art of questioning

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ART OF QUESTIONING : 

ART OF QUESTIONING Joanna Marie A. Nadales 2005-10422 BSEd- Mathematics EDSC121 Report January 21, 2010

Slide 2: 

“ What ART was at the ancient world, SCIENCE is to the modern. “ -Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) Coningsby

Slide 3: 

“Just as an artist mixes different colors to develop various tones and hues, a science teacher uses several methods of teaching to develop various objectives.”

ART OF QUESTIONING : 

ART OF QUESTIONING Definition Types of questions Discussion Method Recitation Method Purpose of questioning Characteristics of Effective Questions

What is a question ??? : 

What is a question ??? The word question came from the Latin word quaero, meaning “to ask”

THE ART OF QUESTIONING : 

THE ART OF QUESTIONING The use of question-based approach and strategies “essential to the development of a vocabulary, that will speed comprehension of significant principles or laws”.

Types of QuestionsTeachers Ask Pupils : 

Types of QuestionsTeachers Ask Pupils I. OPEN QUESTIONS One that pupils recognize can have many acceptable answers. CLOSED QUESTIONS - One that pupils recognize as having only one answer

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Closed Questions - convergent questions To gather feedback about understanding or recall of a certain fact usually use during recitation - teacher’s traditional mode of teaching

Importance of Closed Questions : 

Importance of Closed Questions - review before an exam Review for re-enforcement or for purpose of clarification. should give most students a feeling of preparation

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Open questions Divergent questions Spark discussions -Teacher’s constructivist/ inquiry-based teaching

RULE: : 

RULE: Questions that begin with WHY should be expressed into HOW and WHAT questions.

Identify which are open and closed questions? : 

Identify which are open and closed questions? Given this proportion, 55 : 110 = 1 : x what is the value of x? Given this proportion, 55 : 110 = 1 : x what values of x can satisfy the proportion?

Identify which are open and closed questions? : 

Identify which are open and closed questions? What kinds of angles are formed by intersecting lines? What kind of angles are formed by perpendicular lines?

NOTE: : 

NOTE: Examine your question through your students’ responses.

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Consider the type of Thinking Required -demands the pupil to: recall: pupils have to remember knowledge, procedure or formula

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Consider the type of Thinking Required -demands the pupil to: b. make observations: pupils describe what they see

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Consider the type of Thinking Required -demands the pupil to: c. apply reasoning: Using the formula for sale price, Sale price= regular price — (regular price x rate of discount) How do we get the rate of discount?

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Consider the type of Thinking Required -demands the pupil to: d. hypothesize: If a, b, and c are integers, evaluate (a+b)+c and a+(b+c). Compare their values using 2, 3 and 5 for a, b, and c, respectively.

TYPES OF QUESTIONS : 

TYPES OF QUESTIONS Effect on the Pupils encouraged discouraged no effect apparent

Slide 20: 

“Sometimes questions are more important than answers.” - Nancy Willard

PURPOSE OF QUESTIONS : 

PURPOSE OF QUESTIONS Teacher ask questions to CONTROL: behavior learning the pace of the lesson

I. Control of Behavior : 

I. Control of Behavior Questions: focus attention “ Knowledge or low level comprehension are checks on attention “

Slide 23: 

Teacher fires the questions quickly round the class and allows the students little time to contemplate them.

I. Control of Behavior : 

I. Control of Behavior direct students to the events the teacher wants them to focus on, and encourage them to process information instead of working on their memory.

Slide 25: 

“Sino may tanong? Kung ayaw niyong magtanong, ako ang magtatanong.”

II. Control of Learning : 

II. Control of Learning Questions : force students to tap their schemas by linking recently acquired knowledge with older propositions (formal signals) linking than to recall-of-type of questions (informal signals)

II. Control of Learning : 

II. Control of Learning more valuable function of learning is their promotion of deeper understanding. consider students : knowledge [questions should provoke processing] -consider the difficulty of the question -questions to have an effect on understanding and recall, they must be pitched at a level that encourages processing.

Slide 28: 

Higher cognitive questions permit little processing.

A SKILL TO DEVELOP : 

A SKILL TO DEVELOP Judge student’s knowledge: This comes with EXPERIENCE, honed by PRACTICE, and a REFLECTION on the obtained responses from the students.

II. Control of Learning : 

II. Control of Learning more valuable function of learning is their promotion of deeper understanding. consider students : cognitive strategies [ facilitate student learning ] -teacher should involve students to careful gradation of the problem, encouragement of attempts at answering, and discussion of how to think about them.

Slide 31: 

Higher cognitive questions permit little processing. Easy questions also permit little processing.

II. Control of Learning : 

II. Control of Learning more valuable function of learning is their promotion of deeper understanding. consider students : question and answer intervals [ give enough time to permit processing ]

IRF STRUCTURE : 

IRF STRUCTURE Initiation- (FIRST INTERVAL)- Response -longer responses; more confident answers; gave alternative answers; deeper information processing; responsible for the direction of the lesson and learning ( ROWE. 1969, 1974a, 1974b) Response- (SECOND INTERVAL)- Feedback -students contemplate the answer and evaluate- accept, reject, qualify or elaborate it. Longer pauses in the second interval are associated with greater achievement. ( TOBIN. 1980)

II. Control of Learning : 

II. Control of Learning more valuable function of learning is their promotion of deeper understanding. consider students : student knowledge [questions should provoke processing] cognitive strategies [ facilitate student learning ] question and answer intervals [ give enough time to permit processing ]

Slide 35: 

“The test of a good teacher is not how many questions he can ask his pupils that they will answer readily, but how many questions he inspires them to ask him which he finds it hard to answer” – Alice Wellington Rollins

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING mostly questions in a divergent or evaluative form convergent questions are used to carefully analyze a situation, find and correct an error or clarify a point of confusion.

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING keep the question direct and to the point to maximize student response. allot time for students to think teachers should know the question and the ‘answers’.

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING students are held to analyze and think through questions and suggestions of possible paths of learning. address the question to the class first before calling for an individual to respond

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING Teacher’s FAQ: “ Are there any questions? “ This is important after a pupil respond to a question given by the teacher because some students may not have understood their classmate’s answer.

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING Teaching and learning became an interesting and enjoyable enterprise.

REFERENCES: : 

REFERENCES: Lawson, anton E. (1995). Science Teaching and the Development of Thinking. Belmont, California: Wadsworth, Inc. White, Ricahard T. (1988). Learning Science. Oxford, IK: Blackwell. Turner, T. and Di Marco, W. (1998). Learning to Teach Science in the Secondary School. NY: Routledge. Washton, Nathan S. (1967). Teaching Science Creatively in the Secondary Schools. Philadelphia and London: W.B. Saunders Company.