LGBT Rights in Russia

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LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia By: Blyss Bowman

LGBT Rights: An International Issue:

LGBT Rights: An International Issue Many LGBT people around the globe are living in fear as they attempt to gain their voice to fight for their rights Many governments across the world criminalize the very identities of LGBT people

LGBT Rights: An International Issue:

LGBT Rights: An International Issue Currently, there are criminal penalties for being gay in Uganda and Nigeria India and Australia have attempted to move forward with LGBT rights, but each of these countries have had these laws overturned Transgender youth in Jamaica are being murdered There are “reparative therapies” being done in Latin America There are acts of anti-gay discrimination in Eastern Europe In certain states in the U.S., same-sex couples are still unable to be married

LGBT Rights: An International Issue:

LGBT Rights: An International Issue 40% of the world’s population lives in one of the 81 countries where homosexuality is a crime 10 of these countries carry the death penalty for being homosexual There have been over 1,000 murders of transgender people reported in the last 6 years

LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia During the last 20 years, there was not much attention focused on LGBT Rights in Russia Until 1993, being a gay man in Russia could result in incarceration 500 to 1,00o men were annually incarcerated for being gay in Russia between 1960 and 1990

LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia Although article 12.1 that criminalized sex between men in Russia was lifted in 1993, Russia’s “free” 90s continued to view homosexuality as “anti-Russian;” this is because it was considered undermining to Russian norms

LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission was formed in 1991 taking 90 American LGBT activists to the Soviet Union to advocate for fair rights for the gay and lesbian community Unfortunately, violence continued against the LGBT people throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s

LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia In 1996, Russia joined the Council of Europe and adopted its jurisprudence and norms In 1997, transgender Russians were allowed to legally change their gender on identity documents

LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia Unfortunately, in 2006, and 2011-2013, laws were passed in different regions of Russia banning homosexuality “propaganda” This includes any public discussion or portrayal of non-traditional sexual relationships This law was passed with the intent to “protect” minors

LGBT Rights in Russia:

LGBT Rights in Russia

Penalties:

Penalties Failure to follow this law results in a fine of 4,000 to 5,000 rubles ($120-$150 U.S. dollars) Corporations or other legal entities can be fined up to 800,000 to 1 million rubles ($24,000 to $30,000 U.S. dollars) Propaganda transported over the internet can result in more severe fines Foreigners who fail to follow this law may be incarcerated for 15 days

2014 Sochi Olympics:

2014 Sochi Olympics In 2014, Russia hosted the Winter Olympics in Sochi This event shed light on Putin’s anti-gay law, as individuals around the world were being called to Russia for the Olympics There had been strong international criticisms that caused protesting of the boycott of the games Many gay rights activists were arrested during the Olympics and faced fines and prison sentences

Current Problems:

Current Problems Russia’s anti-gay propaganda law exposes many LGBT people to violence, physical and psychological abuse, harassment and stigma Russian authorities are sending a dangerous message that it is acceptable to be violent towards LGBT people without any consequences LGBT people have noticed an increase in harassment since the passing of the anti-gay law, and they predict an even larger increase as the years go on

Current Problems:

Current Problems In 2013, the Russian LGBT Network conducted an anonymous survey in Russia on discrimination against the LGBT community Over half of the respondents experienced psychological abuse and 15 percent experienced physical abuse 6 percent contacted the police

Current Problems:

Current Problems LGBT people have become more depressed, closed off, and discouraged since the passing of the propaganda law Venues refuse to book LGBT events and Russian journalists refuse to cover LGBT stories with fear of the consequences of the law and the violence of the anti-gay activists Finally, the LGBT movement is being increasingly hurt due to supporters choosing to emigrate

Globalization:

Globalization Currently, LGBT rights are being violated not only in Russia, but across the globe, even in the U.S. Anti-gay violence calls social workers to focus in on the core values of human rights and social justice The actions of Russia both directly and indirectly affect other countries’ social well-being An example of this can be seen at the 2014 Sochi Olympics as individuals from across the world were impacted by Russia’s policy

Globalization:

Globalization Globalization can be used by governments of different nations to come together to share ideas to combat anti-gay laws and prejudices Globalization can also be used to reduce stigma against the LGBT community as a whole, with the aim towards equal human rights for all

The United Nations:

The United Nations In September 2014, the United Nations Human Rights Council adopted a resolution to condemn violence and discrimination against LGBT people around the globe This is the second time that the U.N. has referred to LGBT rights as “human rights”

The United Nations:

The United Nations Currently, this resolution has no enforcement and is mostly a symbolic gesture However, Secretary General Ban- Ki Moon has spoken out about Russia’s anti-gay law, condemning the policy for discriminating against the LGBT community The United Nations stands strongly behind their “free and equal” campaign

U.N. Secretary General Ban-Ki Moon :

U.N. Secretary General Ban- Ki Moon

Amnesty International:

Amnesty International Amnesty International supports the full range of human rights for all people, without exception Amnesty International encourages all people to write to Russian authorities to urge them to end prosecution and ensure full respect of all LGBT people

President Obama :

President Obama In response to Russia’s anti-gay law, President Obama has been quoted stating, "Instead of targeting our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters, we can use our laws to protect their rights. Instead of defining ourselves in opposition to others, we can affirm the aspirations that we hold in common. That's what will make America strong. That's what will make Europe strong. That's what makes us who we are.”

Summary:

Summary Anti-gay violence continues to occur all over the globe and some countries, specifically Russia, have anti-gay laws in place that negatively affect the human rights of the LGBT community It is extremely evident that we have a long way to go in fighting for equality We must join together globally to address these human rights issues and encourage equal human rights and justice for all These actions will take positive steps towards reducing the stigma associated with the LGBT community

References:

References CBS News. (2014). Russia Arrests 4 Gay Rights Activists on Opening Day of Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony. Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/russia-arrests-4-gay-rights-activists-on-opening-day-2014-sochi-winter-olympics-opening-ceremony/ Clarke, L. (2013). Russia’s Anti-Gay Law Brings Controversy Ahead of 2014 Sochi Olympics. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/olympics/russias-anti-gay-law-brings-controversy-ahead-of-2014-sochi-olympics/2013/08/18/b42b5182-076f-11e3-9259-e2aafe5a5f84_story.html CNN News. (2014). Obama Continues Chiding Russia on Gay Rights. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/26/politics/obama-gay-rights/

References:

References Council for Global Equality (2013). The Facts on LGBT Rights in Russia. Retrieved from http://www.globalequality.org/newsroom/latest-news/1-in-the-news/186-the-facts-on-lgbt-rights-in-russia Ford, J. (2014). United Nations Condemns Russia’s Anti-Gay Laws. Retrieved from http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2014/02/06/3257991/united-nations-condemns-russias-anti-gay-laws/ Healy, L.M. (2010). International Social Work: Professional Action in an Interdependent World. New York, NY: Oxford University Press

References:

References Howard, A. (2014). UN Passes Resolution on Behalf of LGBT Citizens Around the Globe. Retrieved from http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/un-passes-resolution-behalf-lgbt-citizens-around-the-globe HuffPost . (2014). International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia Taking Place in Over 120 Countries. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/17/international-day-against-homophobia-2014_n_5240471.html Human Rights Watch. (2014). Russia: Sochi Games Highlight Homophobic Violence. Retrieved from http://www.hrw.org/news/2014/02/03/russia-sochi-games-highlight-homophobic-violence

References:

References Keating, J. (2014). The Chilling Effects of Russia’s Anti-Gay Law, One Year Later. Retrieved from http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2014/10/09/russian_lgbt_activists_on_the_effects_of_gay_propaganda_law.html Lekus , I. (2015). Russia: Defending LGBT Rights is Not “Propaganda.” Retrieved from http://blog.amnestyusa.org/europe/russia-defending-lgbt-rights-is-not-propaganda/ Schaaf , M. (2013). Advocating for Equality: A Brief History of LGBT Rights in Russia.  Harriman Magazine , 23-27.

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