HIckman Mills Moving Forward

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PowerPoint Presentation:

Superintendent’s Key Recommendations for the 2014-2015 School Year

Current District Challenges:

Current District Challenges Year two of provisional accreditation District’s overall academic performance is stagnant Only 3% of 2013 graduates were College and Career Ready according to the ACT College & Career Readiness Benchmarks, compared to 27% for Missouri

Current District Challenges:

Current District Challenges School Disciplinary Concerns Student Attendance Concerns Current grade level configurations are not conducive to student’s academic and social success Currently serving less than 50% of the community’s four year old children

Current District Challenges:

Current District Challenges Six Schools in Various Stages of State Directed School Improvement : Priority School (performing in the lowest 5% of the state ‘s Title I Schools) Smith-Hale Focus Schools (performing in the lowest 10% of the state ‘s Title I Schools) Hickman Mills Johnson Ruskin Santa Fe OTIS School (Title I schools identified by the state as having multiple risk factors) Symington *Based on current data the District is providing additional support and monitoring for Burke and Dobbs

District Initiatives Being Implemented to Address Challenges:

District Initiatives Being Implemented to Address Challenges Governance Leadership Team (Board/Administration) focused on student achievement and teacher effectiveness One Year Blueprint Five Year Strategic Plan Data Driven Leadership (Data Teams and Tyler Pulse )

District Initiatives Being Implemented to Address Challenges:

District Initiatives Being Implemented to Address Challenges Focus on Research-Based Instructional Strategies Intensive Professional Development Benchmark Assessments Enhanced Attendance Protocols Stakeholder Task Force Groups Monthly Leadership Team Meetings Focused on Teaching and Learning

How Do We Address Our Current Challenges Moving Forward?:

Provide Early Learning Opportunities For All Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K) Students Revise Grade Level Configurations Implement a secondary alternative education program that promotes high levels of social, academic, and behavioral growth/achievement for identified students How Do We Address Our Current Challenges Moving Forward?

How do these Initiatives Align with the Five Year Strategic Improvement Plan?:

How d o t hese Initiatives A lign with the Five Year Strategic Improvement Plan?

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Mission The mission of the Hickman Mills C-1 School District, a proudly diverse and historic community, is to provide a foundation for our students that maximizes academic success and fosters civic engagement, as distinguished by: Highly effective teaching focused on rigor and individual student needs Building strong family, community and school partnerships Collaborative and data-driven decision making The integration of technology across the curriculum and the district Commitment to early childhood and ongoing college and/or career preparation

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Community Beliefs We believe that every child can learn. We believe that individual learning needs matter. We believe that all stakeholders are entitled to a safe, secure and respectful environment. We believe that all children have a right to an equitable and high quality education . We believe that positive and meaningful partnerships are essential to student success.

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Parameters We will not allow personal agendas or special interests to adversely affect our pursuit of excellence. We will only engage in actions that further our mission.

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Objectives All students pass local, state and national assessments at levels which exceed establish standards. All students graduate and succeed in higher education and/or workplace, and the community . All students are responsible citizens who demonstrate good character and the highest ethical standards. All students attend school at a rate that exceeds state and national expectations.

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Strategies We will guarantee a challenging learning environment for all students to become successful members of the community. We will actively engage in positive partnerships with all stakeholders.

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Providing Early Learning Opportunities For Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K) Students

Opportunity:

Opportunity President Barack Obama has proposed the Preschool for All Program for children coming from low to middle class households Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has stated that universal preschool is the surest path to the middle class for children who live two standard deviations below the poverty line Governor Jay Nixon’s proposed budget for next fiscal year includes monies that could more than triple funding for the Missouri Preschool Project (MPP)

Opportunity:

Opportunity Students participating in a high-quality Pre-K program are better prepared for kindergarten Multiple studies suggest that for every dollar a community spends on Pre-K education, the return to individuals and the general public is four to nine dollars.

Research has shown that the early years in a child’s life—when the human brain is forming—represent a critically important window of opportunity to develop a child’s full potential and shape key academic, social, and cognitive skills that determine a child’s success in school and in life. www.whitehouse.gov/issues/education/early-childhood :

Research has shown that the early years in a child’s life—when the human brain is forming—represent a critically important window of opportunity to develop a child’s full potential and shape key academic, social, and cognitive skills that determine a child’s success in school and in life . www.whitehouse.gov/issues/education/early-childhood Opportunity

Brain Development :

Brain Development http:// training.aedi.org.au /images/ ui -assets/development1.jpg Experiences Shape Brain Architecture 700 new neural connections per second in the early years

Pre-K: Full Day Vs. Half Day:

Pre-K : Full Day Vs. Hal f Day Research indicates that students who attend full day preschool programs, in high-poverty districts, who are far behind when entering preschool, can develop vocabulary, math, and literacy skills that are close to national norms. Added hours of preschool education were substantially effective at closing the achievement gap between urban children and their more advantaged peers. Children in quality full day Pre-K programs showed an increase of about 11-12 standard points on vocabulary and math skills, while children in quality half day programs improved only 6-7 standards points on vocabulary and math. www.nieer.org/resources/research/IsMoreBetter.pdf

District Benefits for Early Childhood:

District Benefits for Early Childhood Provide access to high-quality preschool for ALL children Attending a preschool program positively influences children’s social-emotional development More children provided with higher levels of literacy, vocabulary, and math experiences Allows for greater academic coordination between Pre-K and Kindergarten educators Exposure to high-quality preschools “significantly impact everything from reading at grade level to graduating high school to career ready later in life.” Source: AP/Rogelio V. Solis

Hickman Mills C-1 Kindergarten Literacy Data:

Hickman Mills C-1 Kindergarten Literacy Data

Superintendent’s Recommendation for Early Childhood Education:

Superintendent’s Recommendation for Early Childhood Education Hickman Mills will educate all four year olds in the district, (approximately 600) as distinguished by: A full day instructional program that services our students five days a week Utilizing Freda Markley Early Childhood Center to its full capacity (approximately 300 students) Repurposing Ervin Middle School as Ervin Early Learning Center to serve approximately 300 pre-k students, and all of the district’s kindergarten students (approximately 550).

Renovation Possibilities and Budgetary Considerations:

Renovation Possibilities and Budgetary Considerations Kirk Horner, Hollis and Miller Greg Bricker, George K. Baum

Ervin Middle School Repurpose Early Learning Center:

Ervin Middle School Repurpose Early Learning Center Our Team with the District’s team have met 3 times and have toured the facility: Overall Building is in good shape for a renovation Roofing needs are critical to schedule Some minor ADA Compliancy Restrooms for younger Children

Ervin Middle School Repurpose Early Learning Center:

Ervin Middle School Repurpose Early Learning Center Discovery: Adequate Quantity of Classrooms (51+) Adequate circulation for students and staff Potential for New Safe and Secure Entry Skylights in every classroom provide daylight Opportunities for Age Appropriate Design Changes

Ervin Middle School Repurpose Early Learning Center:

Ervin Middle School Repurpose Early Learning Center SCHEDULE: Schools Open August 20, 2014 Staff moves into renovated facility August 6, 2014 Construction Complete August 1, 2014 Construction Starts: March 13 – Performance Contracting April 18 – General Construction Approval from BOE to continue working with H&M to solidify construction plans. February 20, 2014 DELIVERY: Performance Contract: BOE Approval March 12, 2014 Mechanical Controls Fire Sprinklers Limited Demolition General Demolition Package BOE Approval March 12, 2014 Roofing Package BOE Approval March 12, 2014 Design Bid Build All General Construction Packages Playgrounds Abatement (By District) BOE Approval March 12, 2014

Budgetary Considerations for Ervin Early Learning Center Operational Costs:

Budgetary Considerations for Ervin Early Learning Center Operational Costs More closely align district expenditures in the area of early childhood with the district’s current average expenditure per pupil Re-Allocation of some federal funds (Title I and IDEA) to cover new expenditures Re-Allocation of some district staff based on 2014-2015 staff allocation guidelines Increased DESE funding based on increased participation in the state’s early childhood special education program

Bond Schedules :

Bond Schedules

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Revising Grade Level Configurations

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HMC-1 Current Grade Level Configurations

Opportunity:

Opportunity A 2007 Duke study (Cook, MacCoun , Muschkin , & Vidgor ) describes sixth grade as a major crossroads of a child's development and found that sixth graders in elementary school behave and test better than sixth graders in middle school. Approximately 12% of fifth grade students in the HMC-1 School District do not persist to sixth grade in the district.

HMC-1 Cohort Enrollment from 5th Grade to 6th Grade:

HMC-1 Cohort Enrollment from 5th Grade to 6th Grade 5th Grade 6th Grade Net Loss 2009-10 470 2010-11 434 36 2010-11 472 2011-12 438 34 2011-12 407 2012-13 386 21 2012-13 449 2013-14 389 60

Attendance :

Attendance www.educationnext.org , ( Rockoff , and Lockwood)

6th Grade Behavior :

6 th Grade Behavior Sixth graders placed in middle schools have more discipline problems and lower test scores than their peers who attend elementary schools (Duke University, 2007). In addition, the negative effects of grouping sixth graders with older students are lasting and persist at least through ninth grade (Duke University, 2007)

Test Scores :

Test Scores ( Rockoff , and Lockwood) www.educationnext.org ,

HMC-1 5th and 6th Grade Discipline Incidents 2010-2014:

HMC-1 5th and 6th Grade Discipline Incidents 2010-2014

Opportunity:

Opportunity Students are 3-5 times more likely to fail a class in the ninth grade than students in any other grade (Southern Regional Educational Board, 2002 ). Declining achievement during the transition to high school impacts decisions to drop out of school ( Balfanz , 2009 ).

Opportunity :

Opportunity Student achievement declines between middle school and high school ( Allensworth & Easton, 2005 ). Behavior problems resulting in suspension or expulsion increase significantly early in the ninth grade (Jerald, 2006 ). Students who do not complete high school have little chance of sustaining themselves or a family in today’s economy (Turner, 2007 ).

HMC-1 Freshmen On-Track To Graduation :

HMC-1 Freshmen On-Track To Graduation Research indicates students who fail 2 or more courses during their ninth grade year are at-risk of not graduating with their cohort 2011 2012 2013 2014 Total # of Students 450 425 488 483 On-Track 203 45.1% 265 62.4% 272 55.7% 319 66.0% 1 F 48 10.7% 54 12.7% 81 16.6% 71 14.7% 2 or More Fs 199 44.2% 106 24.9% 135 27.7% 93 19.3%

Grades 9-12 Drop Out Rate for 2008-2013:

Grades 9-12 Drop Out Rate for 2008-2013

Superintendent’s Recommendation for Realignment of Grade Levels:

Superintendent’s Recommendation for R ealignment of Grade L evels Hickman Mills will realign the placement of grade levels to best serve the achievement needs of our students as distinguished by: Creation of a Freshman Center focused on the specific needs of freshman students, and to provide a high level of support in their transition to high school Sixth grade students remaining at the elementary schools, where research shows they are more successful academically

How Will Keeping Sixth Graders In The Elementary Schools Better Prepare Our Students for Success?:

How Will Keeping Sixth Graders In The Elementary Schools Better Prepare Our Students for Success? Increase enrollment (5th → 6th) Improve behavior Improve attendance Improve academic success Stronger connection to the school community

How will the Freshman Center Better Prepare Our Students for Their Future?:

How will the Freshman Center Better Prepare Our Students for Their Future? Begin transition activities to Freshman Center in 8th grade Improve Behavior A required Freshman Seminar Course A required Career Exploration Course Focus on the unique academic, social, and emotional needs of ninth grade students through building strong relationships Create a culture that prepares students for success in high school Improve graduation rate

Budgetary Considerations:

Bud getary Considerations One time expenditures for curricular and extracurricular resources

PowerPoint Presentation:

Implementing a Secondary Alternative Education Program

Opportunity:

Opportunity A growing number of students do not find success in traditional high school programs. A mismatch between learner and learning system should prompt schools to question whether traditional schools are at risk of failing students ( Kerka , 2003 ). According to Knutson and College (2006), students perceive the standard high school as a place that lacks relevance; therefore, they drop-out. Alternative Education Programs provide diverse learners, who are not successful in the traditional setting, the opportunity to be successful in a supportive, non-traditional learning environment where they can grow academically, socially and emotionally. Quality Alternative Education Programs provide instructional methods to fit the varied learning rates and styles of learners.

Opportunity :

Opportunity There are students in the district who are best served in an alternative placement due to their unique learning needs and/or life circumstances Disruptive behaviors that lead to suspension Failing grades and loss of credit Truancy/Low Attendance Teen Parenting Meeting Family Economic Needs

Secondary Alternative Programs Examined:

Secondary Alternative Programs Examined Star Academy (Cougar Academy) Hickman Mills in-school program Credit Recovery Independent-learning program, utilizing PLATO software, at Hickman Mills and Ruskin Twilight Ruskin after school program Legacy Off-site placement as a result of Superintendent Hearing

Concerns with Current Alternative Programs:

Concerns with Current Alternative Programs Disjointed & Non-cohesive Cost prohibitive Inconsistent Limited instructional models Poor attendance Low expectations Low retention of assigned students

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Number of Students Served *2013-14 data as of January 30, 2014

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Superintendent Discipline Hearings

Secondary Alternative Program Expenditures:

Secondary Alternative Program Expenditures * 2013-14 Expenditures are projected for the entire school year

Superintendent’s Recommendation for Implementing a Secondary Alternative Education Program:

Superintendent’s Recommendation for Implementing a Secondary A lternative Education P rogram Hickman Mills will provide an alternative education, to secondary students with unique needs and/or life circumstances, as distinguished by: A program that provides a high-quality, rigorous curriculum Increased graduation rates for students in the alternative setting Attendance within the program that meets the expectation of the state’s accountability system

Comprehensive Alternative Program (Ombudsman Educational Services):

*Credit Recovery will be scaled back, not completely eliminated Twilight Legacy Star Academy Credit Recovery* Comprehensive Alternative Program (Ombudsman Educational Services) Superintendent’s Recommendation for Implementing a Secondary Alternative Education Program

District Benefits:

District Benefits One comprehensive alternative program Learning environments which meet the needs of all students Increased achievement , attendance and graduation rate of students in alternative programs

Alternative Programs Investigated:

In-House Alternative Program Ombudsman Educational Services Pros Cons Pros Cons Aligned to District curriculum District staff Smaller class size Increased learner engagement Credit recovery Strong student-teacher relationships Low stress environment Time necessary to implement Cost prohibitive Identification & training of staff Facilities/Location Traditional classroom setting Traditional scheduling Stigma attached to attending an alternative program Aligned to district curriculum Proven success and ready to implement Open Learning Center, off- site Differentiated, personalized instruction Technology-rich instruction Ombudsman staff Ombudsman location Flexible scheduling Smaller class size Fixed Costs Increased learner engagement Strong student-teacher relationships Separation from the home school Stigma attached to attending an alternative program Alternative Programs Investigated

Ombudsman Educational Services Presentation:

Ombudsman Educational Services Presentation Phyllis Lucia, Senior Vice President Ralph Thompson, Vice President

Presentation for the Hickman Mills C-1 School District February 12, 2014 :

Presentation for the Hickman Mills C-1 School District February 12, 2014

PowerPoint Presentation:

An alternate route … Ombudsman partners with school districts to provide an alternate route to graduation to at-risk students, by offering an environment that is non-traditional, a climate that is non confrontational, with a supportive, mentoring/coaching staff . Ombudsman …. Increases the district’s graduation rate, improves overall academic achievement of students, provides measurable growth in attendance Results … 100% of students referred to Ombudsman are at risk of dropping out, 84% of students graduated, successfully returned to their district or completed their enrollment period with Ombudsman; many potential drop-outs become high school graduates. Ombudsman Educational Services

Environment Average Student:

Environment Average Student Flex classroom model Highly structured day One hour per activity (MS) ¾ of an hr. per activity (HS) Low staff-to-student ratio On or off site learning centers Staff trained in PBIS/CPI Support positions A verage length of stay 78 days 7.3 Math 6.4 Reading 10 th Grade

Blended Learning:

Blended Learnin g The Middle School, Rotation Model offers a stronger emphasis on more teacher-led instruction and less computer-assisted learning than Choice, Flex Model.

Curriculum Alignment and Resources:

Curriculum Alignment and Resources Alignment to Common Core and/or State Standards Clear and consistent standards to prepare students for college and career success Using Curriculum Unit, implement learning process and activities for a core subject area

Superintendent Recommendations and Timeline for Board Action:

Superintendent Recommendations and Timeline for Board Action

Superintendent’s Recommendations for 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action :

Superintendent’s Recommendations for 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action The Superintendent would ask the Board to support continued work to solidify construction and funding plans that would allow the district to complete the renovations at Ervin Middle School necessary to open the Ervin Early Learning Center at the start of the 2014-2015 school year . No later than the February 20 th Board Meeting

Superintendent’s Recommendations and for 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action :

Superintendent’s Recommendations and for 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action The Superintendent recommends entering into architectural services, construction, and performance contracting agreements as needed to complete renovations at Ervin Middle School. March and/or April 2014 The Superintendent will recommend Board action as necessary to secure the funding needed for the Ervin Middle School renovation March and/or April 2014

Superintendent’s Recommendations for the 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action:

Superintendent’s Recommendations for the 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action The Superintendent recommends approval of the proposed grade configuration effective at the start of the 2014-2015 school year : Pre-K at Freda Markley Early Childhood Center Pre-K & Kindergarten at current Ervin Middle School Grades 1-6 at each elementary school Grades 7-8 at Smith-Hale Middle School Grade 9 at current Hickman Mills Jr. High School Grades 10-12 at Ruskin High School Requesting BOE action during the March 12th Work Session Meeting

Superintendent’s Recommendations and for 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action:

Superintendent’s Recommendations and for 2014-2015 School Year and Timeline for Board Action The Superintendent recommends contracting with Ombudsman Educational Services to provide a comprehensive alternative education option for 6-12 grade students effective at at the start of the 2014-2015 school year. Requesting BOE action during the March 12th Work Session Meeting

Questions and/or Comments:

Questions and/or Comments

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