16. STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT I SLIDES

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40RT - LECTURE 16 : 

40RT - LECTURE 16 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT I

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I How can we define SHRD? How does SHRD relate to overall corporate strategy? What are the triggers for the development of SHRD? External Internal What are the characteristics of SHRD? Garavan (1991) McCracken & Wallace (2000) Do we need to redefine SHRD?

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Strategic HRD SHRD is “concerned with the management of employee learning for the long term keeping in mind the explicit corporate and business strategies” (Garavan 1991: 17) “Strategic HRD is development that operates within an overall strategic framework. Business-led HRD is development that is responsive to the business needs of an organisation” (Harrison 1997: XV)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Strategy “the process by which the basic mission and objectives of the organisation are set, and the process by which the organisation uses its resources to achieve those objectives” (Tichy, Fombrun and Devanna 1982:47)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Strategy can be: emergent - in response to an evolving situation deliberate - brought about by formulation and implementation (Mintzberg 1987)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Emergent strategy in organisations where there are frequent changes strategy shaping role for HRD adds value at formulation stage Deliberate strategy: more stable and less knowledge intensive organisations strategy supporting role for HRD adds value in the implementation stages (Torraco and Swanson 1995)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I External triggers: (may drive SHRD but not sufficient alone) Legislation Government grants and initiatives product-market changes the drive for quality privatisation, deregulation, acquisitions, mergers etc.. internationalisation of business and increasing globalisation of markets etc...

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Internal triggers: (stabilise and sustain SHRD) systems, philosophy and culture of the organisation changes in organisational structures (e.g. downsizing) organisations becoming more flexible and responsive skills shortages – internal or external labour market greater workforce diversity etc...

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Characteristics of SHRD 1. Integration with organisational missions and goals 2. Top Management support 3. Environmental scanning 4. HRD Policies and plans 5. Line Manager commitment and involvement 6. Existence of complimentary HRM activities 7. Expanded Trainer role 8. Recognition of Culture 9. Emphasis on evaluation (Garavan, 1991)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 1. Integration with organisational missions and goals Vertical integration Strategy implementation - supporting role Strategy formulation - shaping role

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Scale of Training Maturity 6. Training and learning are processes through which strategy is formulated 5. Training and learning help to shape strategy 4. Training is the means for implementing corporate strategy and achieving change 3. Training integrated with operational management 2. Isolated tactical training 1. No systematic training (Lee1996)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 2. Top Management support active involvement key stakeholders leadership rather than just support

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 3. Environmental scanning analysis of external environment for threats & opportunities continuous process not just L&D professionals - partnerships senior mangers specifically in HRD terms

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 4. HRD Policies and plans flow from business policies integrated with business policies strategy is even more vital

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 5. Line Manager Commitment and involvement Need support, but it is reality? Centralising and decentralising trends contradictory or complimentary? “The devolution of responsibility for human resource development to line managers has been seen as a key indicator of the ability to integrate human resource and business strategies” Rainbird (1995: 83)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 6. Existence of complementary HRM activities Horizontal or internal integration HRM/HRD links (Sisson 1989) : if companies neglect to train they become dependent on the external labour market to meet their skills needs HRM strategies can protect the HRD investment HRD = symbolic value & a motivational strategy Strategic partnerships - HRM/HRD

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I “training and development should be regarded as central to anything that can sensibly be termed HRM” (Keep 1989) “effecting change in training and HRD involves thinking in broad HRM terms” (Pettigrew et al 1988)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 7. Expanded Trainer role Facilitators Consultants Change agents Organisational change consultants

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 8. Recognition of Culture awareness of cultural issues different role: Adaptive change role - maintenance Adoptive change role - change Innovative feedback role - influence (Talbot, 1993) develop, enhance, influence, change culture?

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 9. Emphasis on evaluation not just effectiveness ultimate value results & business outcomes cost effectiveness

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I 1. Integration with org. missions and goals 2. Top Management support 3. Environmental scanning 4. HRD plans and policies 5. Line manager commitment & involvement 6. Existence of complementary HRM activities 7. Expanded Trainer role 8. Recognition of culture 9. Emphasis on evaluation (Garavan 1991) 1. Shaping org. missions and goals 2. Top Management leadership 3. Env. scanning by senior mgt. specifically in HRD terms 4. HRD strategies, policies & plans 5. Strategic partnerships with line management 6. Strategic partnerships with HRM 7. Trainers as organisational change consultants 8. Ability to influence corp. culture 9. Emphasis on cost effectiveness evaluation (McCracken & Wallace, 2000)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I Training reactive role - supporting strategy admin/delivery focus no evidence of the 9 Garavan (1991) SHRD characteristics Strategically immature No learning culture

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I HRD systematic implementation role - supporting strategy internal learning consultancy focus All 9 Garavan (1991) SHRD characteristics in place Strategically quite mature Weak learning culture

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I SHRD Proactive role in strategy shaping Strategic change focus all 9 enhanced SHRD characteristics in place (McCracken & Wallace, 2000) Strategically very mature Strong learning culture

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I SHRD redefined: “the creation of a learning culture, within which a range of training, development and learning strategies both respond to corporate strategy and also help to shape and influence it” (McCracken & Wallace, 2000)

STRATEGIC HRD I : 

STRATEGIC HRD I So much for the theory, but what about reality?

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