Sickle Cell Disease

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Sickle Cell Disease :

Sickle Cell Disease Autumn Taylor

What Is Sickle Cell Disease:

What Is Sickle Cell Disease Sickle Cell Disease changes normal, round red blood cells into cells that are shaped like crescent moons. Normal blood cells can easily move through blood vessels. However, sickled blood cells can easily get stuck and block blood vessels. This can stop ocygen from getting to critical parts of the human body.

Causes:

Causes Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited blood disorder, passed from parent to child. Children with sickle cell disease have two defective hemoglobin S genes, one from each parent.

Causes continued:

Causes continued Sickle Cell Disease is particularly common among those whose ancestors came from sub-Saharan Africa; Spanish-speaking regions in the Western Hemisphere (South America, the Caribbean, and Central America); Saudi Arabia; India; and Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy.

Incidence (In the United States):

Incidence (In the United States) SCD affects 90,000 to 100,000 Americans SCD occurs among about 1/500 African American births SCD occurs among about 1/36,000 Hispanic American births SCT (trait) occurs among 1/12 African Americans

Risk Factors:

Risk Factors A Child’s risk of getting sickle cell disorder occurs when he or she inherits one sickle cell gene and one other type of defective hemoglobin gene. If both parents have the sickle cell trait, each of their children will have a 25% chance of having sickle cell disease If one parent has sickle cell disease and the other has sickle cell trait each of their children have a 50% chance of having sickle cell disease and a 50% chance of having the sickle cell trait If one parent has sickle cell disease and the other has two normal hemoglobin A genes, each of their children will have the sickle cell trait. However, none of their children will have the disease

Current Treatment:

Current Treatment Treatment particularly involves getting routine tests to monitor health, managing pain events, and treating related health problems as they arise. This can include: Routine immunizations Daily antibiotics (age 2 months – 5 yrs ) Multivitamin supplements with iron d uring infancy Folic acid supplements daily Protein supplements if there is no weight gain Complete blood count Urine tests Monitor functioning of the organs Tests to check for vision problems

Sources:

Sources http:// www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/sickle-cell-disease-treatment-overview http:// www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/data.html http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sickle-cell_disease (pictures)

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