Individualized Instruction Module

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Individualized Instruction Module:

Individualized Instruction Module

Individualized Instruction Not originally for Special Education:

Individualized Instruction Not originally for Special Education By examining the history of education the development and presentation of instruction can be seen as it changed and grew throughout the last few century’s. Molenda (2012) stated: “The 20th century brought mass education , a more industrial mode of schooling in which standardized whole-group instruction predominated. The tradeoff for reaching masses was a loss in personalization and reduced effectiveness for many. There were some notable efforts to breakaway from the group mode .” (p. 1).

Individualized Instruction Not originally for Special Education:

Individualized Instruction Not originally for Special Education The original mode of instruction started as one to one tutoring, which then changed into education for the masses. Again, the pendulum began to swing and educators strived to find effective ways to meet each student’s individual needs. The idea of Individualized Instruction was born. ( Molenda , 2012) To learn more about the history of individualized i nstruction, read “Individualized Instruction: A Recurrent Theme” By Michael Molenda This article is part of the resource section at the end of this module.

Individualized Instruction We need that right? :

Individualized Instruction We need that right? When the field examines special education practices, it is equally important to speak to individualized instruction and the implications it holds. Brantlinger (2005) examines the basis of special education which the field refers to as individualized instruction. One of the main components of special education is being able to provide students who are determined to be below age level with one to one instruction, also known as individualized instruction.

Individualized Instruction We need that right?:

Individualized Instruction We need that right? While it sounds as though the special educators are able to work one on one with students in his or her class often, Brantlinger points out that the average teacher in special education works less than five hours per week in a one to one setting with students (2005). Often times, the field places more staff in special education rooms, but the work may not be truly individualized.

Individualized Instruction We need that right?:

Individualized Instruction We need that right? Modifications may be made to lessons and work, but as Brantlinger points out “one on one instruction, then, is impossible and “individualized instruction” amounts to differentiated but nevertheless indirect teaching through worksheet packets or personally assigned workbooks and texts (e. g., independent seat work).” (p. 127).

Individualized Instruction We need that right?:

Individualized Instruction We need that right? Brantlinger attributes her statements to over 20 years as a field work supervisor who has spent thousands of hours in special education classrooms. This is another example of where the field states children with disabilities needs a specific service or strategy that is not what it is believed to actually be. Educators must once again ask themselves if students with disabilities are really better off in segregated special education classrooms.

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? :

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? Is it the way the education system disseminates the message that lead teachers to believe some can provide this while others cannot?

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction?:

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? Assuming all educators realize the important of individualized instruction, and special education credential programs focus on their teachers learning this in depth and being able to provide this, could this not be taught to general educators? Is our education system sending the message to general educators that they are not “trained” to do this? These are all questions we must ask ourselves .

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction?:

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? In an article by Kosko & Wilkins (2009) they posit that it may be general education teachers self-efficacy that shape their ability to provide strategies such as Individualized Instruction, or work within a student’s IEP.

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction?:

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? “Teachers who have little or no professional development in teaching students with special needs have significantly less positive attitudes concerning inclusion than those with extensive professional development ( Avramidis & Kalyva , 2007 ). College coursework is often seen as ineffective or of little value in instruction, and teachers have relatively few hours in professional development workshops on inclusion ( DeSimone & Parmar , 2006b ).” Kosko & Wilkins (2009)

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction?:

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? “The resulting effect is teachers who do not believe they are adequately prepared to instruct students with disabilities ( DeSimone & Parmar , 2006b; Maccini &Gagnon, 2006). Teachers’ teaching efficacies, or their belief about themselves as teachers, have been shown to be a strong predictor of their actions in the classroom (Jerald, 2007).” Kosko & Wilkins (2009) Kosko & Wilkins (2009)

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction?:

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? “Teachers with high self-efficacies are more likely to meet the needs of their students. Therefore , a teacher with a low teaching efficacy is not likely to have teaching behaviors that positively impact students ( Allinder , 1995; Berman,McLaughlin , Bass, Pauly , & Zellman , 1977; Bogler & Somech , 2004; Guskey , 1988; Stein & Wang , 1988 ).” Kosko & Wilkins (2009)

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction?:

Can only Special Educators provide Individualized Instruction? “As the number of students with learning disabilities (LD) in general education classrooms increases, we must ask ourselves if there is progress in teachers’ preparedness to teach students with LD. The current study seeks to answer this question: In what way does the amount of training and experience relate to general education teachers’ self-perceived skills in adapting instruction for students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs)?” (p. 1 ). Kosko & Wilkins (2009)

Quiz:

Quiz Ready to practice what you’ve learned? Of course you are! Don’t worry, you will not be graded!

Question:

Question How do educators often define Individualized Instruction?

Answer:

Answer One to one instruction with individualized work to meet that particular student’s needs.

Question:

Question What is often seen when it comes to individualized instruction in special education classes?

Answer:

Answer More staff and work that is often modified or adapted for the student’s needs, but not necessarily individualized .

Question:

Question Where can true individualized instruction be executed? Who can provide individualized instruction?

Answer:

Answer Anywhere! Anyone trained to do so!

Question:

Question Was individualized instruction developed specifically for special education?

Answer:

Answer No. Individualized instruction has been around since the beginning of education. Some may say it was the beginning of education .

Question:

Question Should the ability to provide individualized instruction be a reason for a student with a disability to stay in a segregated classroom?

Answer:

Answer No!

Question:

Question Who can benefit from Individualized Instruction?

Answer:

Answer Anyone that one to one instruction works well for as a learning strategy!

References/Recommended Readings :

References/Recommended Readings Brantlinger , E. (2005). Slippery shibboleths: The shady side of truisms in special education. In S. L. Gabel (Ed.), Disability studies in education: Readings in theory and method (pp. 125-138). New York, United States of America: Peter Lang . Copple , C., & Bredekamp , S. (1997). Developmentally appropriate practice [journal article]. National Association for the Education of Young Children, 352 . Kosko , K. W., & Wilkins, J. L. (2009, Fall). General educators’ in-service-training and their self-perceived ability to adapt instruction for students with IEPs. The Professional Educator , 33 (2). Molenda , M. (2012, November/December). Individualized instruction: A recurrent theme. TechTrends , 56 (6), 12-14.

authorStream Live Help