Wisconsin’s Education Problem: Illusion of Stability; Glimmer of Hope

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Wisconsin’s Education Problem: An Illusion of Stability; a Glimmer of Hope:

Wisconsin’s Education Problem: An Illusion of Stability; a Glimmer of Hope

Educational Results in Wisconsin:

Educational Results in Wisconsin Once a leader in both educational standing and reform, Wisconsin has gone from good to mediocre over the past decade The rise of school choice and charter schools has been stemmed, limiting the impact of educational innovation in the state Educational funding has generally increased while educational results have remained static – especially in Wisconsin’s reading results

In Budget Crises, an Opening for School Reform :

In Budget Crises, an Opening for School Reform Michelle Rhee, former Chancellor of Washington, D.C. schools, Wall Street Journal, January 11, 2011 Founder of Students First “In the past year, 46 states grappled with budget deficits of more than $130 billion. This year could be worse as federal recovery dollars dry up. And yet, for education reform, 2011 could be the best of times.”

Wisconsin State Budget Education Funding:

Wisconsin State Budget Education Funding Equalization Aid Other General Aids* Categorical Aids Total School Aid FY Amount % of Total Amount % Change Amount % Change ’08-09 4,699.3 86.0 112.2 2.1 650.9 11.9 5,462.4 ‘09-10 4,521.8 85.1 149.4 2.8 644.2 12.1 5,315.4 ‘10-11 4,548.0 85.4 123.2 2.3 653.8 12.3 5,325.0 Source: Legislative Fiscal Bureau * - Includes Chapter 220, special adjustment, high poverty, and minimum aids 2009 – 2011 budget spent $3.45 billion in federal stimulus funds and just over $2 billion of that was spent on existing programs

Educational Results in Wisconsin:

Educational Results in Wisconsin Wisconsin continues to do well on the ACT 47,755 of its 2010 graduates took the ACT college admissions test, and their composite score of 22.1 put the state in third nationally among ACT-taking states.

Educational Results in Wisconsin:

Educational Results in Wisconsin Source: NAEP Testing Data, National Center for Educational Statistics, 1998-2010.

Graduation Rates and the Achievement Gap:

Graduation Rates and the Achievement Gap Wisconsin’s state-reported graduation rates remain one of the highest in the country: According to NCES data, WI’s rate of 89.6% was the best in the country in 2008, the last year of data available However, problems still exist. The state currently has the 2 nd largest achievement gap in graduation rates between white and African-American students. This carries over into standardized testing. According to National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) testing, Wisconsin has the largest gap in the country when it comes to eighth grade science concepts. White Students Grad. Rate Black Students Grad. Rate Achievement Gap Nat'l Avg. 81.0 Nat'l Avg. 61.5 19.5 Wisconsin 94.0 Wisconsin 63.1 30.9

Race to the Top Failure:

Race to the Top Failure Wisconsin twice failed to be a finalist in the Race to the Top program – missing out on a share of $4.1 billion in educational funding This failure can be traced to several causes, including: stagnant climate for educational reform a growing achievement gap between students a rejection of policies that would have placed more accountability and responsibilities on teachers for their students Additionally, the value of a Wisconsin education may not be all we think it is…

The Accountability Illusion: What is the true value of graduating if Wisconsin’s schools don’t make the grade?:

The Accountability Illusion: What is the true value of graduating if Wisconsin’s schools don’t make the grade? The Fordham Institute’s The Accountability Illusion examined the standards of U.S. public schools A collection of 36 low-to-mid performing schools were chosen to test the AYP standards from state to state; the more schools that passed AYP in the study, the lower the state’s threshold for grading schools Of the 28 states examined, WI’s standards were the lowest by far – allowing sub-par schools to give the appearance of legitimacy

Wisconsin’s Student Population:

Wisconsin’s Student Population As parents become more disappointed with their traditional neighborhood schools, they are turning to alternative educational options more frequently: Wisconsin 2001 Total Students % of Total Student Population Traditional Public Schools 856,739 81.73% Charter Schools*** 10,070 0.96% Public Online Charter (Virtual) Schools 0 0.00% Open Enrollment public school transfers 7,213 0.69% Chapter 220 public school transfers 5,454 0.52% Private Schools 148,336 14.15% Homeschooling 20,382 1.94% Students Exercising Choice 191,455 18.27% Total Students: 1,048,194 100% ***Estimate based on number of operating charter schools in Wisconsin and average number of students enrolled per school in WI in that time frame. Wisconsin 2009 Total Students % of Total Student Population Traditional Public Schools 763,300 74.57% Charter Schools 37,432 3.66% Public Online Charter (Virtual) Schools 3,635 0.36% Open Enrollment public school transfers* 28,025 2.74% Chapter 220 public school transfers Interdistrict transfers 3,111 0.30% Intradistrict transfers 31,200 3.05% Three-Choice Enrollment* 6,883 0.67% Private Schools 130,800 12.78% Homeschooling 19,269 1.88% Students Exercising Choice 260,355 25.43% Total Students: 1,023,655 100%

Milwaukee’s Student Population:

Milwaukee’s Student Population This shift towards choice schools is even more prevalent in Milwaukee – the birthplace of modern school choice in America Milwaukee 2001 Total Students % of Total Student Population Traditional Public Schools 89,720 72.34% Charter Schools*** 1,411 1.14% Public Online Charter (Virtual) Schools 0 0.00% Open Enrollment public school transfers 854 0.69% Chapter 220 public school transfers*** 6,000 4.84% Private Schools 25,026 20.18% Homeschooling 1,019 0.82% Students Exercising Choice 34,310 27.66% Total Students: 124,030 100% Milwaukee 2009 Total Students % of Total Student Population Traditional Public Schools 27,831 24.20% Charter Schools 17,612 15.31% Public Online Charter (Virtual) Schools 977 0.85% Open Enrollment public school transfers 4,562 3.97% Chapter 220 public school transfers Interdistrict Transfers 2,720 2.36% Intradistrict Transfers 24,796 21.56% Three-Choice Enrollment* 6,883 5.98% Private Schools 28,893 25.12% Homeschooling 748 0.65% Students Exercising Choice 87,191 75.80% Total Students: 115,022 100% *Estimate based on MPS reporting of students attending neighborhood schools (District Communications Plan May 2008 - Revised 11.25.09).

Wisconsin is Falling Behind the U.S. The U.S. is Falling Behind the World:

Wisconsin is Falling Behind the U.S. The U.S. is Falling Behind the World The average U.S. reading achievement score on the PIRLS International Report dropped from 2001 to 2006 (most recent year of data available) Over this same period, America’s worldwide rank in achievement went from 9 th to 15 th Notable countries that outperform the U.S.: Latvia (+1 points better than the avg. American student) Bulgaria (+7) Singapore (+18)

Wisconsin is Falling Behind the U.S. The U.S. is Falling Behind the World:

Despite having one of the highest rankings in human development, America’s education as a whole is lagging Wisconsin is Falling Behind the U.S. The U.S. is Falling Behind the World 2001 2006 Source: PIRLS International Report, 2001 and 2006.

The Florida Model:

The Florida Model How the Sunshine State Turned Around its Schools – and How “ Unteachable ” Students are Outperforming Wisconsin

Giving the Most to the Students with the Least: How Florida Turned it Around:

Giving the Most to the Students with the Least: How Florida Turned it Around

Florida’s Origins:

Florida’s Origins Florida’s student population struggled in the 90s - Only 53% of 4 th Graders in the state had passing grades when it came to Reading, according to NAEP data A major component of this lack of success was rooted in the state’s dynamic student body – particularly its low-income (37% proficient) and Hispanic (31%) student populations

Sweeping Reform:

Sweeping Reform Florida’s failures in the classroom reached a critical point. Reform was needed to pull the state’s education system out of its death spiral In 1999, Florida lawmakers took a buckshot approach to what had become the state’s biggest problem Legislators instituted a series to reforms to guarantee their impact, effectively changing how schools are run in the Sunshine State

Sweeping Reform:

Sweeping Reform Florida legislation included: Ending social promotion from the third grade Rewarding schools/teachers for student achievement on AP exams A comprehensive school grading program (grading institutions A-F, penalizing failing schools) Enacting the Step Up for Students Tax Credit scholarship for low-income families Enacting the McKay Scholarships for Students with Disabilities (the nation’s largest special needs school voucher program) Expanding the state’s charter school program Expanding the scope of alternative teacher certification Creating the largest virtual school program in the country Impressively, Florida was able to enact these reforms without significant additional commitment to student funding. Expenditures per student only rose by approximately $300 (adjusted for inflation) and came from general state and local funds.

Jeb Bush’s Role:

Jeb Bush’s Role As governor of Florida from 1999 to 2007, Jeb Bush championed school choice. His first year in office he created a program that offered vouchers to students in failing schools. The program successfully boosted student achievement until it was struck down by the Supreme Court in 2006. Two other Bush-supported programs -- one that offers tax credits to business that help send low-income kids to private schools and another that gives vouchers to disabled students -– survived the high-court ruling. Bush also expanded the Florida Virtual School, a national model for online public education. Since leaving office, Bush has promoted his reform agenda in other states. He founded the Foundation for Excellence in Education and serves as co-chair of the Digital Learning Council.

The Results?:

The Results? Florida made huge gains, particularly amongst its lowest performing students These effects still resonate today, as the first generation of students affected by these changes matriculate towards graduation

The Results:

The Results

The Results:

The Results Florida’s gains were spurred by improvements amongst the lowest-performing students This was an intended effect: struggling students count for double in Florida’s program, ensuring that the students that need the most help count the most when it comes to evaluation

The Results:

The Results Thanks to this shift in how Florida views and assesses its schools, the population of low-performing schools has shrunk – and the number of high-performing ones has increased significantly

So Florida’s Done Well; What About Wisconsin?:

So Florida’s Done Well; What About Wisconsin? While Florida’s educational achievement has risen dramatically over the past decade, Wisconsin’s has remained mostly static The only area of significant improvement on NAEP 4 th Grade reading tests has been amongst Hispanic students. Still, Floridians outgained Wisconsinites by over 200% when it came to these improvements However, Wisconsin isn’t alone when it comes to lagging behind Florida in 2010

Florida’s Hispanic Students vs. all students across the United States:

Florida’s Hispanic Students vs. all students across the United States

Wisconsin’s Education Problem: a Glimmer of Hope:

Wisconsin’s Education Problem: a Glimmer of Hope Florida has provided the roadmap Multiple pronged approach, not one size fits all reform High standards for individual students and schools Concentrate on reading Reward Success (not seniority) Close the achievement gap Assess schools based on rigorous standards, arm parents with information, transparency throughout

For additional information, please visit::

For additional information, please visit: www.maciverinstitute.com

Wisconsin State Budget Existing Education Reform Programs:

Wisconsin State Budget Existing Education Reform Programs 2010-11 Funding (In Millions) Maximum Pupil Membership Amount Per Pupil Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP) 130.8 20,300 $6,442 Milwaukee -Racine Charter School Program 57.3 7,200 $7,775 Virtual Charter Schools ? 5,250 $6,500 approx.

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