1. CHCECE009 USE AN APPROVED LEARNING FRAMEWORK TO GUIDE.pptx v2

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CHCECE009 USE AN APPROVED LEARNING FRAMEWORK TO GUIDE PRACTICE :

CHCECE009 USE AN APPROVED LEARNING FRAMEWORK TO GUIDE PRACTICE

Slide2:

Subject Purpose The assessment tasks within this unit provide you with the opportunity to demonstrate evidence of the required knowledge and skills to provide children with opportunities to maximise their potential and develop a foundation for future success. Elements The following elements define the essential outcomes of this unit: Element 1 Identify  learning  frameworks Element 2 Apply the  learning framework

Slide3:

To successfully complete this subject you must complete Quiz Question in Cert III CHCECE009 Use an approved learning framework to guide practice Part 1 CHCECE009 Use an approved learning framework to guide practice Part 2 Diploma CHCECE009 Use an approved learning framework to guide practice

Core documents for this subject :

Core documents for this subject Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority. (2011). Guide to the Education and Care Services National Law and the Education and Care Services National Regulations. ACT: Commonwealth of Australia. Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority. (2011). Guide to the National Quality Standard. ACT: Commonwealth of Australia. Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (2009). Belonging, Being and Becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia. Canberra: DEEWR. Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (2010). Educators’ Guide to the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia. Canberra: DEEWR.

How to read the Guide to the education & care National Law & national Regulation :

How to read the Guide to the education & care National Law & national Regulation

Educational program:

Educational program The National Law and National Regulations require an approved service to provide a program that is: • based on an approved learning framework • delivered in accordance with that framework • based on the developmental needs, interests and experiences of each child, and • takes into account the individuality of each child.

The educational program should contribute to the following outcomes::

The educational program should contribute to the following outcomes: • children have a strong sense of identity. • children are connected with and contribute to his or her world. • children have a strong sense of wellbeing. • children are confident and involved learners. • children are effective communicators.

There are two national approved learning frameworks: :

There are two national approved learning frameworks: Belonging , Being and Becoming—The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia My Time, Our Place—Framework for School Age Care in Australia.

There are also jurisdiction-specific declared approved learning frameworks::

There are also jurisdiction-specific declared approved learning frameworks: • Australian Capital Territory: Every Chance to Learn—Curriculum Framework for ACT Schools Preschool to Year 10 • Victoria: Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework, Department of Education and Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority • Western Australia: Curriculum Framework for Kindergarten to Year 12 Education in Western Australia • Tasmania: Tasmanian Curriculum, Department of Education of Tasmania, 2008 . All other States and Territories use Belonging, Being and Becoming—The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia

being:

being Childhood is a time to be, to seek and make meaning of the world. Being recognises the significance of the here and now in children’s lives. It is about the present and them knowing themselves, building and maintaining relationships with others, engaging with life’s joys and complexities , and meeting challenges in everyday life. The early childhood years are not solely preparation for the future but also about the present. “If you want to be a mermaid you can imagine” – Jazmine

Belonging :

Belonging Experiencing belonging – knowing where and with whom you belong – is integral to human existence. Children belong first to a family, a cultural group, a neighbourhood and a wider community. Belonging acknowledges children’s interdependence with others and the basis of relationships in defining identities . In early childhood, and throughout life, relationships are crucial to a sense of belonging. Belonging is central to being and becoming in that it shapes who children are and who they can become. “You belong in your house with your family” – Dong

Becoming :

Becoming Children’s identities, knowledge, understandings , capacities , skills and relationships change during childhood . They are shaped by many different events and circumstances. Becoming reflects this process of rapid and significant change that occurs in the early years as young children learn and grow. It emphasises learning to participate fully and actively in society . “When you keep planting plants you become a gardener” – Olivia

pedagogy:

pedagogy The term pedagogy refers to the holistic nature of early childhood educators’ professional practice ( especially those aspects that involve building and nurturing relationships), curriculum decision-making , teaching and learning. When educators establish respectful and caring relationships with children and families, they are able to work together to construct curriculum and learning experiences relevant to children in their local context. These experiences gradually expand children’s knowledge and understanding of the world.

Professional judgement :

Professional judgement Educators’ professional judgements are central to their active role in facilitating children’s learning . In making professional judgements, they weave together their : professional knowledge and skills knowledge of children, families and communities awareness of how their beliefs and values impact on children’s learning personal styles and past experiences . They also draw on their creativity, intuition and imagination to help them improvise and adjust their practice to suit the time, place and context of learning .

Theories about early childhood:

Theories about early childhood Early childhood educators draw upon a range of perspectives in their work which may include: developmental theories that focus on describing and understanding the processes of change in children’s learning and development over time socio-cultural theories that emphasise the central role that families and cultural groups play in children’s learning and the importance of respectful relationships and provide insight into social and cultural contexts of learning and development socio-behaviourist theories that focus on the role of experiences in shaping children’s behaviour critical theories that invite early childhood educators to challenge assumptions about curriculum , and consider how their decisions may affect children differently post-structuralist theories that offer insights into issues of power, equity and social justice in early childhood settings.

Principles :

Principles Early Years Learning Framework

1. Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships:

1. Secure, respectful and reciprocal relationships Educators who are attuned to children’s thoughts and feelings, support the development of a strong sense of wellbeing. They positively interact with the young child in their learning. Educators who give priority to nurturing relationships and providing children with consistent emotional support can assist children to develop the skills and understandings they need to interact positively with others.

2. Partnerships :

2. Partnerships Learning outcomes are most likely to be achieved when early childhood educators work in partnership with families. Educators recognise that families are children’s first and most influential teachers . They create a welcoming environment where all children and families are respected and actively encouraged to collaborate with educators about curriculum decisions in order to ensure that learning experiences are meaningful . Partnerships also involve educators, families and support professionals working together to explore the learning potential in every day events, routines and play so that children with additional needs are provided with daily opportunities to learn from active participation and engagement in these experiences in the home and in early childhood or specialist settings. In genuine partnerships, families and early childhood educators : • value each other’s knowledge of each child • value each other’s contributions to and roles in each child’s life • trust each other • communicate freely and respectfully with each other • share insights and perspectives about each child • engage in shared decision-making .

3. High expectations and equity:

3. High expectations and equity Early childhood educators who are committed to equity believe in all children’s capacities to succeed , regardless of diverse circumstances and abilities. Children progress well when they, their parents and educators hold high expectations for their achievement in learning. Educators recognise and respond to barriers to children achieving educational success. In response they challenge practices that contribute to inequities and make curriculum decisions that promote inclusion and participation of all children. By developing their professional knowledge and skills , and working in partnership with children, families , communities, other services and agencies , they continually strive to find equitable and effective ways to ensure that all children have opportunities to achieve learning outcomes.

4. Respect for diversity:

4. Respect for diversity There are many ways of living, being and of knowing. Children are born belonging to a culture, which is not only influenced by traditional practices , heritage and ancestral knowledge, but also by the experiences , values and beliefs of individual families and communities. Respecting diversity means within the curriculum valuing and reflecting the practices , values and beliefs of families. Educators honour the histories , cultures, languages, traditions, child rearing practices and lifestyle choices of families. They value children’s different capacities and abilities and respect differences in families’ home lives. Educators recognise that diversity contributes to the richness of our society and provides a valid evidence base about ways of knowing. For Australia it also includes promoting greater understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of knowing and being . When early childhood educators respect the diversity of families and communities, and the aspirations they hold for children, they are able to foster children’s motivation to learn and reinforce their sense of themselves as competent learners. They make curriculum decisions that uphold all children’s rights to have their cultures, identities , abilities and strengths acknowledged and valued, and respond to the complexity of children’s and families ’ lives. Educators think critically about opportunities and dilemmas that can arise from diversity and take action to redress unfairness. They provide opportunities to learn about similarities and difference and about interdependence and how we can learn to live together.

5. Ongoing learning and reflective practice:

5. Ongoing learning and reflective practice Educators continually seek ways to build their professional knowledge and develop learning communities . They become co-learners with children , families and community, and value the continuity and richness of local knowledge shared by community members , including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders. Reflective practice is a form of ongoing learning that involves engaging with questions of philosophy, ethics and practice. Its intention is to gather information and gain insights that support, inform and enrich decision-making about children’s learning. As professionals , early childhood educators examine what happens in their settings and reflect on what they might change. Critical reflection involves closely examining all aspects of events and experiences from different perspectives . Educators often frame their reflective practice within a set of overarching questions, developing more specific questions for particular areas of enquiry

How to reflect? What to reflect on?:

How to reflect? What to reflect on? What are my understandings of each child? What theories, philosophies and understandings shape and assist my work? Who is advantaged when I work in this way? Who is disadvantaged? What questions do I have about my work? What am I challenged by? What am I curious about ? What am I confronted by? What aspects of my work are not helped by the theories and guidance that I usually draw on to make sense of what I do? Are there other theories or knowledge that could help me to understand better what I have observed or experienced? What are they? How might those theories and that knowledge affect my practice?

Practice :

Practice Early Years Learning Framework

1. Holistic approaches:

1. Holistic approaches Recognises the connectedness of mind, body and spirit Pays attention to the children’s physical, personal, social, emotional, and spiritual wellness as well as cognitive aspects of learning Plan and assess with a focus on a particular outcome or component of learning See children’s learning as integrated and interconnected Recognise the connection between children, families and communities and the importance of reciprocal relationships and partnerships for learning See learning as a social activity Connecting with a child’s natural world Respects the natural environment

2. Responsiveness to children:

2. Responsiveness to children Respond to all the children’s strengths, abilities and interests Builds on strengths, skills and knowledge to ensure their motivation and engagement in learning Respond to children’s expertise, cultural traditions and ways of knowing, the multiple languages spoken by some children, particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, and the strategies used by children with additional needs to negotiate their every day lives. Responsive to children’s ideas and play, which form an important basis for curriculum decision-making Response to children’s evolving ideas and interests, educators assess , anticipate and extend children’s learning via open ended questioning, providing feedback, challenging their thinking and guiding their learning. Make use of spontaneous ‘teachable moments ’ to scaffold children’s learning. Responsiveness enables educators to respectfully enter children’s play and ongoing projects, stimulate their thinking and enrich their learning.

3. Learning through play :

3. Learning through play Play provides opportunities for children to learn as they discover, create, improvise and imagine . create social groups, test out ideas, challenge each other’s thinking and build new understandings. children can ask questions , solve problems and engage in critical thinking . expand children’s thinking and enhance their desire to know and to learn. In these ways play can promote positive dispositions towards learning . simply enjoy being. Educators share conversations with children to extend their thinking, provide a balance between child led, child initiated and educator supported Explore, problem solve, create, construct, build attachments, create spontaneous teachable moments, promote and model, challenge unfair judgements, build caring, fair, inclusive learning communities.

4. Intentional teaching:

4. Intentional teaching Intentional teaching is deliberate, purposeful and thoughtful . Educators who engage in intentional teaching recognise that learning occurs in social contexts and that interactions and conversations are vitally important for learning. They actively promote children’s learning through worthwhile and challenging experiences and interactions that foster high-level thinking skills. They use strategies such as modelling and demonstrating, open questioning , speculating , explaining, engaging in shared thinking and problem solving to extend children’s thinking and learning. Educators move flexibly in and out of different roles and draw on different strategies as the context changes. They plan opportunities for intentional teaching and knowledge-building. They document and monitor children’s learning

5. Learning environments:

5. Learning environments Learning environments are welcoming spaces when they reflect and enrich the lives and identities of children and families participating in the setting and respond to their interests and needs. Environments that support learning are vibrant and flexible spaces that are responsive to the interests and abilities of each child. They cater for different learning capacities and learning styles and invite children and families to contribute ideas, interests and questions. Outdoor learning spaces are a feature of Australian learning environments - natural environments include plants, trees, edible gardens , sand, rocks, mud, water and other elements from nature, invite open-ended interactions , spontaneity, risk-taking, exploration , discovery and connection with nature. Indoor and outdoor environments support all aspects of children’s learning and invite conversations between children, early childhood educators , families and the broader community . They promote opportunities for sustained shared thinking and collaborative learning. Digital technologies can enable children to access global connections and resources, and encourage new ways of thinking we need a sustainable future and promote children’s understanding about their responsibility to care for the environment. They can foster hope, wonder and knowledge about the natural world. Educators can encourage children and families to contribute ideas, interests and questions to the learning environment, support engagement by allowing time for meaningful interactions, by providing a range of opportunities for individual and shared experiences, and by finding opportunities for children to go into and contribute to their local community .

6. Cultural competence:

6. Cultural competence Educators who are culturally competent respect multiple cultural ways of knowing, seeing and living, celebrate the benefits of diversity and have an ability to understand and honour differences. This is evident in everyday practice when educators demonstrate an ongoing commitment to developing their own cultural competence in a two way process with families and communities. Educators view culture and the context of family as central to children’s sense of being and belonging , and to success in lifelong learning. Educators also seek to promote children’s cultural competence. Cultural competence is much more than awareness of cultural differences. It is the ability to understand , communicate with, and effectively interact with people across cultures. Cultural competence encompasses : • being aware of one’s own world view • developing positive attitudes towards cultural differences • gaining knowledge of different cultural practices and world views • developing skills for communication and interaction across cultures

7. Continuity of learning and transitions:

7. Continuity of learning and transitions Children bring family and community ways of being , belonging and becoming to their early childhood settings . By building on these experiences educators help all children to feel secure, confident and included and to experience continuity in how to be and how to learn. Transitions, including from home to early childhood settings , between settings, and from early childhood settings to school, offer opportunities and challenges . Different places and spaces have their own purposes, expectations and ways of doing things . Building on children’s prior and current experiences helps them to feel secure, confident and connected to familiar people, places, events and understandings. Children , families and early childhood educators all contribute to successful transitions between settings. In partnership with families, early childhood educators ensure that children have an active role in preparing for transitions. They assist children to understand the traditions, routines and practices of the settings to which they are moving and to feel comfortable with the process of change. Early childhood educators also help children to negotiate changes in their status or identities , especially when they begin full-time school. As children make transitions to new settings ( including school ) educators from early childhood settings and schools commit to sharing information about each child’s knowledge and skills so learning can build on foundations of earlier learning. Educators work collaboratively with each child’s new educator and other professionals to ensure a successful transition.

8. Assessment for learning (1 of 2):

8. Assessment for learning (1 of 2) Assessment for children’s learning refers to the process of gathering and analysing information as evidence about what children know, can do and understand . It is part of an ongoing cycle that includes planning, documenting and evaluating children’s learning. It is important because it enables educators in partnership with families, children and other professionals to: • plan effectively for children’s current and future learning • communicate about children’s learning and progress • determine the extent to which all children are progressing toward realising learning outcomes and if not, what might be impeding their progress • identify children who may need additional support in order to achieve particular learning outcomes , providing that support or assisting families to access specialist help • evaluate the effectiveness of learning opportunities , environments and experiences offered and the approaches taken to enable children’s learning • reflect on pedagogy that will suit this context and these children. Educators use a variety of strategies to collect, document , organise, synthesise and interpret the information that they gather to assess children’s Learning, in appropriate ways to collect rich and meaningful information that depicts children’s learning in context, describes their progress and identifies their strengths, skills learning strategies that children use and reflect ways in which learning is co-constructed through interactions between the educator and each child. and understandings. They must be culturally and linguistically relevant and responsive to the physicial and intellectual capabilities of each child

8. Assessment for learning (2 of 2):

8. Assessment for learning (2 of 2) When educators reflect on their role in children’s learning and assessment they reflect on their own views and understandings of early childhood theory , research and practice to focus on: • the experiences and environments they provide and how that links to the intended learning outcomes • the extent to which they know and value the culturally specific knowledge about children and learning that is embedded within the community in which they are working • each child’s learning in the context of their families, drawing family perspectives, understandings , experiences and expectations • the learning opportunities which build on what children already know and what they bring to the early childhood setting • evidence that the learning experiences offered are inclusive of all children and culturally appropriate • not making assumptions about children’s learning or setting lower expectations for some children because of unacknowledged biases • incorporating pedagogical practices that reflect knowledge of diverse perspectives and contribute to children’s wellbeing and successful learning • whether there are sufficiently challenging experiences for all children • the evidence that demonstrates children are learning • how they can expand the range of ways they assess to make assessment richer and more useful .

A look at Eylf Document:

A look at Eylf Document OUTCOME 5: CHILDREN ARE EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATORS • Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes • Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts • Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media • Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work • Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking What Educators do to promote learning in this area Children are achieving this Learning outcome when they demonstrate these things The Learning Outcome Number:

Planning for Facilitating and monitoring children’s learning:

Planning for Facilitating and monitoring children’s learning The Early Years Learning Framework identifies three types, or levels, of outcomes for planning for, facilitating and monitoring all children’s learning: • belonging, being and becoming are the big picture aims, or level 3 outcomes • the five Learning Outcomes with their 19 sub elements are broad , longer term goals of integrated competencies, processes , understandings and dispositions , or level 2 outcomes • points of evidence are the shorter term objectives and are often discrete skills or content, or level 1 outcomes that enable children to achieve the Learning Outcomes .

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Level 2 5 Learning Outcomes with their 19 sub elements Level 3 Being, Belonging & Becoming • Children feel safe, secure, and supported • Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency • Children develop knowledgeable and confi dent self identities • Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect • Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation • Children respond to diversity with respect • Children become aware of fairness • Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment • Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing • Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing • Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence , creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and refl exivity • Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating • Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another • Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials • Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes • Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts • Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media • Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work • Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking OUTCOME 3: CHILDREN HAVE A STRONG SENSE OF WELLBEING OUTCOME 4: CHILDREN ARE CONFIDENT AND INVOLVED LEARNERS OUTCOME 5: CHILDREN ARE EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATORS OUTCOME 1: CHILDREN HAVE A STRONG SENSE OF IDENTITY OUTCOME 2: CHILDREN ARE CONNECTED WITH AND CONTRIBUTE TO THEIR WORLD Level 1 Point of evidence.

Curriculum decision making: :

Curriculum decision making: Curriculum encompasses all the interactions, experiences, routines and events, planned and unplanned, that occur in an environment designed to foster children’s learning and development (Framework, p.9 ). Developing meaningful curriculum involves interactive decision making by children, parents and families , educators and the broader community with the aim of fostering children’s learning. Curriculum decision making is guided by a combination of principles , practices and outcomes to promote children’s learning .

National quality standard area 1: educational program & practice:

National quality standard area 1: educational program & practice Quality Area 1 provides a strong focus on enhancing children’s learning and development through the: • pedagogical practices of educators and co-ordinators • development of programs that promote children’s learning across five learning outcomes.

What we aim to achieve with standard 1.1:

What we aim to achieve with standard 1.1 Working in partnership with families, educators and co-ordinators use the learning outcomes to guide their planning for children’s learning (Early Years Learning Framework, page 9). They make curriculum decisions that uphold all children’s rights to have their cultures, identities , abilities and strengths acknowledged and valued and respond to the complexity of children’s and families’ lives (Early Years Learning Framework, page 14 ). Working in collaboration with children and in partnership with families, educators and co-ordinators use the outcomes to guide their planning for children’s wellbeing (Framework for School Age Care, page 6).

Reflect :

Reflect Reflect on your professional knowledge , which includes your knowledge of each child and family and children’s strengths and interests. Reflect on what the children and families are bringing/contributing , saying, doing. Reflect on different cultures, ways of knowing and being. Reflect on what the group and overall community priorities are for your setting. Collate and show evidence of this thinking.

Question :

Question How can we use children’s prior learning, interests and strengths in conjunction with the Learning Outcomes to guide planning for children’s learning? How are we working in partnership with families to plan for children’s learning? How can we engage children actively in learning ? What are appropriate teaching strategies/practices ? How are we holding high expectations that all children will be successful learners? How are we striving for effective and equitable ways , ensuring that each child has opportunities to achieve the Learning Outcomes?

plan:

plan Plan for children’s holistic learning using the Learning Outcomes. Plan the pedagogical learning environment and teaching strategies, using the Practices and Principles of the Framework. Design and set up the physical learning environment . Plan for ways to monitor and assess children’s learning consistent with the Principles and Practices of the Framework.

act:

act Engage with children and families using relevant scaffolds. Co-construct meaning with children – ensure there are sustained interactions and thinking experiences with all children in secure , respectful and reciprocal relationships. Take a supportive role in children’s play , guided by the Framework’s Practice Learning through Play. Model and promote enabling learning dispositions . Listen and respond to the children’s voices. Monitor and reflect on children’s learning and pedagogical practices and refine as you go.

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