Connectors

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SENTENCE CONNECTORS : 

SENTENCE CONNECTORS A connector is a word that is used to join words or sentences. Today’s Lesson: LDA

Slide 2: 

In this lesson, I would like to introduce connectors and words that are commonly used in professional, business, and university writing.  Although the words have different grammatical names, they share one thing in common: they all continue or add to ideas that were written in the preceding sentence.

Examples : 

Examples And Or But Coordinating Conjunctions Coordinating conjunctions join together clauses of equal importance.

Other examples: : 

Other examples: Furthermore Nevertheless Not only ... but also Yet As long as until Additionally In Addition Also Moreover As well as

Slide 5: 

The best way to explain how to use these words is to simply give you examples.  One thing they all have in common is that they are usually attached to clauses.  That means they are attached to a group of words that contains a subject and a verb.

AND- is used as a conjunction when the words or phrases are of equal importance and both conditions exist. : 

AND- is used as a conjunction when the words or phrases are of equal importance and both conditions exist. A boy and a girl. Girl AND Boy

AND : 

AND Tom and Harry play hockey. A lion and a fox live in this cave. We need some gloves and a ball in addition to bats. An elephant and a giraffe

BUT--is used to show a contradiction between two phrases. : 

BUT--is used to show a contradiction between two phrases. He ran, but he missed the bus. Oh NO!

BUT : 

BUT She studied hard but could not score well in the test. The hill was very steep but the old man could climb it easily. BUT

The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research. : 

The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research. It has hundreds of the most respected magazines and journals in the world.

Moreover : 

Moreover The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research.  Moreover, it has hundreds of the most respected magazines and journals in the world

In addition : 

In addition The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research.  In addition, it has hundreds of the most respected magazines and journals in the world.

As well : 

As well The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research.  It has hundreds of the most respected magazines and journals in the world as well.

Too : 

Too The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research.  It has hundreds of the most respected magazines and journals in the world, too.

OR : 

OR Use of 'Or’ is When we need to express a choice between two words or phrases. sad OR happy

OR : 

OR Would you take a cup of tea or coffee? Shall we buy a book or a toy? Sit on the bench or on the grass. Are you tired or shall we go out for a walk? We can learn to talk English or we can depend on sign language.

RULES TO REMEMBER: : 

RULES TO REMEMBER: These words are not interchangeable.   In other words, you cannot remove one of these words and add any other.

Slide 18: 

2. In general, do not use two of these words or phrases in the same sentence.  The following sentence is incorrect/wrong: My professor is an extremely fascinating person.  Furthermore, she tells some of the most interesting stories I have ever heard as well.

Slide 19: 

In general, when you use these words and connectors, make sure the two sentences/ideas are related.  >> example: The library on 5th Avenue in New York City is one of the best places to do research.  Furthermore, lots of people like to go to libraries to read.

Slide 20: 

Don't overuse connectors!  It is unnecessary to use them everywhere in your writing.  Use connectors when you want to do the following: clearly show a relationship between ideas add information that builds on the idea in the preceding sentence

Slide 21: 

5. Note When to USE semicolons and Commas. ; ,

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