Why me, why now - APGA Case Session - Making your case for support - D

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“Why Me? Why Now? What’s the Impact?” Build a More Compelling Case for Support American Public Gardens Association Annual Conference Friday, June 22, 2012 Beverly Duzik , Desert Botanical Garden Willard White, Marts & Lundy Joan Thomas, Bok Tower Gardens Jon McGann, Corporate DevelopMint © Copyright 2012 American Public Gardens Association. This presentation is intended for viewing only and should not be copied or re-distributed for further use.

A Tale of Two Gardens: Part 1:

A Tale of Two Gardens: Part 1 Case Examples

A Tale of Two Gardens: Part 2:

A Tale of Two Gardens: Part 2 Starting the Journey A Desert Odyssey

The Landscape, 2009::

The Landscape, 2009: Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Original endowment never added to “We are not a fundraising Board” No formal development program: Membership, gala, tributes were main annual giving programs Sponsorships and annual fund more recently added Campaigns (‘94, ‘07) mostly single capital, Board/inner circle giving only No stewardship program

Catalysts:

Catalysts Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Long Range Plan – Vision of “World-Class” Garden Where will the $$ come from to fund this? Campaign to galvanize and provide energy Build a strong ongoing fundraising program Master Plan – 3 phases over 25 years $10M Phase I working goal

Challenges:

Challenges Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Making our case - finding our voice Not asking? Must not need the money! Building a case/culture of philanthropy Leadership first, then staff

Timetable:

Timetable Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Development Assessment 4 months 2. Master Plan Development 7 months 3. Approval of MP, Campaign 4. Writing the Case 5 months

Challenges while writing our Case…:

Challenges while writing our Case… Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Projects and priorities evolved 2. We struggled to articulate the “why?” 3. Finding the right emotional tone

Outcomes to Date:

Outcomes to Date Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Sharing the case with donors $4.7M raised of $10M to date Leadership can articulate the “whys” Board transitioning their role in fundraising Staff culture of philanthropy increasing $81% participation in giving

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Bok Tower Gardens Starting the Journey Joan Thomas, CFRE Director of Development Bok Tower Gardens 863-734-1213 jthomas@boktower.org

A Desert Odyssey:

Case Development at Desert Botanical Garden A Desert Odyssey

Epic Voyage…Extended, wandering journey… Adventure…Quest:

Epic Voyage…Extended, wandering journey… Adventure…Quest

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Board commitment: new Endowment campaign Consultant recommendation: programmatic enhancements Objective: Write Case for Feasibility Study Then: June 2004

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Board developed & approved Five-Year Plan (2000-05) Endowment Study Committee notes Senior Management Team Planning Then: June 2004 Case Resources

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Articulate convincing rationale for major projects and a new campaign, 5 years following Growing a Legacy New Strategic Plan not yet written New projects not yet “fleshed out” or fully vetted with Board and stakeholders 2004 Challenges

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THEN: June 2004

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NOW: June 2012

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Planning Chronology 20 year Master Plan 2012 Core Trail Master Plan Active Engagement and Formal Report from Board St. Planning Committee Results of online Membership Survey SQ Article and PowerPoint Presentations of the Plan Now: June 2012 Case Resources

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7 Task Force Summary Reports Conservation Alliance Core Trail Master Plan Horticulture & Education Center Community Gardening Permanent Butterfly Pavilion structure Planning for a Family & Children’s Garden Leadership and Funding NOZA Donor Screening Report Now: June 2012 Case Resources

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Donor Fatigue: “Campaign” Term is banned Craft a creative, non-traditional, innovative approach Appeal to new donors 2012 Case Challenges Campaign

2004 THEN:

2004 THEN NOW $18M Goal

2012 NOW:

2012 NOW

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$17M Goal $1-2M lead gift for 1 of 10 initiatives No Leaders Identified until late 2005 2004 THEN: Note: Tending the Garden Campaign, launched in 2006, exceeded the goal, raising $18.7M; Co-Chairs presented last year at this conference

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$1M committed from 1 donor $.3M request pending First Choice Leadership Chair, currently pending $1M+ request to 4 donors “teed up” NOW: $18M Goal

Beverly Duzik Director of Development Desert Botanical Garden 480-481-8111 bduzik@dbg.org:

Beverly Duzik Director of Development Desert Botanical Garden 480-481-8111 bduzik@dbg.org

Common Experiences and Common Challenges in Case Development:

Common Experiences and Common Challenges in Case Development

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A winning Campaign Case will: Advance your brand Show the campaign is not “business as usual” Answer four basic questions: Why your institution? Why these projects? Why now? Why me (your donor)? Campaign Communications

Making the Case:

Making the Case Step 1: Set the Stage Give reader the reason they need to keep reading Develop a glimpse of what the world is like today because you exist. Allow the reader to visualize a scene. What are people doing? Who’s present? What are the signs of excitement, hope, etc.?

Making the Case:

Step 2: State the Need What’s happening in your world that everyone should care about? The “need” is not the dollar goal of the campaign. The “need” is the societal problem your program, once funded, will address. Making the Case

Making the Case:

Making the Case Step 3: Introduce your Solution Outline what your organization can do to respond to the problem better than others . Be specific. Describe how you intend to measure outcomes—how will you know when you’ve been successful ? What difference will “the world” notice? Why does it need to happen now—what’s the urgency ?

Making the Case:

Step 4: Affirm your Qualifications Go into greater depth about your organization. Who’s in charge? What’s your mission, and how do you know you’re achieving it? What are some meaningful accomplishments? What makes this place unique? What’s your current budget, where do those funds come from, and is anything changing? Making the Case

Making the Case:

Step 5: Move the Reader to Take Action Describe what you need from supporters. What action should the reader take? What are the next steps? Try to anticipate questions about timing, due diligence, the planning process, planning assumptions, alternate sources of funds and their reliability. Making the Case

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Sometimes, however, developing the Case can get just a little challenging….

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A culture of philanthropy is not well developed in the organization. Possible Solution – With CEO support, educate board and employees. Increase internal publicity on philanthropy. Final project/initiative decisions by administration continue to be delayed and delayed. Possible Solution : Must wait until ready. Sometimes volunteer leaders can be helpful. Top Ten Challenges Inadequate administrative prep .

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3. When projects are finally selected, their features and benefits are only vaguely defined – the impact is not clear. Possible Solution : Use planning/feasibility study to confirm that feedback. Projects have limited philanthropic appeal. Possible Solution : Volunteer leader and feasibility study feedback to administration is critical. Top Ten Challenges

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5. Project funding mix (and consequent need for philanthropy) not clear. Possible Solution : Again, volunteer leader and feasibility study feedback to administration is critical. 6. Board support for projects highly variable (lip service support or active opposition). Possible Solution : Full Board support is critical. Select different projects or Chair must resolve with resistant members. Top Ten Challenges

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Board/administration want organization-centered case, not impact on community-focus. Possible Solution : Fundraising professional and/or consultant must educate. Case too factual or too emotional. Possible Solution : Write carefully and test tone in feasibility study. Top Ten Challenges

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Board members/steering committee/CEO over-edit text = “written by a committee” result. Possible Solution : Consultant provides guidance or, sometimes, LIVE with it. Top Ten Challenges

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10. Marketing department wants to transform Case into marketing brochure (we’re great already !). Possible Solution : Get CEO permission for interface – help marketing understand how approaches can blend (We ARE great, but we’re going to be even BETTER!). Together, you help make organization stronger by ensuring messages link /mutually support. Top Ten Challenges

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Now get writing! Questions?

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Beverly Duzik Joan Thomas, CFRE About Us As Director of Development for the Desert Botanical Garden, Beverly is responsible for leading the office of philanthropy staff in planning, developing and managing the Garden’s contributed income and membership activities that support the operating fund, endowment program, and strategic initiatives. Since joining the Garden staff in September 2000, Beverly secured significant community support and marketing resources which helped the Garden double local attendance and membership; and most recently she planned and implemented the successful $16M Tending the Garden campaign, which exceeded the goal with $17.8M in recorded pledges. Beverly has 28 years of experience in non-profit management in Arizona, including 12 years as Executive Director of the Phoenix Boys Choir (1984-96) and 3 years as Director of Major Gifts for the American Cancer Society’s Southwest Division (1996-1999). As a former Peer Consultant for Arizona Commission on the Arts, she has facilitated board retreats for 17 organizations around the state. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Converse College in Spartanburg, S.C. and did graduate work in interdisciplinary humanities at Arizona State University. In 2009 she received the Outstanding Professional Fundraiser Award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals Greater Arizona Chapter. Joan Thomas joined Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales, FL in 2009 as Director of Development. She lived previously in Charlotte, NC where she served as Director of Development at the Charlotte Symphony and later as administrator of an $80M campaign for Wingate University. She has 23 years of fundraising experience and has served on the board of the AFP-West Michigan Chapter, as well as planning committees for National Philanthropy Day and the League of American Orchestras national conferences. She has held the CFRE (Certified Fund Raising Executive) accreditation since 2002. A native of New Jersey who grew up in St. Petersburg, FL, Ms. Thomas graduated from St. Olaf College (B.A. Music) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (M.A. Business-Arts Administration). As director of development, first with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and then the Kalamazoo (MI) Symphony Orchestra, she significant increased contributed income and launched planned giving programs. while spearheaded a successful endowment campaign initiated by a Ford Foundation grant. She is currently involved in Bok Tower Gardens’ first comprehensive capital campaign in its 83-year history. Willard White, PhD Jon McGann, PhD Willard is Senior Consultant & Principal and Co-leader, Arts & Culture Practice Group with Marts & Lundy. He joined Marts & Lundy in 2004, bringing with him thirty years experience in the nonprofit sector as college teacher, fundraiser, senior manager and fundraising consultant. Willard joined the Campaign staff at the University of Chicago in 1976, and served as executive director of development for Illinois Institute of Technology, and vice president for institutional advancement at The Field Museum of Chicago. At these institutions, Willard helped design and execute fund drives that realized over $900 million in total gifts from private sources. In 1991, Willard was recognized by the Association of Fundraising Professionals with the Benjamin Franklin Award for career success in development. In 2001, Willard was elected to the board of the Illinois Humanities Council and serves on the Council’s Executive Committee. Willard joined the Board of Governors of the Yemen College of Middle Eastern Studies, Sana’a, Republic of Yemen. He served on the Marts & Lundy Board of Directors from 2007 – 2010. Willard received his B.A. from Denison University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from The University of Chicago. Jon McGann came to Corporate DevelopMint with a background that included several years’ experience as a senior-level administrator in human service non-profit organizations. That experience was then broadened through his work as a management consultant for a variety of for-profit companies. As Senior Planning and Research Consultant, Jon is integrally involved in a wide variety of the firm’s projects, including the development of Corporate DevelopMint’s new product modules and accompanying training manuals. Jon also works extensively with boards and senior administration on projects that range from vision/mission development and strategic planning to fundraising project definition/prioritization and “ask” training. Jon often serves as lead consultant for campaign planning studies, is a key study interviewer, and oversees the development of all cases for support. As the firm’s research expert, Jon also designs and implements all Corporate DevelopMint statistically-based research projects, including a ground-breaking and ongoing study of the drivers of fundraising success. Jon’s educational background includes a Bachelors of Arts from Ohio Wesleyan University and both a Master of Arts and a Doctorate in Psychology from Southern Illinois University.

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