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Slide 1: 

WELCOME HAND TOOL SAFETY CORPORATE SAFETY TRAINING 29 CFR 1910

Slide 2: 

Discuss Program Requirements. Discuss The Types of Tools. Discuss Selection Criteria. Discuss Inspection Requirements. Discuss Basic Skills in Hazard Recognition & Control. Discuss OSHA’S Requirements for Tool Safety. Discuss Tool Safety’s Role in Today’s Industry. Discuss Use, Storage and Maintenance Requirements. COURSE OBJECTIVES

APPLICABLE REGULATIONS : 

29CFR - SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS 1910 - INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 241 - DEFINITIONS 242 - HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS 243 - GUARDING OF PORTABLE POWER TOOLS 244 - OTHER PORTABLE TOOLS & EQUIPMENT 132 - PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT APPLICABLE REGULATIONS

Slide 4: 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Establish a Written Program Conduct Tool Safety Training Conduct Work Area Inspections Ensure all Modified Tools are Safe Provide the Proper Tool for the Job Maintain all Tools in Safe Condition Conduct Regular Program Evaluations Replace Worn or Broken Tools in a Timely Manner ALL EMPLOYERS MUST:

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Establish Proficiency in The Use of Tools. Explain Inspection Requirements of Tools. Conduct Training Prior to Job Assignment. Explain Why a Particular Tool has been Selected. Explain Proper Maintenance and Storage of Tools. Explain the Potential Problems Associated with Tools. Explain The Nature, Extent and Effects of Tool Hazards. Explain The Operation, Capabilities, and Limitations of Tools. THE EMPLOYER MUST PROVIDE TRAINING:

Slide 6: 

REQUIRED WHEN THERE IS A: New Hazard or Tools. Program Related Injury. Change in Job Assignment. New Hazard Control Methods. Failure in the Safety Procedures. Reason to Doubt Employee Proficiency. RETRAINING REQUIREMENTS

TOOL TRAINING IS IMPORTANT : 

TOOL TRAINING IS IMPORTANT Reduce injury and illness rates. Acceptance of high-turnover jobs. Workers feel better about their work. Reduce workers’ compensation costs. Elevate OSHA compliance to a higher level. A GOOD PROGRAM WILL HELP:

TOOL TRAINING IS PREVENTION : 

“It is estimated that in the United States, 97% of the money spent for medical care is directed toward treatment of an illness, injury or disability. Only 3% is spent on prevention.” Self-help Manual for your Back H. Duane Saunders, MSPT by Educational Opportunities TOOL TRAINING IS PREVENTION

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION : 

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION DEDICATION PERSONAL INTEREST MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT IMPLEMENTATION OF A TOOL SAFETY PROGRAM REQUIRES: NOTE: UNDERSTANDING AND SUPPORT FROM THE WORK FORCE IS ESSENTIAL, WITHOUT IT THE PROGRAM WILL FAIL!

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION : 

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION Establish responsibility. Establish a corporate policy and develop rules. Conduct a tool safety survey of the facility. Eliminate hazardous tools where possible. Conduct employee training. Provide protection where hazard elimination is not possible. Perform inspections and maintenance. Periodically audit the program. Modify policies and rules as appropriate. DEVELOPMENT SEQUENCE: Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY RECOGNITION CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY ASSESSMENT OF TOOL HAZARDS: Known jobs/areas having high tool usage. Jobs/areas having had recent operational changes. Jobs/areas with new equipment or processes. New jobs having little or no statistical injury data. RECOGNITION Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

RECOGNITION CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY EVALUATION Facility audit data. Employee surveys. Accident investigations. Logs of employee complaints. Statistical evidence of known/potential hazards. Injury and illness data of known/potential hazards. Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

RECOGNITION CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION Written program. Training program. Employee involvement. Supervisor involvement. Corrective action program. Job hazard analysis program. Safety in purchasing (new tools, equipment etc.) IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

RECOGNITION CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY CONTROL Periodic facility audits. Written program reviews. Employee feedback surveys. Job hazard analysis reviews. Recurrent training programs. Supervisor feedback surveys. Periodic statistical evaluations. Corrective action follow-up measures. Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY CONTROL MEASURES CONSIDERATIONS: Capital improvement plan to eliminated hazards. Costs involved in purchasing new tools. Length of time necessary for implementation. Level of urgency in implementation. Compatibility with existing controls. Anticipated problems with employee use. Continued

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY : 

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY PRIORITIZATION CONSIDERATIONS: Severity of injuries as a result of hazards. Consequences of an injury at the worksite. Likelihood that the operation will have an injury. The length of exposure to the hazard. Long-term effects of hazardous tool use. Continued

THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE : 

THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING: 1. GET INVOLVED IN THE TOOL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS. 2. OBTAIN ASSISTANCE (IF NEEDED) FROM EXPERTS IN THE FIELD OF CONCERN. 3. COMPLETE THE PAPERWORK (WORK ORDERS, POLICY CHANGES, ETC.) TO MAKE CORRECTIVE ACTIONS. 4. ATTEND THE SAME TRAINING AS YOUR WORKERS. 5. FOLLOW-UP ON THE ACTIONS YOU TOOK.

TOOL DESIGN AND SELECTION : 

TOOL DESIGN AND SELECTION Carefully Match the Tool to Job. The Specific Use of the Tool Is Critical. Contact Manufactures for Their Assistance. Make Informed Decisions Before You Buy. Don’t be Fooled by Misleading Advertising. INITIAL CONSIDERATIONS:

TOOL DESIGN AND SELECTION : 

TOOL DESIGN AND SELECTION Handles that Distribute Pressure Across the Palm. Designed to Provide the Required Force. Varied Weights, Designs to Accommodate All Workers. Handle Orientations That Allow Straight Wrists. Minimal Hand and Arm Vibration. Minimal Repetitive Motion Requirements. Minimal Need to Assume Awkward Positions. FAVORABLE CHARACTERISTICS:

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION GENERAL SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS Don’t be afraid to ask people to wait! Limit conversation while using tools Know that you could be seriously injured Know that no one ever expected to get injured Know that none of us is immune to injury Know the safe procedures before starting work Know the location of first aid kits Avoid reaching across working areas Avoid horseplay - don’t tolerate it from others Do not force tools - ever Think about going home in the same shape

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION AXES Select the correct size axe for the job Keep axes sharp for faster chopping Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut Use thin-bladed axes for hard wood Use thick-bladed axes for soft wood Ensure that a safe swing radius exists Check handles regularly for splits Check the axe head for looseness Re-wedge axe heads as required Consider durability and life expectancy Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued BITS Select the correct size bit for the job Keep bits sharp for better cutting Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut Store bits out of the way in a rack Handle bits carefully Scrapes and cuts result easily Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued CHISELS Select the correct chisel for the job Keep chisels sharp Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut Redress or discard mushroomed heads Consider hazard effects on by-standers Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued WOOD CHISELS Select the correct chisel for the job Keep chisels sharp Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut Always drive the chisel away from the body Remove nails and metal before use Never pry with a chisel or use as a wedge Always store properly Consider hazard effects on by-standers Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued CROWBARS & PRYBARS Select the correct tool for the job Use only approved crowbars Do not use “cheater” bars with crowbars Use a block of wood under head Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut Always store properly Consider hazard effects on by-standers Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued CUTTERS Keep cutters sharp Cut away from the body Never use cutters near live circuits Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut Consider durability and life expectancy It is unsafe to overload a light duty tool Keep a gloved hand over parts that can fly Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued TIN SNIPS Keep snips sharp Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Use one hand to hold snips Use the other hand to hold the material Do not lean over to cut material Do not apply excessive pressure Never “hammer” to increase leverage Never “step-on” to increase leverage Use heavier duty snips for added pressure Keep a gloved hand over parts that can fly Operate snips in short, creeping bites Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued FILES Always use an approved handle Avoid awkward postures when using a file Have secure footing before applying pressure Keep files clean - they require less force Always use a file card to clean a file Never strike a file to dislodge debris Keep a gloved hand over parts that can fly Consider durability and life expectancy Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued HACKSAWS Apply pressure on the downward stroke only Avoid twisting the blade - breakage can occur Avoid heating the blade by cutting too fast Keep saws clean - they require less force Apply light machine oil to lubricate the blade Never strike blade to dislodge debris Never hang saws overhead on hooks Consider durability and life expectancy Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued SAWS Use slow, careful, downward strokes Apply pressure on the downward stroke only Avoid twisting the blade - breakage can occur Keep saws clean - they require less force Replace saws with broken teeth Do not allow the material to “pinch” the saw Never hang saws overhead on hooks Always properly stow saws Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued HAMMERS Take care in selecting the correct hammer Hammer handles come in a variety of styles Carefully inspect at regular intervals When replacing heads securely attach the handle Never strike hardened steel surfaces Use plastic, wood, or soft metal on steel Use riveting hammers for sheet steel Use claw hammers for removing nails Use ball-peen hammers for metal work Consider durability and life expectancy Always wear personal protective equipment

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued HOOKS Avoid overloading Keep hooks sharp Shield the point of the hook Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than hook Never use hooks near live circuits PLANES Keep planes sharp Store in racks designed to protect them Hold material securely in vises or clamps

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued KNIVES Keep knives sharp Sharp tools are safer than dull ones Dull edges can slip off rather than cut It is unsafe to overload a light duty tool Use hand guards, mesh gloves etc. Try to cut away from the body Store knives in a sheath or holder Never leave knives lying around

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued PLIERS Apply pressure across the line Never substitutes pliers for a wrench Use insulated grips for electrical work Ensure insulated grips are free of cracks etc. Always wear safety glasses when cutting wire Keep a gloved hand over parts that can fly

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued WRENCHES Always use the correct wrench for the job Never use a hammer on an open end wrench “Cheater bars” should not be used on wrenches Never use pipe wrenches on nuts or bolts Use box-end wrenches on “frozen” nuts Use socket wrenches in hard-to-reach areas Remember that wrenches are conductive

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued SCREWDRIVERS Never carry in clothing pockets Select correct tip size for the object Do not use if screwdriver tip is twisted Do not use if screwdriver tip is damaged Keep free hand clear when applying pressure “Cheater bars” should never be used Remember that screwdrivers are conductive Never use a screwdriver as a: - Chisel - Punch - Wedge - Prybar . . . . etc. etc. etc.

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION : 

SELECTION & HAZARD RECOGNITION Continued JACKS Inspect every six months Check the capacity plate Know the jacks capacity Check for hydraulic leaks Check holding fixture before use Remove handle when relocating the jack Always use jacks on a stable, level surface Set the jack at the same angle as load Use wedges or shims to prevent slippage Use blocking as back-up to support load Remove handle after load is raised Keep hands free of oil and grease

HAND TOOL STORAGE : 

HAND TOOL STORAGE TOOL CONTROL Mark tools to discourage pilferage Number tools to identify a specific tool Consider color coding matched against machines Issue (control ) from a central location (tool crib) Ensure attendants know serviceability requirements Store heavier tools low, lighter tools higher Store sharp edges or tripping hazards inward Inspect tool belts regularly Set up records to cover: - Repair - Replacement - Budgeting - Inventory - Inspection - Replacement Parts

HAND TOOL MAINTENANCE : 

HAND TOOL MAINTENANCE TOOL MAINTENANCE Know the manufacturer’s recommendations Frequently inspect tools Document periodic inspections of tools Sharpen and dress tools as required Remove defective tools from service immediately Check adjustments and lubrication requirements Establish: - Wear limits - Frequency of use limits - Inspection guidelines

MODIFIED HAND TOOLS : 

MODIFIED HAND TOOLS TOOL MODIFICATION Document the modification Control the general practice in the facility Determine if a safer tool can be purchased Identify the specific use of the modified tool Identify prohibited uses of the modified tool Identify employees authorized to use the tool Issue the tool only after training on its use Have a “Competent Person” authorize the modification Inspect the tool before and after it is used

Slide 45: 

Develop a detailed inspection policy. Document each inspection. Inspect all tools before issue or use. Tag as unusable, damaged equipment. Inspect equipment before each use (without exception). Separate damaged tools from serviceable tools. Consider the effects on tools stored for long periods. Remove damaged tools from service immediately. Continued INSPECTION CONSIDERATIONS: INSPECTION AND CARE OF TOOLS

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