten miles per hour The damage a category two hurricane causes is around moderate Approximate pressure of a category two hurricane is nine hundred and seventy nine to nine hundred and sixty five. Approximate storm surge is from six to eight feet. Category two hurricane. Not much worse then a category one hurricane but still does enough damage. More flooding then anything else.

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Category Three: Maximum sustained wind speed of a category three hurricane is from one hundred and eleven to one hundred and thirty miles per hour. Damage a category three hurricane does is extensive. Approximate pressure of a category three hurricane is nine hundred and sixty four to nine hundred and forty five mb . Approximate storm surge of a category three hurricane is nine to twelve feet. A category three hurricane usually does a lot of damage and ruins nearly everything in its path.

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Category Four: Maximum sustained wind speed of a category four hurricane is one hundred and thirty one miles to one hundred and fifty five miles per hour. Damage a category four hurricane does is extreme. Approximate pressure of a category four hurricane is nine hundred and forty four to nine hundred and twenty mb . Approximate storm surge of a category four hurricane is thirteen to eighteen feet. A category four hurricane does extreme amount of damage such as floods and destroying homes and buildings.

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Category Five: Maximum sustained wind speed of a category five hurricane is above one hundred and fifty five miles per hour. The damage a category five hurricane does is catastrophic which means it is extremely harmful. Approximate pressure of a category five hurricane is below nine hundred and twenty mb . Approximate storm surge of a category five hurricane is more than eighteen feet. A category five hurricane is deadly and will destroy nearly everything in its path.

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On average, one hundred tropical storms develop each year between May and November over the Atlantic Ocean. Half of these begin over Africa near the Cape Verde Islands. About twenty five of these disturbances develop into tropical depressions. Out of these twenty five tropical depressions, ten of them become tropical storms. Out of these remaining ten storms, only six become hurricanes. Of these six hurricanes, two are likely to strike the coast of the United States. Statistics of Storms

Hurricane Katrina.:

Hurricane Katrina. Category five, hurricane Katrina at peak strength on August 28, 2005. It was the deadliest and most destructive Atlantic hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. Before After

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The seventy four to one hundred and sixty mile per hour winds of a hurricane can go inland for hundreds of miles. Hurricanes can turn into tornadoes , which add to the destructiveness of the storm. Floods and flash floods are generated by heavy rains also causing damage and loss of life. Following a hurricane, inland streams and rivers can flood and trigger landslides. When a hurricane watch is issued, the best response is to protect your property by boarding up windows, bringing in outside items, and being prepared to evacuate the areas as soon as you are advised. Emergency Information

Source Page:

Source Page http://geography.about.com/od/lists/a/hurrcategories.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Katrina http://gohsep.la.gov/factsheets/definitionofahurricane.htm

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