Film Tech

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Film Techniques:

Film Techniques By Liam A., Liam H., and Milan S.

Slide2:

Aerial Shot An extremely high angle view of a subject usually taken from a crane or a high stationary camera position, but may also refer to a shot taken from an actual airplane or helicopter. (Production).

Slide3:

Bird’s Eye shot A shot looking directly down on the subject, can emphasize the smallness or insignificance of the subjects. Normally used for battle scenes or establishing where the character is.

Slide4:

Depth of Field The area in front of the camera that appears sharp in the frame is called depth of field. Depth of Field is defined as the range of acceptable focus on a shot or photograph.

Slide5:

Establishing Shot A usually long shot in film or video used at the beginning of a sequence to establish an overview of the scene that follows.

Slide6:

Fade A visual transition between shots or scenes that appears on screen as a brief interval with no picture. The editor fades one shot to black and then fades in the next. Often used to indicate a change in time and place.

Slide7:

Freeze Frame Shot A technique where One shot is printed in a single frame several times, in order to make an interesting illusion of a still photograph.

Slide8:

Jump Cut Basically, two similar shots cut together with a jump in continuity, camera position or time.

Slide9:

Pan A horizontal camera move on an axis, from right to left or left to right. In a pan the camera is turning on an axis rather than across space, as in a dolly shot.

Slide10:

Time Lapse Of, using, or being a technique that photographs a naturally slow process, such as plant growth, on movie film at intervals, so that continuous projection of the frames gives an accelerated view of the process.

Slide11:

Tracking Shot A movie shot made by a camera moving steadily on a track or dolly.

Slide12:

Whip Pan T he act of panning the camera very rapidly from one subject to another, frequently blurring the images in between the subjects.

Slide13:

Thank you for listening Fin

authorStream Live Help