Accessibility

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Accessibility & Customer Service:

Accessibility & Customer Service

Slide 2:

Stats about disability

Objectives:

Objectives Identify equity and accessibility initiatives at UofT and the FPEH Compare and contrast the social and medical models of disability Address the use of appropriate and inappropriate language Identify ways to support members through inclusive service Identify biases and values as well as interventions for accessibility based scenarios Provide further resources of information

Barriers to Accessibility:

Barriers to Accessibility

Barriers to Accessibility:

Barriers to Accessibility It is important to understand both the Social and Medical Models. We are enabled and disabled in society and we have the power to enable/disable others. Barriers can be visible and non-visible

Slide 7:

Attitude is about what we think and how we interact with persons with impairments.

Slide 8:

Architectural or structural barriers may result from design elements of a building or through everyday practices.

DVD – 12:38-12:59 Explanation of structural barriers:

DVD – 12:38-12:59 Explanation of structural barriers

Slide 10:

Information or communication barriers can make it difficult to receive or convey information. Safety Rules and Facility Guidelines Stay visble at all times Wear shoes in the facility Return your weights Walk don’t run on the pool deck Look both ways before crossing the track Stay hydrated Here is another rule for you\ Can you read this? If you can then your eyesight must be really good! Maybe I should have my eyes checked

Slide 11:

Technology , or the lack of it, can prevent people from accessing information.

Slide 12:

Systemic barriers can result from an organization’s policies, practices and procedures.

Stages of Inclusion:

Stages of Inclusion

Stages of Inclusion:

Stages of Inclusion Segregation Mainstreaming Inclusion

Segregation:

Segregation Disabled persons were given their own environment This only served to isolate disabled people

Mainstreaming:

Mainstreaming persons with impairments play, live, and work amongst peers who are not disabled. This did not address the attitudes of people or institutions about disabilities.

Inclusion:

Inclusion Inclusion providing opportunities for individuals of all abilities and interests to participate Taking into consideration differing levels of ability Examples Putting a bell in a ball so that participants with visual impairments may participate Provide verbal, tactile, and visual instructions Install lifts in aquatic environments for pool access

Inclusion means working towards embracing an attitude of respect and embracing individual differences. :

Inclusion means working towards embracing an attitude of respect and embracing individual differences .

Troubling Language:

Troubling Language

The Power of Language:

The Power of Language • Person first terminology • Taken-for-granted language • Disability as a metaphor for a problem • Disability assumed as a fixed category We play a critical role in constructing our understanding and meaning of disability

The Power of Language:

The Power of Language • “Person with disability” vs. “Disabled persons” • “Person first” language • Disability as Identity

What are you, Deaf!? :

What are you, Deaf!? That is sick! Don’t be such a spaz Lame! That’s just retarded!

Troubling Language:

Troubling Language • Disability is often used as a metaphor for a problem This leads to an understanding of disability as something negative.

Troubling Language:

Troubling Language Disability is often presented as a fixed category which has no level or threshold There is a spectrum of disability which may change for a given individual. We need to emphasize the “everydayness” of disability.

Theory to Practice:

Theory to Practice Self awareness Be an ally Question your assumptions Practice inclusion

Disclosing Disability:

Disclosing Disability

DVD – 13:05-13:15 Gerome talking about ideal environment:

DVD – 13:05-13:15 Gerome talking about ideal environment

Disclosing Disability:

Disclosing Disability People with impairments choose whether or not to disclose their disability. How a disclosure is received can affect how a person will approach a new situation or relationship. Disclosures should always be received with respect and sensitivity.

Case Study:

Case Study You are at work (the pool, or the Strength and Conditioning Centre) and a member with a visual impairment comes in with her working dog to use the facility. There is no place for the dog to rest while the owner does her workout, but the dog needs a secure place to wait. What concerns may arise? How could you handle this? Do you: Yell out that she cannot bring her dog into the facility and that she must leave immediately. Allow the dog to go for a swim/workout with her Refer back to the following customer service tips from this workshop:

Slide 31:

Speak directly to the member

DVD 9:00-9:33 – Clip that explains the role of the dog as a service animal:

DVD 9:00-9:33 – Clip that explains the role of the dog as a service animal

Slide 33:

Speak normally and clearly. When offering assistance, wait for permission.

DVD 3:58-4:18 “People think because I am blind I am also deaf”:

DVD 3:58-4:18 “People think because I am blind I am also deaf”

Slide 35:

When acting as a guide, speak clearly and describe items in the environment.

DVD 10:51-11:20 significance of cues in the environment. :

DVD 10:51-11:20 significance of cues in the environment.

Slide 37:

Take each interaction as a learning experience. Here are some suggestions for you:

DVD 14:40-15:10 Suggestions for staff. :

DVD 14:40-15:10 Suggestions for staff.

Slide 39:

If you are unsure how to assist someone with a disability…ask! The best way to begin an encounter is by simply asking, “How may I help you?”

Wrap Up:

Wrap Up Customer Service Tips Speak directly to the member Speak normally and clearly. When offering assistance, wait for permission. When acting as a guide, speak clearly and describe items in the environment. Take each interaction as a learning experience. If you are unsure how to assist someone with a disability…ask! The best way to begin an encounter is by simply asking, “How may I help you?”

physical.utoronto.ca:

physical.utoronto.ca

Thank You!:

Thank You!

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