Identity Theft

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Identity Theft:Padlock Your Personal Data Presented By: Katherine Kline, ChFC   Principal, RetireSD                 1902 Wright Place #200 Carlsbad, CA  92008                800-223-2765 kathe@retiresd.com CA License #0797566       Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through ING Financial Partners, Inc. Member SIPC. RetireSD is not a subsidiary of nor controlled by ING Financial Partners. Workshop Date: 03/03/2010 Seminar Provided by ING Financial Partners (member SIPC) C08.0219.008 (02/08)

Slide 2: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation How vulnerable are you? I toss those credit-card offers right in the trash. My U.S. mailbox is wide open My Social Security card? It’s in my wallet right now. Who needs acredit report? It’s so much easier to get checks approved with my SSN + phone preprinted on them.

Why Voluntary Benefits : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation We’re all at risk. Why Voluntary Benefits $221 billion  Businesses across the world lose (Aberdeen Group http://www.aberdeen.com $1,830  lost per household averaged (US Bureau of Justice Statistics December 2010, NCJ 231680).

Slide 4: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation We’re all at risk. Source: February 2010, Javelin Study Finds Identity Fraud Reached New High in 2009, but Consumers are Fighting Back. Data was found at www.javelinstrategy.com on 02.17.2011.

Slide 5: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Are you part of the annual number of victims? In Millions Source: February 2010, Javelin Study Finds Identity Fraud Reached New High in 2009, but Consumers are Fighting Back. Data was found at www.javelinstrategy.com on 02.17.2011 Note: Based on US population estimates (age 18 and over), http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.php accessed January 01.11.2010

Why Voluntary Benefits : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation We’re all at risk. Why Voluntary Benefits 4.8% U.S Population was a victim of ID theft 2010 Identity Fraud Survey Report conducted by Javelin Strategy and Research for the Better Business Bureau,available at http://www.idsafety.net/report.php 13% Of the identity fraud crimes were committed by someone the victim knew

Main Menu : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Main Menu More than your wallet or your PIN, identity thieves steal your good name.

How identities are stolen (1/3) : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Music sharing sites and other peer-to-peer networks have helped high-tech thieves get all kinds of personal information via accidental disclosure. Ask for our Create the Vision CD-ROM How identities are stolen (1/3) Thieves search your trash for documents that contain your personal information and gain access to important numbers that help them commit identity theft. When a thief steals your wallet, they gain instant access to the information they need to take the next step and steal your identity. Change of Address: This is a classic identity theft technique—thieves change the address where you receive mail and divert your personal information into the wrong hands. The prevalence of cameras and recorders in today’s mobile phones make this form of identity theft a real threat. Today's thieves are innovating the way they steal your personal information, by swiping it–literally–when you are in the midst of a legitimate transaction such as paying for dinner bill at a restaurant, pumping gas, or using an ATM. Source: (1) February 2010, Javelin Strategy & Research Newsletter. (2) Identities Are Stolen, www.lifelock.com. As of 02.17.2011

How identities are stolen (2/3) : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Hidden devices can be installed almost imperceptibly on any ATM, enabling thieves to swipe your account information when you insert your card. How identities are stolen (2/3) Complaints by victims' age points to an interesting statistic: incidents of fraud are low in consumers age 19 and younger. These days, that email from your bank in your inbox could be real—or a phishing attempt. Sending text messages to your mobile device that impersonate a reputable contact and then direct you to a dangerous website with the goal of stealing your identity. Voice calls made to your landline or mobile phone—is an effective way for thieves to get your personal information. Thieves are experts at duplicating legitimate online storefronts. Before you know it, you've completed your transaction and inadvertently handed over the personal information they need to commit fraud. Source: (1) February 2010, Javelin Strategy & Research Newsletter. (2) Identities Are Stolen, www.lifelock.com. As of 02.17.2011

How identities are stolen (3/3) : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation According to Javelin Research, by the time financial institutions detect that a data breach has occurred, a fraud attempt has already been made in seven out of ten cases*—without you even knowing that your personal information has been compromised. How identities are stolen (3/3) These days, that email from your bank in your inbox could be real—or a phishing attempt. Cyber thieves can install malicious software to exploit weaknesses in features of many popular software titles. Once installed, malware can run executable programs on your computer without your consent, including transmitting personal information via the Internet to remote computers, where it is stored and sold at a later date to counterfeiters. Keystroke logging is one of the most advanced forms of malware criminals can use to register your passwords, login IDs, and account information—without you even knowing Source: (1) February 2010, Javelin Strategy & Research Newsletter. (2) Identities Are Stolen, www.lifelock.com. As of 02.17.2011

Slide 11: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Steal money from checking/savings. Charge to existing accounts. Open new accounts in your name. Establish new identities. What do thieves do with my info?

How do identity thieves misuse stoleninformation? : 

How do identity thieves misuse stoleninformation? © 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation 2010 Identity Fraud Survey Report conducted by Javelin Strategy and Research for the Better Business Bureau,available at http://www.idsafety.net/report.php

Slide 13: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation What are the critical combinations that can add up to trouble? PIN/credit #/checking # DOB/mother’s maiden name address/employer SSN + + +

Slide 14: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Why care about identity theft? $50 “That’s the most I’m liable for, right?”

Slide 15: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation $750 Median fraud amount per fraud victim Financial peril is the least of your problems. 2010 Identity Fraud Survey Report conducted by Javelin Strategy and Research for the Better Business Bureau,available at http://www.idsafety.net/report.php

Slide 16: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation $1,870 Average out-of-pocket per victim trying to resolve Financial peril is the least of your problems. (US Bureau of Justice Statistics December 2010, NCJ 231680).

Slide 17: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Length of time spent clearing up problems associated with identity theft 1 day or less 2-7 days 1 month to less than 3 months Long-term problems: no new credit no new job higher insurance rates higher credit card rates 42% 17% 12% 6 months or more 3% (US Bureau of Justice Statistics December 2010, NCJ 231680).

Slide 18: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Where’s your greatest risk? Source: February 2011 Identity Fraud Survey Report: Consumer Version—Prevention – Detection – Resolution https://www.javelinstrategy.com/uploads/1103.R_2011%20Identity%20Fraud%20Survey%20Consumer%20Report.pdf on 2.17.2011

Slide 19: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Contrary to widely held belief, only 11% of ID theft happens online. 2009Identity Fraud Survey Report, conducted by Javelin Strategy and Research for the Better Business Bureau, http://www.iwalletusa.com/Security.aspx

Common fraud scams and terms : 

Common fraud scams and terms © 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Account takeover fraud Advanced fee fraud Cloning ‐ mobile phone Cloning ‐ payment card Card‐not‐present (CNP) Consumer cost Credit freeze Data breach Drive by download Existing accounts fraud Existing card accounts fraud Existing non‐card accounts fraud Fraud amount Identity fraud Identity theft Interactive financial messaging Keylogger Mail order/telephone order (MOTO) Account takeover fraud Malware Man‐in‐the‐middle (MITM) Mutual authentication New Accounts and Other frauds Non‐identity fraud Pharming Pretexting Scanning Skimming Smishing Spam Spoofing Spyware Virus True name fraud

Slide 21: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation What are common low-tech scams? Low-tech

Slide 22: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation How do the high-techers do it? High-tech

Slide 23: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Can you spot the signs of email scamming? bogus URL @ in link spelling mistakes unlikely offer

Why ING : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Take action to protect yourself. Why ING

Slide 25: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation How to Protect Your self

Slide 26: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation In lots of cases, it’s no mystery how identity theft happened. 50% of victims knew how 30% of victims knew who (US Bureau of Justice Statistics December 2010, NCJ 231680).

Slide 27: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation To tighten up security, simply change a few habits. Carry your SS card Write PINs on your cards Keep financial docs in your glove box Choose obvious passwords DO DON’T Lock up personal financial data Secure your passport Shred credit offers and financial documents Take outgoing mail to a U.S. postbox

Slide 28: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Take precautions when in public or online. Announce your SSN / data in public Store personal / financial data on your laptop Click a link or respond to an unsolicited email DO DON’T Install anti-virus, anti-spyware software Call your financial institution if you doubt an email’s authenticity Take credit card receipts with you

Slide 29: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Always be on your guard. Review your statements every month! Get a free credit report 2x annually! Monitor checking account activity.Question why someone needs your Social Security number. 1. 2. 3.4.

Why Voluntary Benefits : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation We’re all at risk. Why Voluntary Benefits 16,167,542  of Records lose across the world 662 of Breaches lost The Identity Theft Resource Center, 2010 , www.idtheftcenter.org

Slide 31: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Take steps to protect your company’s data. Review mobile devices for confidential data. Remove data you don’t immediately need. Guard your laptop. Choose a hard-to-guess password. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Slide 32: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation What Should I Do if I Become a Victim of Identity Fraud? Immediately Contact Your bank and credit card companies The Federal Trade Commission Place a fraud alert on your credit report Consider placing a security freeze on your credit report File a police report

What’s next? : 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Time to take action: Ask for our Create the Vision CD-ROM What’s next?

Slide 34: 

© 2008 ING North America Insurance Corporation Thanks for participating inIdentity Theft:Padlock Your Personal Data Seminar Provided by ING Financial Partners (member SIPC) C08.0219.008 (02/08)

authorStream Live Help