workplace violence

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Dealing with Workplace Violence : 

Dealing with Workplace Violence

Cases of Workplace Violence : 

Cases of Workplace Violence February 1992, Waterloo Ontario - Three people shot to death by coworker claiming to be harassed daily November 1999, Hawaii – Disgruntled employee at a Xerox plant shoots seven co-workers June 1999, Ottawa – Worker shoots and kills four people then himself well documented case of harassment

Cases of Workplace Violence : 

Cases of Workplace Violence April 1999, Taber Alberta – Fourteen year old boy shoots and kills one and wounds another at his high school. Boy was the victim of bullying. This happened right after the Columbine shootings. November 2005, Windsor – A Doctor who was dating a nurse he worked with stabbed her to death in the recovery room several months after she broke up with him. He then injected himself with medication and killed himself. Both left children behind.

Cases of Workplace Violence : 

Cases of Workplace Violence July 2008, Henderson Kentucky – Harassed worker brings a gun to work and shoots five people to death them himself. Note said “I never deserved this” July 2008, Cambridge – Delft Blue Veal plant. A man well known by all to be a victim of harassment lost control and began attacking people with knives. He stabbed to death the one man who tried to help him. Dead man left two small children behind.

Violence is Ugly : 

Violence is Ugly We owe it to ourselves and our loved ones to eliminate violence in the workplace. Our work environment should be a safe place not only from accidents but from all risks

It’s not so bad in Canada though….Right? : 

It’s not so bad in Canada though….Right? WRONG!! Canada ranks 4th in the world per capita for workplace violence USA is ranked 7th

What is Workplace Violence : 

What is Workplace Violence Extreme or persistent behaviour (language, actions, activities) that provokes fear for one’s personal safety or the safety of co-workers, clients, contractors or family

Workplace Violence : 

Workplace Violence Workplace violence is not limited to incidents that occur within a traditional workplace. Work-related violence can occur at off-site business-related functions (conferences, trade shows), at social events related to work, in clients' homes or away from work but resulting from work (a threatening telephone call to your home from a co-worker or a supervisor).

What is Workplace Violence : 

What is Workplace Violence Rumours Swearing Verbal abuse Pranks Arguments Property damage Vandalism Pushing Theft Physical assaults Psychological trauma Rape Arson Murder

Two Myths : 

Two Myths Workplace violence will not happen to me It can and will happen to the majority of workers if steps to prevent it aren’t taken Workplace violence cannot be prevented It can be prevented and it starts with each of you!

Examples of Workplace Violence : 

Examples of Workplace Violence Physical attacks - hitting, shoving, pushing or kicking Worker examining an electrical panel co-worker who is angry at him walks past and intentionally bumps him from behind causing him to fall into the panel Verbal or written threats - any expression of an intent to inflict harm Co-worker is angry that another worker left work for him that he should have done and says, “You do that again and I’ll kick your ass”

Examples of Workplace Violence : 

Examples of Workplace Violence Threatening behaviour - such as shaking fists, destroying property or throwing objects Supervisor is angry that a worker has a memo pad in their breast pocket. He grabs it from the pocket and throws it at the worker Coworker comes to his car after work and finds hand sanitizer squirted all over the front seat

Canadian Statistics Workplace Violence : 

Canadian Statistics Workplace Violence 356,000 acts of workplace violence in Canada in 2004 Almost 20% (one out of five) incidents of violent victimization, including physical assault, sexual assault and robbery, occur in the victim's workplace 71% of workplace violence involves incidents of physical assault. Men and women were equally likely to have reported experiencing workplace violence

Canadian Statistics Workplace Violence : 

Canadian Statistics Workplace Violence Men commit 66% of violent acts in the workplace 27% of incidents involving male victims resulted in injuries, compared with 17% of those involving female victims. Estimated that only 37% (just over 1 in 3) workplace violence incidents are reported 57% of male victims report while only 20% of female victims report

Harassment : 

Harassment Strong connection between harassment and violence Bullying isn’t just happening in the school yard. It happens in the workplace

The Bully : 

The Bully

Harassment : 

Harassment Any behaviour that demeans, embarrasses, humiliates, annoys, alarms or verbally abuses a person and that is known or would be expected to be unwelcome. This includes words, gestures, intimidation, bullying, or other inappropriate activities

Harassment / Bullying : 

Harassment / Bullying Who does this….and Why!? People who want to grab for control People who are insecure and feel inadequate People who gain & exercise power through the humiliation of others They disguise it as humour, call it “old school”, justify it any way they can School bullies, who never grew up or learned that everyone deserves respect

How does it come to this? : 

How does it come to this? It starts small and grows It takes three parties The harasser The victim The watchers

Who are the Watchers? : 

Who are the Watchers? People who stand by and let it happen May include: Co-workers Supervisors Managers Union leaders

Why do they Watch? : 

Why do they Watch? Afraid they will be next Being wrong Rejection by harasser, co-workers, boss Rejection by the victim Retaliation Becoming labeled as “over-sensitive”, “trouble-maker” or “not having a sense of humour.” Gossip, loss of confidentiality Damaged reputations Loss of job

VICTIMS FEARS WHY DON'T THEY SPEAK UP? : 

VICTIMS FEARS WHY DON'T THEY SPEAK UP? Not being believed Being wrong Rejection by harasser, co-workers, boss Retaliation Becoming labeled as “over-sensitive”, “trouble-maker” or “not having a sense of humour.” Gossip, loss of confidentiality Damaged reputations Loss of job

Slide 23: 

HAVING THE COURAGE TO SAY STOP • Verbalize your concerns and let the other person know your boundaries in a respectful manner COMMUNICATION - Request the behaviour to stop - Be willing to listen - Emphasize the impact the behaviour has on you - Verbalize your expectations moving forward - Minimize the personal confrontation

Reduction and Prevention : 

Reduction and Prevention Assess Be aware, visibility, don’t contribute, don’t be a watcher Develop Definitions, Policies, zero tolerance, significant consequences for violation Training Awareness of the problem and options for dealing with the problem

Reduction and Prevention : 

Reduction and Prevention Reporting Investigations and reports for action Review Debrief incidents, change policies as required

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