Topic and Sentence Outlines

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Topic and Sentence Outlines :

Topic and Sentence Outlines

What is an Outline?:

What is an Outline ? An outline is a formal system used to think about and organize your paper.

There are two major types of outline::

There are two major types of outline: Topic Outline Sentence Outline

Topic Outline:

Topic Outline A topic outline arranges your ideas hierarchically (showing which are main and which are sub-points), in the sequence you want, and shows what you will talk about.

TOPIC OUTLINE . . . Next, Cathy developed a thesis and a topic outline-an outline that lists topic ideas in the form of phrases or single words in the headings. :

TOPIC OUTLINE . . . Next, Cathy developed a thesis and a topic outline-an outline that lists topic ideas in the form of phrases or single words in the headings. Thesis : Because our family has a variety of hobbies and interests, we get a lot of junk mail that we treat like junk. I. Definition of junk mail A. Bulk rate postage B. Advertising II.. Hobbies and interests of the family A. Woodworking B. Investing C. Gardening and camping III. Lists sold by companies A. Farm, fleet, work clothes catalogs B. Financial brochures C. Camping, clothing, and gardening catalogs IV. Junk mail as junk A. Clutter B. Garbage

Sentence Outline:

Sentence Outline The sentence outline is done in full sentences. It is normally used when your paper focuses on complex details. The sentence outline is especially useful for this kind of paper because sentences themselves have many of the details in them. A sentence outline also allows you to include those details in the sentences instead of having to create an outline of many short phrases that goes on page after page.

Before you begin creating your sentence outline, you should be clear about the following::

Before you begin creating your sentence outline, you should be clear about the following : Brainstorm: List all the ideas that you want to include in your paper onto notecards (gathered through research, either through reading or direct research). Organize: Group related ideas together. Order : Arrange material in subsections from general to specific or from abstract to concrete (e.g., organize the groups notecards into logical order). Label: Create main and sub headings for each group.

Benefits of writing a sentence outline. :

Benefits of writing a sentence outline. Clarity Flow of argument Efficiency Writing to length Time

Sentence Outline Cathy decides that the topic outline isn't adequate for her needs because she wants better control of her paragraphing. She makes a sentence outline where she can see every idea in its complete form. She has found that a formal outline is useful when she wants to organize a paragraph deductively, going from the general (topic sentence) to the specific examples and details as she eventually does in her paper on junk mail. :

Sentence Outline Cathy decides that the topic outline isn't adequate for her needs because she wants better control of her paragraphing. She makes a sentence outline where she can see every idea in its complete form. She has found that a formal outline is useful when she wants to organize a paragraph deductively, going from the general (topic sentence) to the specific examples and details as she eventually does in her paper on junk mail. Thesis: Because our family has a variety of hobbies and interests, we get a lot of junk mail that we treat like junk. I. junk mail is a particular kind of mail. (paragraph) A. junk mail goes for "bulk rate." B. junk mail consists of advertising or soliciting brochures. II. The hobbies and interests of our family reflect the kind of junk mail we receive. (paragraph) A. My father is a woodworker, so he gets everything connected with carpentry. B. My mother is an investor in stocks and bonds, so she gets investment brochures. C. I once had a garden, so I get garden catalogs. D. I ordered something from L. L. Bean, so now I get sporting goods catalogs from all over. III. The companies we order from have sold their lists of customers. (paragraph) A. My father gets farm and fleet catalogs as well as work clothes catalogs. B. My mother gets invitations to "make a million." C. I get every conceivable kind of catalog related to clothing, camping, and gardening. IV. We treat the catalogs like junk. (paragraph) A. We seldom look at them. B. We throw them in the garbage. Conclusion: As a result of all our junk mail, our family has reduced the number of things that they order by mail and have taken to buying from the local stores  

Make the Outline :

Make the Outline 1. Identify the topic The topic of your paper is important. Try to sum up the point of your paper in one sentence or phrase. This will help your paper stay focused on the main point. 2.Identify the main categories. What main points will you cover? The introduction usually introduces all of your main points, then the rest of paper can be spent developing those points. 3.Create the first category. What is the first point you want to cover? If the paper centers around a complicated term, a definition is often a good place to start. For a paper about a particular theory, giving the general background on the theory can be a good place to begin. 4.Create subcategories. After you have the main point, create points under it that provide support for the main point. The number of categories that you use depends on the amount of information that you are going to cover; there is no right or wrong number to use

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