TPM TRAINING ppt

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1: 

TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE

Slide 2: 

STRUCTURE Introduction Overview of Eight Pillars Understanding Losses Autonomous Maintenance Kobetsu Kaizen ( Focused Improvement) Planned Maintenance Quality Maintenance Training & Education Office TPM Initial Flow Control Safety, Health & Environment

Slide 3: 

Introduction

Slide 4: 

What is TPM ? Why TPM ? How Does TPM Fit –in at Anand ? How do we Implement TPM ?

Slide 5: 

What Is TPM

Slide 6: 

TPM TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE TOTAL PEOPLE MANAGEMENT TOTAL PROFIT MANAGEMENT TOTAL PERFECT MANAGEMENT Concept Developed By JAPAN INSTITUTE OF PLANT MAINTENANCE First introduced and successfully implemented in 1971 at M/S NIPPON DENSO CO., LTD., JAPAN.

Slide 7: 

Meaning of T-P-M T - TOTAL Total Efficiency Maximisation Total Lifecycle of Production System Total Manpower Coverage P - PRODUCTIVE Productivity Maximisation by : Zero Breakdown Zero Accident Zero Defect M - MAINTENANCE Maintenance Covers Life Cycle Of Production System: Individual Processes Plants Prod. Management System

Slide 8: 

Why TPM ?

Slide 9: 

Lean Transformation TPM JIT Six Sigma

Slide 10: 

WHY TPM REQUIRED ? DUE TO WORST ECONOMIC CONDITIONS SEVERE COMPITITION FOR COST WE NEED TO ELIMINATE BREAKDOWN ELIMINATE ACCIDENT ELIMINATE DEFECTS ELIMINATE WASTE RESULT SAFE WORK ENVIRONMENT INCREASED PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVED QUALITY REDUCED MANUFACTURING COST JOB SECURITY IMPROVED SKILLS

Slide 11: 

TPM Is a Team Effort Team at Anand Begins with CS Patel and Works it’s way through all employees Including the New Recruits of Today Small Teams are Taking over Responsibilities Once Handled Exclusively By Managers and Supervisors

Slide 12: 

What Can Be Expected ? Productivity : Value added improvement 1.5 to 2 times 40 % reduction in Breakdowns Overall Equipment Efficiency up 1.5 to 2 times Quality : Reduction in Work in progress (WIP) defects. Reduction in Parts Per Million (PPM) Cost : Production Cost reduced by 30% Quality Cost reduced by 30%

Slide 13: 

What Can Be Expected ? Delivery: Reduced finished goods inventory by 50% 100% on-time delivery Reduced premium freight by 60% Safety & Morale : Zero accidents. 5 – 10 suggestions per employee Education : Skill upgrading of employee

Slide 14: 

JIPM Awards For Excellence VIKRAM CEMENT SUNDARAM FASTENERS TANFAC BIRLA TYRES UNILEVER INDO GULF GRASIIM UNILEVER USHA BELTRON UNILEVER TATA METALICS VIKRAM CEMENT TANFAC INDO GULF UNILEVER

Slide 15: 

8 Pillars of TPM TPM FOCUSSED IMPROVEMENT PLANNED MAINTENANCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT EDUCATION & TRAINING AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE QUALITYMAINTENANCE OFFICE TPM SAFETY HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT

Slide 16: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS

Slide 17: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE

Slide 18: 

AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE Daily inspection Lubrication Minor repair Parts replacement Trouble shooting Accuracy checks Aiming at achieving and keeping ONE’S OWN EQUIPMENT IN GOOD CONDITION BY ONE SELF Is the activities which each operator performs

Slide 19: 

WHY CHANGE IS REQUIRED?

Slide 20: 


Slide 21: 

CHANGE THE BITTER COMPLAINTS WHICH COME FROM ……... “PRODUCTION” “MAINTENACNE” Maintenance does not know its job. They take too long to fix the equipment. This equipment is so old, no wonder it breaks down. We are too busy to do vital daily inspection. We are not meeting target because of break downs. They don’t know how to operate. We get lot of repairs so we don’t have ample time to do a real corrective maintenance. We repair the standards, but they don’t do the checking. Machines are not available for P.M.

Slide 22: 

PREVIOUS CONCEPT : I manufacture - You repair I manufacture - You check I manufacture - You lubricate CHANGING CONCEPT : “ If equipment changes - people will change If people change - shop will change.” PRESENT CONCEPT : ONE’S OWN EQUIPMENT IN GOOD CONDITION BY ONE SELF

Slide 23: 

JISHU HOZEN ONE’S OWN EQUIPMENT IN GOOD CONDITION BY ONE SELF MAINTAIN ONE’S OWN EQUIPMENT BY ONE SELF CALLED AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE MEANS

Slide 24: 

No break down. Satisfaction.

Slide 25: 

Easy to identify abnormalities. Esteem

Slide 26: 

Increase in business

Improvement of Chronic Losses : 

Improvement of Chronic Losses Chronic Loss Unforeseen Loss Restoration Counter Measures Reformist Counter Measures Least Optimum Loss

Zero BreakdownApproach : 

Zero BreakdownApproach Forced Deterioration Natural Deterioration Inspn. Inspn. Inspn. Inspn. Restoration Time Function Autonomous Maintenance Planned Maintenance Extended Life Cycle Early Equipment Management

Slide 29: 

Increase in business

Slide 30: 

JISHU HOZEN METHODOLOGY

Slide 31: 

MOTIVATION CHANGE IN EQUIPMENT CONDITION AND APPEARANCE ENJOY THE FRUITS OF SEPT1 STEP2 STEP3 TOTAL CHANGE IN MORRALE OF EMPLOYEE Change in thinking DEFECTS & FAILURES can made zero FRUITS : ZERO DEFECTS AND FAILURES ARE REALISED CHANGE IN THE SHOP FLOOR BY MY MACHINE CAMPAGIN STEP 0 STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 STEP 4 STEP 5 STEP 6 STEP 7 -Think & act -The process of actions is headspring of motives -Why does forced deterioration occur? -Need of JH -Rectify "fugai"(Defect) -Cleaning is inspection -Inspection is a step to find defects -Fugai should & could be eliminated. -Enhance the ability to find and improve fugai - Restoration and Kaizen are a kind of success - Success is a pleasure as a result of achievement Unless success can be seen, the thinking will not change - Bottom up from circle activities - Autonomous Kaizen by operators Challenge for making zero defects and thoroughness in analysis Concept of JISHU HOZEN

Slide 32: 

Jishu – Hozen (steps for developing) 0. Motivation and Training 1. Initial Cleaning 2. Countermeasures for Sources of problems and Difficult places 3. Establishing tentative standards for “JH” 4. Overall Inspection 5. Autonomous Inspection 6. Standardization 7. Autonomous Management Steps Activities

Slide 33: 

STEP - 1 CLEAN WITH CLEANING Step - 1

Slide 34: 

Jishu - HozenSteps for developing 1. Initial Cleaning (inspection) All- around clean-up of dust and dirt on equipment. Oiling and re-tightening of bolts and nuts Finding and elimination of “Fuguai” (abnormalities) Step - 1

Slide 35: 

Development of first step of JH for equipment Step - 1

Types of Deterioration : 

Types of Deterioration Natural Deterioration Forced Deterioration Ageing under Standard Operating Conditions Artificially Accelerated because of Non-Standard Operating Conditions Breakdown Attracts Breakdown !

Slide 37: 

TPM IN GIL JISHU - HOZEN Step - 1

Slide 38: 

..…if you do not clean a machine …..it will become dirty and …..its operation will be adversely affected Why Clean ?… Step - 1

Slide 39: 

The harmful effects of inadequate cleaning Dirty conditions create equipment breakdowns · The equipment is generally very dirty · Cutting chips scattered in and around the machine · The equipment is leaking. · Cutting oil is scattered around · People don’t mind seeing dirt and grime piling up everywhere (they think it is normal) Step - 1

Seven Big Losses : 

Seven Big Losses Breakdown Defects Minor Stoppages C/Over & Adj Tool Change Reduced Speed Start-up Loss ------------ Cumulative % -------------- 100 % 0 %

Slide 41: 

Equipment Failure Statistic 37% of Equipment Failure Are Due To Poor Lubrication Management

Slide 42: 

Equipment Failure Statistic 12% of Equipment Failure Are Due To Dirt And Poor Clean-Up Habits

Slide 43: 

Cleaning consists of removing old dust, dirt, grime, oil, grease and other contaminants that adhere to equipment and accessories , in order to expose defects. Therefore the more thorough the cleaning and the more frequent it is carried out the better the chance of spotting minor defects on the machine and eliminating them before they develop into serious defects So Cleaning is ………. Step - 1

Slide 44: 

UNCOVER ---- DISCOVER Step - 1

Slide 45: 

Key points of cleaning for Clean Regularly as inspection Clean thoroughly Open Previously ingrained guards and covers and expose and remove every spec of dirt Clean attachments and accessories e.g. conveyors lubrication ? Clean again and again … note parts which get dirty quickly …? How difficult to clean? … only improvements to prevent dirt Step - 1

Slide 46: 

INITIAL CLEANING KEY POINTS Cleaning with Meaning Cleaning for Inspection Inspection means finding problems Identification of abnormalities Step - 1

Slide 47: 

7 TYPES OF ABNORMALITIES 1.MINOR FLAWS 2.UNFULFILLED CONDITIONS 3.INACCESSIBLE PLACES 4.CONTAMINATION SOURCES 5.QUALITY DEFECT SOURCES 6.UNNECESSARY AND NON-URGENT ITEMS 7.UNSAFE PLACES Step - 1

Slide 48: 

ABNORMALITIES EXAMPLES Step - 1

Slide 49: 

ABNORMALITIES EXAMPLES Step - 1

Slide 50: 

ABNORMALITIES EXAMPLES Step - 1

Slide 51: 

ABNORMALITIES Step - 1

Slide 52: 

WHAT TO CHECK ? Loose bolts & nuts. Loose wires. Missing parts. Rusted parts. Broken parts. Cracked parts. Air leaks Oil leaks Coolant leaks. Dirt, dust and cobwebs. Oil on the floor. Scrap around the machine. Burr and swarf around the machine. Abnormal heat. Abnormal sound. Abnormal vibration. Step - 1

Slide 53: 

Step - 1

Slide 54: 

Step - 1

Slide 55: 

Types of tags White Tags For activities that are to be done by the team. Red Tags For activities that requires maintenance /TSG / External help. Step - 1

Slide 56: 

Types of tags White Tags Step - 1 Red Tags

Slide 57: 

Types of tags

Slide 58: 

Types of tags White Tags Step - 1 Red Tags

Slide 59: 

Types of tags

Slide 60: 

Step - 1

Slide 61: 

Step - 1

Slide 62: 

Step - 1

Slide 63: 

Step - 1

Slide 67: 

Jishu - HozenSteps for developing 2. Countermeasures for sources of problems and difficult places Eliminate causes for dirt and dust. Improve places which are difficult to clean, lubricate, and re-tightening of bolts and nuts. Reduce time for clean-up and oiling. Step - 2

Slide 68: 

OIL IN THE FLOOR !!!!!! Step - 2

Slide 69: 

STEP - 2 CLEAN WITHOUT CLEANING Step - 2

Slide 70: 

FIND THE ROOT CAUSE OF OIL LEAKAGE AND ELIMINATE . Step - 2

Slide 71: 

Localized guards Step - 2

Slide 72: 

Step - 2

Slide 73: 

EASY TO CLEAN Step - 2 BEFORE AFTER

Slide 74: 

DIFFICULT TO LUBRICATE – EASY TO LUBRICATE Step - 2 BEFORE AFTER

Slide 75: 

DIFFICULT TO INSPECT – EASY TO INSPECT Step - 2 BEFORE AFTER

Slide 76: 

DIFFICULT TO INSPECT – EASY TO INSPECT Step - 2 BEFORE AFTER

Slide 77: 

A GABRIEL INDIA LTD. KAIZEN IDEA - SHEET DEFECT : B C WE ARE NOT CHECKING: WE ARE NOT ABLE TO CHECK: Kaizen category: Cleanliness. Problem: Coolant leakage Regn.No.: Sub comm.: Year Sl.No.: Unit Kaizen Start : 05.11.02 Kaizen Finish : 05.11.02 Problem/Before status : 1) Coolant Leakage on platform from The component after Machining Counter measure/After improvements : 1.Water leakage arrested, by providing the Collection box . Analysis : Results : 1. Coolant leakage on platform arrested Team members : SHIVANAND This Kaizen is Reversible Ir-reversible Updated in Process sheet JH Check sheet PM Checklist Eqpt./Fixture Drawing QM Check sheet Scope and plan for Horizontal Deployment: Sl.No Item Tgt. Date Response Status 1 FF 15/11/02 JH IF IT IS POKA-YOKE WHAT TYPE & FUNCTION Prevention Detection Shut down Warning IDEA : Eliminating Coolant leakage on plat form. 2001-02 F.FORK Plan for sustaining: Coolant leakage on platform Coolant falling from the Component Component carrying the Coolant after Machining JH 10

Slide 78: 

A GABRIEL INDIA LTD. KAIZEN IDEA - SHEET DEFECT : B C WE ARE NOT CHECKING: WE ARE NOT ABLE TO CHECK: Kaizen category: Productivity Problem: Operator fatigue. Regn.No.: Sub comm.: Year Sl.No.: Unit Kaizen Start : 02.11.02 Kaizen Finish : 02.11.02 Problem/Before status : 1) Door opening and closing for each job manually, by operator Counter measure/After improvements : Local guard provided for coolant Splash8ing, and avoided coolant splashing Analysis : Manual operation of door Coolant Splashing on operator Earlier design Results : Operator fatigue reduced Team members : BHK,Andrews This Kaizen is Reversible Ir-reversible Updated in Process sheet JH Check sheet PM Checklist Eqpt./Fixture Drawing QM Check sheet Scope and plan for Horizontal Deployment: Sl.No Item Tgt. Date Response Status IF IT IS POKA-YOKE WHAT TYPE & FUNCTION Prevention Detection Shut down Warning IDEA: Provide Localized Guard 2002-03 FF Key word: Plan for sustaining: 1. Check for the Local guard condition 0197 KK

Slide 79: 

A GABRIEL INDIA LTD. KAIZEN IDEA - SHEET DEFECT : B C WE ARE NOT CHECKING: WE ARE NOT ABLE TO CHECK: Kaizen category: Cleanliness. Problem: water leakage Regn.No.: Sub comm.: Year Sl.No.: Unit Kaizen Start : 08.10.02 Kaizen Finish : 08.10.02 Problem/Before status : 1) Water leakage on platform from The component after Leak testing Counter measure/After improvements : 1.Water leakage arrested, by providing the Collection box . Analysis : Results : 1. Water leakage on platform arrested Team members : S.Chandrashekar This Kaizen is Reversible Ir-reversible Updated in Process sheet JH Check sheet PM Checklist Eqpt./Fixture Drawing QM Check sheet Scope and plan for Horizontal Deployment: Sl.No Item Tgt. Date Response Status 1 FF 15/11/02 JH IF IT IS POKA-YOKE WHAT TYPE & FUNCTION Prevention Detection Shut down Warning IDEA : Eliminating water leakage on plat form. 2001-02 F.FORK Plan for sustaining: Water leakage on platform Water falling from the Component Component carrying the water after leak testing JH 9

Slide 80: 

Jishu - HozenSteps for developing 3. Establishing Tentative Standards for “Jishu-Hozen” Make temporary procedures or manual of Autonomous Maintenance for cleanup, lubrication, re-tightening, checkups. (Specify the time allocation for various maintenance daily or regularly held.) Step - 3

Slide 81: 

Step - 3

Slide 82: 

Step - 3

Slide 83: 

Safety precautions during cleaning

Slide 84: 

Switch of the power supply to the machine Remove fuses from the Plug-in box Adhere to location allocated to each person Use safety equipment ( gloves, aprons, goggles…)

Slide 85: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE

Slide 86: 

Pillar : Planned Maintenance Aim : Realise efficiency in maintenance department to eliminate 8 major losses Method: Daily Maintenance TBM, CBM, Improvement for increasing the Service life expectancy, control for replacement of parts, failure Analysis and prevention of re-occurrence, lubrication control Who : Staff and cell leaders

Slide 87: 

Planned Maintenance (steps for developing) Analysis – Basic & usage condition Present State, Selection of priority parts 2. Improvement – Difference Basic & usage Condition Present state/ Present maint. Method Prepare standards : Basic & Usage Conditions Extension of service life Improvement : Inspection and Maintenance Efficiency Overall Equipment Diagnosis 7. Use Equipment to Limits Steps Activities

Slide 88: 

Maintenance information management Maintenance spare part management Maintenance cost management Maintenance work planning and management Activities to enhance the equipment availability Activities to extend the MTBF of equipment Activities to curtail the MTTR of equipment Activities to conduct maintenance efficiently Guidance and assistance activities to Jishu hozen Corrective maintenance activities M P Activities 7 Step activities for Planned maintenance Input Reduction Study on predictive maintenance Improvement of output - ZERO BAD Establishment of planned Maint: system Concept of planned Maintenance system

Evolution of the Maintenance Role : 

Evolution of the Maintenance Role Preventive / Predictive Maintenance Opportunity The Role of the Operators (Autonomous Maintenance) The Role of the Maintenance (Planned Maintenance) TPM Stages Understanding Positive Perception Institutionalisation

Slide 90: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE KOBETSU KAIZEN (FOCUSED IMPROVEMENT)

Slide 91: 

Pillar : Kobetsu Kaizen Aim : Realising for high production efficiency by eliminating 16 major losses Method: Recognition of 16 major losses Over all equipment efficiency, material , die, jig, tool and energy req. per unit calculation and setting targets for the above. Analysis of phenomenon and review of the associated factors Execution of PM analysis Through pursuit of “what the equipment and production must be” Who : Staff and cell leaders

Slide 92: 

Kobetsu Kaizen (steps for developing) Select Model Line / Equipment / Process Organise Project Teams 3 Grasp Present Losses Kaizen Theme & Goal Setting 5. Mapping out Kaizen Plan 6. Mapping out & Evaluation of Analysis & Counter Measure 7. Implementation of Kaizen 8. Confirm effects 9. Prevent Recurrence 10. Horizontal Replicate Steps Activities

2 : 

16 Major Losses Which Obstruct Production Efficiency 8 Major Losses Obstructing Equipment Efficiency 5 Major Losses Obstructing Manpower Efficiency 3 Major Losses Obstructing Material & Energy Utilisation 2

Slide 94: 

8 MAJOR EQUIPMENT LOSSES The 8 major factors which might obstruct efficient utilization of Equipment are mentioned below.we refer to these factors as the “8 major losses”. Equipment failure losses Set-up & adjustment losses Cutting blade and jig change loss Start-up loss Minor stoppage & idling loss Speed loss Defect & rework loss Shutdown (SD) loss

Slide 95: 

1.EQUIPMENT FAILURE LOSS The largest factor which obstructs efficiency is the Equipment Failure loss The failure can be classified into two types : One is the Function stoppage type and Other is the Function-deterioration type. The Function-stoppage type failure is one which occurs unexpectedly, while the function-deterioration type failure is the one in which the equipment function decreases.

Slide 96: 

2. SET-UP & ADJUSTMENT LOSS . This loss is usually caused by stoppage due to set-up change.The Set-up change time is the period during which the production is Stoppage to prepare for subsequent production.The factor which spends the most time is “ Adjustment ” Example : Set up change from victor to scooty in main cell. Set up change from LH to RH, Drum brake to Disk brake

Slide 97: 

3. CUTTING BLADE CHANGE LOSS The cutting blade change loss is caused by the line stoppage for replacing the grinding wheel,cutter,bit etc.which might be broken or worn due to long service Example : 1) Gas cylinder replacing in main cell 2) Weld wheel replacement in VSW 3) BTA tool change and adjustment in 5T 4) Insert changing in CNC machines 5) Drill change in machines

Slide 98: 

4 .START-UP LOSS The start-up loss is one that occurs until the start-up, running-in and machining conditions of the equipment have been stabilized Example: Time required from start of the boiler to starting of job painting

Slide 99: 

5. MINOR STOPPAGE & IDLING LOSS The minor stoppage loss differs from failure and is the one in which temporary troubles causes the equipment to stop or idle.It might be called a “ Minor trouble ”. For example,idling of a line caused by a low supply of Work in the chute due to clogging ,and temporary lines stops caused when the sensor detects the non-conforming product are examples of minor stoppage loss.These losses can be eliminated and the line returned to normal operation so long as the clogged work is removed.The losses are quite different from natural equipment failure losses Example: 1) Time loss due to loading of component in Auto Loader

Slide 100: 

6. SPEED LOSS The speed loss is the loss caused by the difference between the designed speed and the actual working speed For example,when the line was operated at the designed speed , it was found that the line caused poor quality or mechanical trouble in the line.In that case, the line had to be run at a slower speed than the designed one.This loss from this situation is called a Speed loss Example: Reducing slide feeds due to tooling and casting problem Reducing feed rate in grinding machines.

Slide 101: 

7. DEFECT & REWORK LOSS This is the loss caused when defects are found and have to be reworked.In general,the defects are likely to be considered as waste which should be disposed off.But since even the reworked products need wasted manpower to repair them,this must be considered as the loss Example : Regrinding of Inner tube, piston rod. Dismantling and reassembly of piston rod, damper, shox Paint touch up at shox final assembly. Rework in VSW for leakages

Slide 102: 

8. SD ( shutdown) loss This loss is referred to as line shut-down loss, which is caused by stopping the equipment for periodical maintenance / inspection, and for scheduled shutdown for legal inspection during the production stage. Example : Planned shutdown for preventive maintenance, TPM activity other than Sunday. 2) Planned shutdown due to no load

Slide 103: 

5 MAJOR MANPOWER LOSSES As losses which obstruct the efficient operation of the workers there are 5 losses, as stated below.These are called the 5 Major manpower losses. Management Loss Operation motion Loss Line organisation Loss Logistics Loss Measurement and Adjustment Loss

Slide 104: 

1.MANAGEMENT LOSS Management loss is waiting losses,such as awaiting material awaiting trolley , awaiting tools,awaiting instructions,and awaiting repair,which are generated through management problems Example : Power failure No man power

Slide 105: 

2. OPERATING MOTION LOSS Operating motion loss is the man power loss which is generated by the skill level difference in the set-up & adjustment operation,tool and jig change operation and so forth.The loss which is caused by skill level difference in the loading and unloading of the work is also included in this loss category Example : Time difference between actual time and standard time for set up change, tool change, wheel change.

Slide 106: 

3. LINE ORGANISATION LOSS Line organisation loss is the loss resulting from the worker Having to work on more than one piece of equipment at the same time , including loss caused by improper line organisation Example: Difference in cycle time between 2T & 5T.

Slide 107: 

4. LOGISTICS LOSS Logistics loss is the man hours spent in doing logistics work (transportation of products or raw materials,etc.) by other logistics workers, or the additional time spent by logistics Workers due to equipment failure Example : 1) Time spent by OE to transport outer tube from machining cell to VSW.

Slide 108: 

5.MEASUREMENT AND ADJUSTMENT LOSS Measurements and adjustment loss is the loss caused by frequent measurements and adjustments to prevent the recurrence or discharge of defective materials Example : Checking of pull off strength in UTM and adjusting the current, pressure, fixture etc., Inspection of outer tube or Inner tube and adjusting the machine for avoiding producing defective components.

Slide 109: 

3 MAJOR MATERIAL,DIE JIG,TOOL AND ENERGY LOSSES There are 3 major losses which prevent efficient use of material,die,jig,tool and energy “ and are as shown below Energy loss Yield loss Die,tool and jig loss

Slide 110: 

ENERGY LOSS Energy loss is the input energy (electricity,gas,fuel,etc.) which cannot be effectively used for processing .Losses Such as the start-up loss,temperature loss during processing And idling loss are included in this category. Example: Idle running of conveyor with out damper. Running of pumps, boiler etc, in lunch / tea break with out painting. 3) Idle running of all machines during lunch / tea break

Slide 111: 

2. DIE,TOOL AND JIG LOSS Die, tool and jig loss is the extra expenses needed for replacing the dies,tools and jigs which are worn over long service or broken,or the expenses spent for regrinding or Re-nitriding . Support materials like cutting oil,grinding Oil,etc are included in this type of loss. Example: 1)

Slide 112: 

3. YIELD LOSS Yield loss is the difference in the raw material weight and the weight of the good-quality products produced.such losses as defective materials,cutting loss and losses in weight are included in this category

Slide 113: 

What is Overall Equipment Efficiency To Calculate the Equipment Operating state and judge if the Equipment is utilised to its fullest, by Quantitatively calculating the various equipment losses. Overall Equipment = Availability X Performance X Quality Efficiency (O.E.E) product rate = 0.87 X 0.5 X 0.98 X 100 = 42.6 %

Slide 114: 

RELATION SHIP BETWEEN 7 MAJOR LOSSES OF OVERALL EQUIPMENT EFFICIENCY AND AVAILABILITY Equipment 7 major losses Calculation of overall equipment losses Loading time Operating time Net operating time Valuable operating time Loading time-down time Availability = Loading time *100 (1) Equipment failure (2) Set-up & adjustment (3) Cutting blade change (4) Start-up (example) 460 mins – 60 mins Availability = * 100 460 mins = 87%

Slide 115: 

RELATION BETWEEN 7 MAJOR LOSSES OF OVERALL EQUIPMENT EFFICIENCY AND PERFORMANCE RATE Equipment Loading time Operating time Net operating time Value operating time 7 major losses (5) Minor stoppage & idling (6) Speed Calculation of overall equipment efficiency Performance rate = Standard cycle time X Products units processed Operating time * 100 (Example) Performance rate = 0.5 mins/ units X 400 units 400 mins X 100 = 50 %

Slide 116: 

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN 7 MAJOR LOSSES OF OVERALL EQUIPMENT EFFICIENCY AND QUALITY PRODUCT RATE Equipment 7 major losses Calculation of overall equipment losses Loading time Operating time Net operating time Valuable operating time product units – defect units Quality product processed = *100 rate product unit processed (7) Defects & rework (example) 460 units – 8 units Quality product = * 100 rate 460 units = 98%

Slide 117: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE KOBETSU KAIZEN (FOCUSED IMPROVEMENT) QUALITY MAINTENANCE

Slide 118: 

Pillar : Hinshitsu Hozen Aim : Realise ‘Zero’ defects through observing the required equipment maintenance Method: Conformation to the standards for quality characteristics and recognise the defect symptom and actual defect record Assure product quality, investigate the unit process material and energy utilisation eqpt condition and production methods Investigation, analysis and kaizens for fuguai conditions Set forth 3 M conditions and inspection reference values Standardisation of the rules to be observed and trend control Who : Staff and cell leaders

Slide 122: 

Types of defects OK NG Action Counter measure through ‘Education & training’ analysis Type ‘A’ Type ‘B’ Type ‘C’

Slide 123: 

Type ‘A’ ‘A’ TYPE DEFECTS 1. ‘A’ type defects are caused by sporadic causes. 2. This occurs suddenly and will continue till taking corrective actions. 3. Can be solved by analysing through Why-Why analysis. 4. By taking corrective action the defect can be corrected. Examples : 1. Outer tube facing and chamfering chamfering not - ok. 2. Ring mark in front fork outer tube.

Slide 124: 

‘B’ TYPE DEFECTS 1. ‘B’ type defects are caused by chronic causes. 2. This occurs gradually and will continue and disappear by itself without taking corrective action. 3. Can be solved by analysing through PM analysis. 4. Periodical checking / inspection to sustain zero. Examples : 1. Damping value variation in shox dampers. Type ‘B’

Slide 125: 

‘C’ TYPE DEFECTS 1. ‘C’ type defects occur during setting. 2. This occurs in first product when the setting is done 3. By taking corrective action this defect can be corrected. 4. By providing master set pieces and set up aid this defect can be prevented. Examples : 1. Grinding mark on inner tube. 2. Spring seat pressing length variation. OK NG Action Counter measure through ‘Education & training’ analysis Type ‘C’

Slide 126: 

POKA - YOKE Poka – Yoke is a technique for avoiding simple Human errors at work. Which means MISTAKE PROOFING

Slide 127: 

MISSING Missing of operation Missing of Component Missing of Inspection REVERSE Reversing of component Reversing of operation Reversing of Inspection WRONG POSITION Wrong position of Component Wrong position of Operation Wrong Position of Inspection

Slide 128: 

MISSING Limb with out oil Outer tube with out milling Outer tube with out threading FF Inner tube with out drilling BTA bore operation Outer tube with out Axle hole Shox damper with out mig welding Shox damper with out lug welding Shox damper with out spinning Shox damper with out case cap spinning Shox with out nut torquing Shox damper with out dynamic testing Sxox damper with out oil Internal assembly components

Slide 129: 

Reversing of seal in piston rod assembly Reversing of FF Inner tube In CNC 2 Reversing of drilling operation on Inner Tube REVERSE

Slide 130: 

Wrong loading of outer tube on VMC Wrong loading of parts in piston rod Assembly Wrong loading of Piston rods on grinder. Wrong loading of lug on fixture Wrong loading of outer tube in eyering welding Wrong loading of outer tube on mig welding Wrong loading of FF IT on cleaning m/c Wrong component assembly Wrong loading of thimble and circlip in base valve Assembly. WRONG POSITION

Slide 131: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE KOBETSU KAIZEN (FOCUSED IMPROVEMENT) QUALITY MAINTENANCE EDUCATION & TRAINING

Slide 132: 

Pillar : Education and training Aim : Raise the technical skill level of operators and maintenance men Method: Basic maintenance steps- nuts & bolts - key mating - Bearings- Gear Transmission- Leakage prevention - Hyd & Pneumatic eqpt -Electrical control systems Who : Operators and maintenance men

Slide 133: 

Six step implementation for operation and maintenance skill development Step 1 : Setting of principles and priority measures based on conformation of the present status of training Step 2 : Establishment of a training system for operation and maintenance skill development. Step 3 : Execution of operation and maintenance skill management Step 4 : Establishment and evolution of a system for developing and nurturing capabilities Step 5 : Creation of the self enlightening environment Step 6 : Activity evaluation and study of future activity method

Slide 134: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE KOBETSU KAIZEN (FOCUSED IMPROVEMENT) QUALITY MAINTENANCE EDUCATION & TRAINING INITIAL FLOW CONTROL

Slide 135: 

Pillar : Initial flow control Aim : Shorten the trial period for new product, design of new equipment, and run-up time for stable launching of products Method: Set fort development and design targets Easy to manufacture, maintain and reliable equipment Study of LCC Review of design methodologies Who : R & D / Production Engg Staff

Slide 136: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE KOBETSU KAIZEN (FOCUSED IMPROVEMENT) QUALITY MAINTENANCE EDUCATION & TRAINING INITIAL FLOW CONTROL SAFETY SANITATION & ENVIRONMENT

Slide 137: 

Pillar : Safety, Health and Environment Aim : Attain and keep the Zero accident level Create a healthy and clean working area Method: Safety measures to protect the operators from equipment accidents Make the operation safe Improve the working environment - noise, dust Measures to achieve environment protection. Attention to the health and hygiene of the employees Promotion of cheerful working environment. Who : Managers & staff

Slide 138: 

OVERVIEW OF EIGHT PILLARS AUTONOMOUS MAINTENANCE PLANNED MAINTENANCE KOBETSU KAIZEN (FOCUSED IMPROVEMENT) QUALITY MAINTENANCE EDUCATION & TRAINING INITIAL FLOW CONTROL SAFETY SANITATION & ENVIRONMENT OFFICE TPM

Slide 139: 

Pillar : Office TPM Aim : Realise Zero functional loss Organise high efficiency loss Render service and support function to the service departments Method: By 5 pillar activities Who : Members of sales and administrative departments

Slide 140: 

Key Points For Success In Implementation Cooperation Between All Departments Maintenance understanding and support Led by work Teams Operator Input and Decision on Check Sheet Items TPM Activities Become Part Of The Daily Routine

3 : 

ANY QUESTIONS ? THANK YOU 3

authorStream Live Help