Water Pollution

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“Water Pollution” : 

“Water Pollution”

Causes: : 

Causes: Pesticides that get applied to farm fields and roadsides—and homeowners' lawns—run off into local streams and rivers or drain down into groundwater, contaminating the fresh water that fish swim in and the water we humans drink.

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WATER POLLUTION CAUSES — #2 Fertilizers / Nutrient Pollution Many causes of pollution, including sewage, manure, and chemical fertilizers, contain "nutrients" such as nitrates and phosphates. Deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (from nitrogen oxides) also causes nutrient-type water pollution.

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WATER POLLUTION CAUSES — #3 Oil, Gasoline and Additives Oil spills like the Exxon Valdez spill off the coast of Alaska or the more recent Prestige spill off the coast of Spain get lots of news coverage, and indeed they do cause major water pollution and problems for local wildlife, fishermen, and coastal businesses. But the problem of oil polluting water goes far beyond catastrophic oil spills. Land-based petroleum pollution is carried into waterways by rainwater runoff.

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WATER POLLUTION CAUSES — #4 Mining Mining causes water pollution in a number of ways: The mining process exposes heavy metals and sulfur compounds that were previously locked away in the earth. Rainwater leaches these compounds out of the exposed earth, resulting in "acid mine drainage" and heavy metal pollution that can continue long after the mining operations have ceased.

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Similarly, the action of rainwater on piles of mining waste (tailings) transfers pollution to freshwater supplies

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In the case of gold mining, cyanide is intentionally poured on piles of mined rock (a leach heap) to chemically extract the gold from the ore. Some of the cyanide ultimately finds its way into nearby water.

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Huge pools of mining waste "slurry" are often stored behind containment dams. If a dam leaks or bursts, water pollution is guaranteed.

Effects: : 

Effects: WATER POLLUTION EFFECTS – Category 1 Waterborne Infectious Diseases Human infectious diseases are among the most serious effects of water pollution, especially in developing countries, where sanitation may be inadequate or non-existent. Waterborne diseases occur when parasites or other disease-causing microorganisms are transmitted via contaminated water, particularly water contaminated by pathogens originating from excreta. These include typhoid, intestinal parasites, and most of the enteric and diarrheal diseases caused by bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Among the most serious parasitic diseases are amoebiasis, giardiasis, ascariasis, and hookworm.

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WATER POLLUTION EFFECTS – Category 2 Nutrient Pollution The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution calls nutrient pollution the most widespread, chronic environmental problem in the coastal ocean. The discharges of nitrogen, phosphorus, and other nutrients come from agriculture, waste disposal, coastal development, and fossil fuel use. Once nutrient pollution reaches the coastal zone, it stimulates harmful overgrowths of algae, which can have direct toxic effects and ultimately result in low-oxygen conditions.

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WATER POLLUTION EFFECTS – Category 3 Chemical Contamination Over the years, many types of chemicals have gotten into our waterways—and they continue to do so today. Chemical water pollution typically occurs because ... the chemicals were dumped into the water intentionally; the chemicals seeped into groundwater, streams, or rivers because of failing pipes or storage tanks;

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the chemicals catastrophically contaminated waterways because of industrial accidents; the pollution settled out of polluted air (or was precipitated out of polluted air); or chemicals were leached out of contaminated soil.

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Spills and leaks: Whether it's a leak in the containment system of a cyanide leach heap or a breach in a coal-slurry impoundment dam, the result is the same—pollution of streams, rivers, and groundwater, killing aquatic life and poisoning drinking water.

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WATER POLLUTION EFFECTS – Category 5 Marine Debris Marine debris is basically trash in the ocean. Trash fouls inland waterways too, for sure, but trash seems to be a particular problem in our seas. The Ocean Conservancy calls marine debris one of the world's most pervasive marine pollution problems

Project Of Government : 

Project Of Government The Clean Water Act Law of the Philippines: The Use of Incentives to Promote Investments The Philippines is once known to be relatively abundant in water resources. However, the pressures of population growth, urbanization, and industrialization placed a toll on the resource. One of the most pressing concerns is the increased competition in the various uses of water. There is also serious concern regarding watershed degradation and unmonitored extraction of groundwater by illegal users. The Clean Water Act Law of the Philippines aims to promote and encourage the protection of the country’s water resources. To fully encourage local governments, water districts, communities, and the private sector to partake in efforts on reducing water pollution, provisions on incentives are provided for in the law. Date posted:  Jan 26 2010 Responsible Party: Compliance

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The Philippines is once known to be relatively abundant in water resources. However, the pressures of population growth, urbanization, and industrialization placed a toll on the resource. One of the most pressing concerns is the increased competition in the various uses of water. There is also serious concern regarding watershed degradation and unmonitored extraction of groundwater by illegal users. At the same time, pressing issues on water pollution is present. From a World Bank study, 90% of the sewage generated in the country is not treated. Major rivers and waterways are also confronted with pollution and degradation due to the encroachment of settlers, especially in urban centers. The Clean Water Act Law of the Philippines aims to promote and encourage the protection of the country’s water resources. To fully encourage local governments, water districts, communities, and the private sector to partake in efforts on reducing water pollution, provisions on incentives are provided for in the law.

Suggestions: : 

Suggestions: Do not throw garbage in the sea,rivers,lakes,and other body of water. Have a self discipline in throwing garbage.

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Eralyn Joy Santos Hershey Ramos Benjamin De Leon Christian Samillano

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