Outline and Characteristics of the Synoptic Gospels

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A brief outline and characteristics of the Synoptic Gospels.

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Outline and Characteristics of the Synoptic Gospels:

Outline and Characteristics of the Synoptic Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

An Outline of Matthew’s Gospel One way to outline Matthew is according to a division based on the five discourses ending in a common formula (Mt. 7:28-29; 11:1; 13:53; 19:1; 26:1). D. A. Carson and Douglas J. Moo, in An Introduction to the New Testament offer the following outline. Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

A prologue (1:1-2:23) The gospel of the kingdom (3:1-7:29) The kingdom extended (8:1-11:1) Rising opposition (11:2-13:53) Progressive polarization (13:54-19:2) The triumph of grace (19:3-26:5) The passion and resurrection of Jesus (26:6-28:20). Note: There are several “triadic structures” such as the three parables of growth (Mt. 13:24-30; 13:31-32; 13:33). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

Five Characteristics of Matthew’s Gospel Though everyone can benefit from Matthew’s Gospel, it bears the characteristics of a book written to Jews. This can be seen in the words spoken about the Jews (Mt. 10:5-6; 15:24), the Law (Mt. 5:17-18), and to the Pharisees (Mt. 12:14, 24; 15:13; 16:12; 23:2). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

It contains the topic of the Church (Mt. 16:13-23; 18:17). It contains teaching about the End Times (Mt. 24-25). It contains a great deal of Jesus’ teachings, such as the Sermon on the Mount (Mt. 5-7), and the parables of the Kingdom (Mt. 13) and the coming King (Mt. 24-25). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

It contains much about Jesus as the King (Mt. 1:1-17; 2:2; 5:21, 27, 34, 38, 43; 21:1-11; 27:11, 32; 28). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

An Outline of Mark’s Gospel Carson and Moo give the following outline for Mark: Preliminaries to ministry (1:1-13) First part of the Galilean ministry (1:16-3:6) Second part of the Galilean ministry (3:13-5:43) The concluding phase of the Galilean ministry (6:7-8:26) The way of glory and suffering (8:27-10:52) Final ministry in Jerusalem (11:1-13:37) The passion and empty-tomb narratives (15:1-16:8). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

Five Characteristics of Mark’s Gospel It is direct. It stresses the fact that Jesus is the Son of God (Mk. 1:22; 1:27; 4:41; 6:51, etc.). It reveals the human side of Christ (Mk. 7:1, 8; 6:31, 34, etc.). He used vivid detail (Mk. 4:38; 6:40; 9:36). His style was simple. Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

An Outline of Luke’s Gospel Carson and Moo give the following outline of Luke’s Gospel: The Prologue (1:1-4) The Births of John the Baptist and Jesus (1:5-2:52), Preparation for the Ministry (3:1-4:13) The Ministry of Jesus in Galilee (4:14-9:50) Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem (9:51-19:44) Jesus in Jerusalem (19:45-21:38) Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection (22:1-24:53). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

Five Characteristics of Luke’s Gospel It was written to a Gentile audience (Lk. 2:32 and note the praise to Samaritans) It addressed minority groups (Gentile Centurion; sent to ”seek and save” what was lost and be a friend of publicans and sinners; relates to the outcast Zachaeus , the tax collector) It addressed the women (Mary, Elizabeth, Anna, Mary and Martha, and the widow of Nain are all mentioned). Introducing the Gospels

Introducing the Gospels:

It contains the prayer ministry of Christ (Jesus prayed before selecting the disciples, He prayed on the cross, and there are parables on prayer). It speaks much of joy (the Gospel begins with the angel announcing joy, in the three parables of the lost things great joy comes when the items were found; the disciples return with joy after their evangelism, and there are great hymns of praise—the Magnificat [Lk. 1:46-52], the Benedictus , etc.). Introducing the Gospels

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