Critical Infrastructure Security Investment in Europe 2011 Brochure

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Brochure : 

Brochure Critical National InfrastructureSecurity Investment in Europe February 2011 How Converged Risk Methodologies are Key to Justifying Security Investment What the EU can do to boost Investment & Security NATO’s role in supporting Critical Infrastructure Security Up-to-date analysis of investment patterns & projections from 2011-2016 Incorporating current perspective of threat & risk to CNI Covering physical security & cyber security in five key CNI sectors Technology forecast breakdowns for Access Control, Surveillance, Perimeter Protection, and Cyber Security technology Conclusions & priorities for both public & private sector stakeholders Presented over 100 pages with more than 80 tables and charts User-friendly Tear-Sheets with consolidated tables for each section Dataset available in accompanying spreadsheet

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2 About this Report This report has chosen to focus on 5 specific sectors which vary considerably in security risk characteristics & their structure, but also share some similarities in terms of their criticality to society & their vulnerabilities. As such they are of primary interest to governments & regulators. Changing public sector requirements, shifts in risk methodologies, competing priorities for investment in infrastructure, and the emergence of new threats, all within the context of a difficult economic environment are among the major factors that will have a significant impact upon investment in security solutions, and therefore the resilience of our society. The primary objectives of this report has been to collate the relevant data and provide robust intelligence-led and judgement-based forecasts, and therefore to identify whether there is sufficient planned investment within the context of current risk. Critical National Infrastructure Security Investment in Europe is one of a series of investment forecast analyses for security technology & solutions across the European Union by the Solomon Barnes Consulting Group [SBCG]. The report sets out to demonstrate that there is insufficient investment in security technology, and significant barriers to change unless it is driven by government, through a coherent set of measures. The analysis aims to summarise the key sector trends and developments that are affecting investment across Europe; to consider the implications for future investment in key critical infrastructure sectors, and thereafter for the main technology segments, which are subsequently broken down by sub-segment, and presented in consolidated data ‘tear-sheets’ in each section. The report consolidates investment patterns in all the European member states to provide a regional view, which is then divided into two sub-regions: Western Europe referring to the ‘old’ EU; and the New Member States. The report has overcome the varying reliability and availability of data by providing estimates based upon knowledge of the security market, and modelling the impact of market factors and patterns of investment based on trusted primary & secondary sources. To policy makers, the report therefore provides a broad & composite view of the underlying trends, imbalances, and deficiencies in investment. Is there sufficient planned investment Is the investment appropriate to the risk What are the endemic constraints & distortions Why are operators failing to make the right decisions What should governments & regulators be doing What needs to change in European Security thinking

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3 Report Structure The Introduction provides a concise but critical view of the current complex situation in 2010, discussing the converged threat landscape, and pointing to ICT dependence & risk governance as two leading issues that need to be addressed, while describing the future impact of numerous factors that are encouraging and constraining investment, and combine to create the complex environment for the EU, and its governments. Section I presents an overview of investment, in both physical and cyber security, before proceeding to examine physical security in section II and cyber security in section III. Section IV provides forecasts of each specific technology segment, with detailed breakdown of sub-segment data, and by sector. In this dynamic technology market, the comprehensive data illustrates how issues such as physical/logical convergence, and the networking of solutions will bring more generic factors to play across the segments of surveillance, access control, cyber security, and perimeter protection. Data by infrastructure sector then shows that most have sector- specific dynamics, which differ in their rate of uptake or impact across Europe. While the report is not exhaustive as an examination of technology development prospects, the trends and forecasts identify & quantify the emerging opportunities for vendors and integrators alike. The Conclusion section presents a number of priorities and suggestions for addressing the challenges that Europe faces. First it outlines a series of conclusions, and priorities for change across Europe, tackling policy, strategy alignment, coordination, governance, and resilience. Some of the key points that emerge from this are the need for more joint situational awareness and the sharing of intelligence among agencies, the need for more regulation and a centralised approach to cross-sector and cross-border security planning, a more distinct European strategy on energy security, and more national oversight of SMARs, and standards to enable better integrated command & control. Second it examines Europe and its role & relationships with NATO which complicated by the remit and aspiration of European states for the EDA. The commentary examines the argument for NATO’s role and the implications for the EDA in European infrastructure protection, and the advantages NATO brings an appropriate existing vehicle for implementing urgent and effective change. Then it addresses the issue of risk assessment. Effective risk assessments are critical to driving appropriate investment & countermeasures, and encouraging collaboration across borders. The rise of converged risks that combine physical and cyber domains, has exposed flaws in existing risk assessment processes, which need to be adapted and redefined in order to be effective. This section also examines organisational barriers to more effective risk management with strategically integrated cyber security officers. The section then concludes by describing a converged security management ‘concept’ that combines physical and logical elements and advocates the use of scenario-building as a valuable process for considering converged risk.

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Definitions & Segmentation 4 Market Segmentation by Technology – Cyber Security Hardware & Software Security Appliances Firewalls, Anti virus scanning devices, Content filtering devices, Intrusion detection appliances, Penetration testing appliances Vulnerability assessment appliances, Unified Threat Management, VPNs Security Software Secure Content and Threat Management, Security and Vulnerability Management, End Point Security Software: anti-virus, anti-spyware, firewall, anti-spam, application and port control Market Segmentation by Industry Oil & Gas Production, processing, transport (pipelines), storage Electricity Generation, transmission, distribution ICT Data centres, ISPs, telecom providers, cloud services providers Financial Financial & banking institutions Water & wastewater Storage, treatment, distribution Market Segmentation by Region Western Europe Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK New EU Member States Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia Market Segmentation by Technology – Physical Security Hardware & Software Fencing & Intrusion Detection Fencing Intrusion Detection Fence Mounted Sensors, Free-Standing Sensors, Other Sensors (PIR, electromagnetic, photo-electric, glass shock) Panels Access Control Biometrics Systems Fingerprint, Hand Geometry, Iris, Retinal Pattern, Facial, Voice EACS Key Pads, Proximity Cards & Readers, Contactless Cards & Readers, Other EACS Video Surveillance Cameras Analog cameras, IP cameras Storage DVR, NVR, other storage Others Video Servers, Monitors, Software

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5 Table of Contents Introduction page 2 Table of Contents page 3 List of Figures Page 4 List of Tables Page 5 About this report Page 6 Definitions Page 7 Perspective on the Threat Page 8 Where are we in 2010 Page 10 Perspective on Risk Governance Page 12 Security Risk Orbits Page 13 Part I - Overview page 14 Impact Mapping of Key Factors page 15 Impact of Regulation & Compliance page 16 Infrastructure Development page 17 Factors Constraining Investment page 18 Total European Investment page 19 Investment by Type of Security Western Europe: Tear Sheet page 21 Investment by Type of Security Eastern Europe: Tear Sheet page 22 Part II - Physical Security page 23 Investment by Technology page 24 Investment by Industry page 25 Investment by Industry: Europe Tear Sheet page 26 Investment by Region page 27 Western European States page 28 New Member States page 30 Part III - Cyber Security page 32 Overview & Scope of Threat page 33 Cyber Risk Orbits page 36 Challenges page 37 Total European Investment page 39 Cyber Technology: Tear Sheets page 41 Investment by Region page 43 Investment by Region: Tear Sheets page 44 Investment by Industry page 45 Investment by Industry: Tear Sheets page 47 Western European States page 49 New Member States page 51 Part IV - Technology Analysis page 53 Major Trends and their Market Impact page 54 Investment Overview page 56 Technology Trends and their Impact on Market Structure page 59 Access Control Page 61 Access Control: Tear Sheets page 64 Video Surveillance page 67 Video Surveillance: Tear Sheets page 70 Perimeter Protection page 76 Perimeter Protection: Tear Sheets page 79 Part V - Conclusions & Priorities page 82 Conclusions page 83 Priorities page 86 How NATO can help page 89 Why European Security Strategy needs NATO page 91 Adapting & Redefining Risk page 94 Adapting to a Converged Risk Environment page 96 Using Scenarios for Converged Risk page 97 Working with Scenarios page 98 Appendices page 99

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6 List of Figures Fig 1: Correlation of ICT Dependence and Vulnerability for Top CNI Sectors 2011/2012 page 9 Fig 2: Trend in Risk Governance by Selected Utility Sector, 2010/2014 page 12 Fig 3: Security Risk Orbit Model page 13 Fig 4: Impact Mapping Of Key Factors on Security Solution Investment, 2011/12 page 15 Fig 5: Impact of Regulation - Trend page 16 Fig 6: Impact of Infrastructure Development - Trend page 17 Fig 7: Impact of Operators Reluctance - Trend page 18 Fig 8: Impact of Technology Deficiencies - Trend page 18 Fig 9: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Europe by Type, 2008-2016, page 19 Fig 10: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Growth Rates, Western Europe by Type, 2009-2016 page 21 Fig 11: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Growth Rates, New Member States by Type, 2009-2016 page 22 Fig 12: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Physical Security by Industry, Europe, 2008-2016 page 25 Fig 13: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Physical Security, Europe by Region, 2008-2016 page 27 Fig 14: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Western Europe, Physical Security by Country, 2009 & 2013 page 28 Fig 15: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, New Member States, Physical Security by Country, 2009 & 2013 page 30 Fig 16: Risk Awareness & Scale of Attacks, Europe by Industry, 2010 page 34 Fig 17: Scale of attacks & Preparedness, Europe by Industry, 2010 page 34 Fig 18: Critical Infrastructure Security: Factor Benchmarking by Industry 2010, Europe page 35 Fig 19: Security Risk Orbit Model; Cyber Threats page 36 Fig 20: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment, Europe by Type, € million 2008-2016 page 39 Fig 21: Cyber Security Investment: Hardware vs Software, Europe, by Region € million, 2008-2016 page 40 Fig 22: Cyber Security Investment by Type, Growth Rates, Europe, 2008-2016 page 41 Fig 23: Cyber Security Investment Europe by Region, 2008-2016 page 43 Fig 24: Cyber Security Investment, Growth Rates, Europe by Region, 2009-2016 page 44 Fig 25: Cyber Security Investment by Industry, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 45 Fig 26: Cyber Security Investment, Growth Rates, Western Europe by Industry, 2008-2016 page 47 Fig 27: Cyber Security Investment by Industry, New Member States, 2008-2016, € million page 48 Fig 28: Cyber Security Investment, Western Europe, Investment by Country, 2009 & 2013 page 49 Fig 29: Cyber Security Investment, New Member States, Investment by Country, 2009 & 2013 page 51 Fig 30: Impact of Specific Trends on Overall Market Growth 2002-2016 page 54 Fig 31: Physical Security Investment by Type, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 56 Fig 32: Physical Security Investment by Technology, Europe, Rate of Growth, 2008-2016 page 57 Fig 33: Trends and Their Impact on Market Structure 2011 page 59 Fig 34: Impact Of Key Factors On Technology Development Priorities page 60 Fig 35: Access Control Investment by Industry, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 61 Fig 36: Access Control Investment by Type, Europe, € millions, 2008-2016 page 63 Fig 37: Access Control Investment by Type, Western Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 65 Fig 38: Access Control Investment by Type, New Member States, Growth Rate, 2008-2016 page 66 Fig 39: Video Surveillance Investment, by Industry, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 67 Fig 40: Video Surveillance Investment by Type, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 69 Fig 41: Video Surveillance Investment by Type, Europe, Growth Rates, 2008-2016 page 71 Fig 42: Video Surveillance Investment: Growth Rates by Type, Western Europe, 2008-2016 page 73 Fig 43: Video Surveillance Investment: Growth Rates by Type, New Member States, 2008-2016 page 75 Fig 44: Perimeter Protection Investment by Industry, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 76 Fig 45: Perimeter Protection Investment by Type, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 78 Fig 46: Security Model for Converged Risk page 96

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7 List of Tables Table 1: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Europe by Type, 2008-2016, € million page 20 Table 2: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Western Europe by Type, € million, 2008-2016 page 21 Table 3: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, New Member States by Type, € million, 2008-2016 page 22 Table 4: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Physical Security Spending, Europe by Technology, 2008-2016, € million page 24 Table 5: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Physical Security Spending, Europe by Industry, 2008-2016, € million page 26 Table 6: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Physical Security Spending by Country, Western Europe, 2009-2013, € million page 29 Table 7: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Cyber Security Spending by Country, New Member States, 2009-2013, € million page 31 Table 8: Critical Infrastructure Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Europe by Type, € million, 2008-2016 page 40 Table 9: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Total Europe by Type, 2008-2016, € million page 41 Table 10: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Western Europe by Type, € million, 2008-2016 page 42 Table 11: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, New Member States by Type, € million, 2008-2016 page 42 Table 12: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Europe by Region, € million, 2008-2016 page 44 Table 13: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Europe by Industry, € million, 2008-2016 page 46 Table 14: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Western Europe by Industry, € million, 2008-2016 page 47 Table 15: Cyber Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, New Member States by Industry, 2008-2016, € million page 48 Table 16: Cyber Security Investment: Spending by Country, Western Europe, € million, 2009-2013 page 50 Table 17: Cyber Security Investment: Spending by Country, New Member States, € million, 2009-2013 page 52 Table 18: Physical Security Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, Europe by Technology, € million, 2008-2016 page 57 Table 19: Physical Security Investment : Spending and Growth Rates Western Europe by Technology, € million, 2008-2016 page 58 Table 20: Physical Security Investment :New Member States by Technology, € million, 2008-2016 page 58 Table 21: Access Control Investment :Spending & Growth Rates by Industry, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 62 Table 22: Access Control Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Type, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 64 Table 23: Access Control Investment by Type, Western Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 65 Table 24: Access Control Investment by Type, New Member States, € million, 2008-2016 page 66 Table 25: Video Surveillance Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Industry Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 68 Table 26: Video Surveillance Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Type, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 70 Table 27: Video Surveillance Investment: % Share by Type, Europe, 2008-2016 page 71 Table 28: Video Surveillance Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Type, Western Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 72 Table 29: Video Surveillance Investment: % Share by Type, Western Europe, 2008-2016 page 73 Table 30: Video Surveillance Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Type, New Member States, € million, 2008-2016 page 74 Table 31: Video Surveillance Investment: % Share by Type, New Member States, 2008-2016 page 75 Table 32: Perimeter Protection Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Industry, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 77 Table 33: Perimeter Protection Investment: Spending and Growth Rates by Type, Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 79 Table 34: Perimeter Protection Investment: Spending and Growth Rates by Type, Western Europe, € million, 2008-2016 page 80 Table 35: Perimeter Protection Investment: Spending and Growth Rates, by Type, New Member States,€ million, 2008-2016 page 81

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8 Order Form & Payment Details I wish to purchase: Critical National Infrastructure: Security Investment in Europe Tick boxes to indicate the report format (S) you wish to receive PDF Copy……………………….………$3150/£1980 Printed copy.............................$315/£198 per extra copy. State number of copies .......... Data Spreadsheet.....................$315/£198 Please enter your contact details Name __________________________________________ Title ____________________________________________ Company________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone ______________________________________ Fax _____________________________________________ E-mail address ____________________________________ P.O. Number _____________________________________ Signature ________________________________________ Date ____________________________________________ All EU orders are billed in GBP Sterling. Orders from all other countries are billed in US$. An invoice will be despatched upon receipt of this form. Payment should be made through bank transfer. Payment is due upon receipt of invoice For more information about payment, please contact us at:info@solomon-consulting.co.uk Please scan and return this form by email to info@solomon-consulting.co.uk

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9 www.solomon-consulting.com About The Solomon Barnes Consulting Group The Solomon Barnes Consulting Group is a European-based analysis & consultancy group. The group’s capabilities are built on a trusted European network of associates: all defence & security analysts, with subject matter expertise across a wide variety of different markets & disciplines for major companies and organisations requiring analysis & consulting on the defence and security domains. Our staff have held positions within, leading consulting & strategy firms, and leading vendors, and with public sector, military, & security service organisations. Our expertise in applying intelligence to generate up-to-date assessments of risk and opportunities across technology, solutions, and threat domains builds on our access to unique sources, and relevant experience in defence & security operations, and planning. Readers of this report may be interested in the follow services for Critical Infrastructure Security Risk & Resilience Consulting Workshops & Scenario-Building ‘Red Team’ Exercises Analysis & Markets Strategy Consulting Added Value Analytics For more information about contact: info@solomon-consulting.com or download an e-brochure from www.solomon-consulting.com Airport Security Border Security Cyber Security Seaport & Maritime Security Critical Infrastructure Security Energy Infrastructure Security Mobile & Transport Security Mass Events Security Building Security Investment Forecasting Integrator Profiling Distribution Channel Analysis Feasibility & Launch Studies Value Chain Analysis Risk Intelligence Analysis Competitor Profiling Geopolitical Scenario Analysis Security Policy Analysis Threat Assessment Policy & Regulation Factor Impact Analysis Competition Demand Characteristics Scenarios Key Success Factors Forecasting

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