spread spectrum

Views:
 
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

By: sachinsachin (37 month(s) ago)

thanks dear very good tutorial sachin morya Assistant Professor E&C Deptt. Engineering College

By: pushkinsomu (44 month(s) ago)

vry gud presentation

By: hakrajput (55 month(s) ago)

excellent presentation ... Keep it up dude

Presentation Transcript

Wireless Comminication : 

Wireless Comminication SPREAD SPECTRUM

Spread Spectrum : 

Spread Spectrum The spread spectrum techniques was developed initially for military and intelligence requirements. The essential idea is to spread the information signal over a wider bandwidth to make jamming and interception more difficult. In this chapter, we will look some spread spectrum techniques and multiple access technique based on spread spectrum.

Outline : 

Outline

Concept of Spread Spectrum : 

Concept of Spread Spectrum General model of spread spectrum digital communication system.

Concept of Spread Spectrum : 

Concept of Spread Spectrum Input is fed into a channel encoder Produce an analog signal with a relatively narrow bandwidth around some center frequency. Further modulated using a sequence of digits known as a spreading code or spreading sequence. The spreading code is generated by a pseudonoise, or pseudorandom number generator. The effect of this modulation is to increase significantly the bandwidth (spread the spectrum) of the signal to be transmitted. At the receiver, the same digit sequence is used to demodulate the spread spectrum signal. The signal is fed into a channel decoder to recover the data.

Concept of Spread Spectrum : 

Concept of Spread Spectrum What can we gain from this apparent waste of spectrum? Gain immunity from various kinds of noise and multipath distortion Can be used for hiding and encrypting signals. Only a recipient who knows the spreading code can recover the encoded information. Several users can independently use the same higher bandwidth with very little interference (CDMA).

Outline : 

Outline

Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum : 

Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum Basic Approach FHSS Using MFSK FHSS Performance

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum -- FHSS Signal is broadcast over a seemingly random series of radio frequencies, hopping from frequency to frequency at fixed intervals. A receiver, hopping between frequencies in synchronization with the transmitter, picks up the message.

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Advantages Attempts to jam the signal on one frequency only knock out a few bits of it. Would-be eavesdroppers hear only unintelligible blips

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach An example of frequency-hopping signal A number of channels are allocated for the FH signal. Typically, there are 2k carrier frequencies forming 2k channels. The width of each channel corresponds to the bandwidth of the input signal.

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach The transmitter operates in one channel at a time for a fixed interval. During that interval, some number of bits are transmitted using some encoding scheme. The sequence of channels used is dictated by a spreading code. Both transmitter and receiver use the same code to tune into a sequence of channels in synchronization.

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Typical block diagram for a FH system Generate spreading code

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Binary data are fed into a modulator using some modulation scheme (FSK or BPSK) Spreading code (generate by PN sourse) serves as an index into a table of frequencies Each k bits of the spreading code specifies one of the 2k carrier frequencies. At each k PN bits, a new carrier frequency is selected. The signal produced from the initial modulator is modulated by this frequency. Produce a new signal with the same shape but now centered on the selected carrier frequency.

Slide 16: 

[Example] An FHSS system employs a total bandwidth of Ws=400MHz and an individual channel bandwidth of 100Hz. What is the minimum number of PN bits required for each frequency hop?

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach The question is: How does the FH spreader work? (How it move the signal frequency to the selected frequency?)

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Assuming we are using BFSK as the data modulation scheme. Then the output signal from modulator or the input signal to the FH spreader can be defined as:

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach The frequency synthesizer generates a constant-frequency tone. The frequency hops among a set of 2k frequencies. The hopping pattern determined by k bits from the PN sequence. Assume the duration of one hop is the same as the duration of one bit. Ignore phase differences between sd(t) and the spreading signal c(t), or chipping signal.

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach If the frequency of the signal generated by the frequency synthesizer during the ith hop is fi, the product signal p(t) during the ith hop is: Using the trigonometric identity:

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach We can easily get The bandpass filter is used to block the difference frequency and pass the sum frequency, then the spread spectrum signal is

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Thus, during the ith bit interval, the frequency of the spread spectrum signal is f1+fi if the data bit is 1 and f2+fi if the data bit is 0. The central frequency is now moved to f2+fi or f1+fi.

Problems : 

Problems [Problems] How does the FH spreader work when we use BPSK modulation? (How it move the signal frequency to the selected frequency when BPSK is used?)

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach On reception, a signal of the form s(t) just defined will be received. The spread spectrum signal is demodulated using the same sequence of PN-derived frequencies. Then demodulated to produce the output data. How does the receiver work?

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach Signal s(t) is multiplied by a replica of the spreading signal to yield a product signal of the form: Again using the trigonometric identity

Basic Approach : 

Basic Approach At the receiver, the bandpass filter is used to block the sum frequency and pass the difference frequency, then a signal of the form of is yielded.

Problems : 

Problems [Problems] How does the FH despreader work when we use BPSK modulation? (How it move the signal frequency back to the carrier frequency when BPSK is used?)

Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum : 

Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum Basic Approach FHSS Using MFSK FHSS Performance

FHSS using MFSK : 

FHSS using MFSK MFSK is a common modulation technique used in conjunction with FHSS. Recall: MFSK uses M=2L different frequencies to encode the digital input L bits at a time.

FHSS using MFSK : 

FHSS using MFSK For FHSS, the MFSK signal is translated to a new frequency every Tc seconds by modulating the MFSK signal with the FHSS carrier signal. The effect is actually to translate the MFSK signal into the appropriate FHSS channel. For a data rate of R, the duration of a bit is T=1/R seconds and the duration of a signal elements is Ts=LT seconds.

FHSS using MFSK : 

FHSS using MFSK If Tc is greater than or equal to Ts the spreading modulation is referred to as slow-frequency-hop spread spectrum Otherwise it is known as fast-frequency-hop spread spectrum.

FHSS using MFSK : 

FHSS using MFSK [Example 1] If we use the MFSK example from last chapter. M=4, which means that four different frequencies are used to encode the data input 2 bits at a time.

FHSS using MFSK : 

FHSS using MFSK Each signal element is a discrete frequency tone. The total MFSK bandwidth is Wd=Mfd. If we use an FHSS scheme with k=2, there are 4=2k different channels, each of width Wd. The total FHSS bandwidth is Ws=2kWd. Each 2 bits of the PN sequence is used to select one of the four channels. That channel is held for a duration of two signal elements, or four bits (Tc=2Ts=4T)

FHSS using MFSK : 

FHSS using MFSK

Slide 36: 

[Example 2] Using the same MFSK example. M=4 and k=2. Wd=Mfd and Ws=2kWd. However in this case, each signal element is represented by two frequency tones. Then Ts=2Tc=2T.

Slide 38: 

Another two example

Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum : 

Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum Basic Approach FHSS Using MFSK FHSS Performance

FHSS Performance : 

FHSS Performance Typically, a large number of frequencies are used in FHSS so that Ws is much larger than Wd. Large value of k results in a system that is quite resistant to jamming. Suppose MFSK has bandwidth Wd and noise jammer has the same bandwidth. If the jammer has a fixed power Sj on the signal carrier frequency, then the ratio of signal energy per bit to noise power density is:

Slide 43: 

If frequency hopping is used, the jammer must jam all 2k frequencies. For fixed noise power, since Ws=2kWd, this reduces the jamming power density to Sj/(2k Wd). Then The gain in signal-to-noise ratio (the processing gain) is

Slide 44: 

[Example] An FHSS system using MFSK with M=4 employs 1000 different frequencies. What is the processing gain?

Slide 45: 

[Example] The following table illustrates the operation of an FHSS system for one complete period of the PN sequence. What is the period of the PN sequence? The system makes use of a form of FSK, what form of FSK is it? What is the number of bits per symbol? What is the number of FSK frequencies? What is the length of PN sequence per hop? Is this a slow or fast FH system? What is the total number of possible hops?

Slide 47: 

[Example] The following table illustrates the operation of an FHSS system for one complete period of the PN sequence. What is the period of the PN sequence? The system makes use of a form of FSK, what form of FSK is it? What is the number of bits per symbol? What is the number of FSK frequencies? What is the length of PN sequence per hop? Is this a slow or fast FH system? What is the total number of possible hops?

Outline : 

Outline

Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum : 

Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum DSSS Using BPSK DSSS Performance

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum – DSSS Each bit in the original signal is represented by multiple bits in the transmitted signal, using a spreading code. The spreading code spreads the signal across a wider frequency band in direct proportion to the number of bits used. A 10-bit spreading code spreads the signal across a frequency band that is 10 times greater than a 1-bit spreading code.

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK One technique with DSSS is to combine the digital information stream with the spreading code bit stream using an exclusive-OR (XOR). The XOR obeys the following rules:

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK This example shows that An information bit of one inverts the spreading code bits in the combination An information bit of zero causes the spreading code bits to be transmitted without inversion. The combination bit stream has the data rate of the original spreading code sequence, so it has a wider bandwidth than the information stream. In this example, the rate of spreading code bit stream is four times the information rate.

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK A BPSK signal can be expressed as: To produce the DSSS signal, we multiply the above by c(t), which is the PN sequence taking on values of +1 and -1.

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK At the receiver, the incoming signal is multiplied by c(t). Because c(t)×c(t)=1, the original signal is recovered:

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK The DSSS signal expression can be interpreted in two ways, leading two different implementations. First multiply s(t) and c(t) together and then perform the BPSK modulation. Alternatively, we can first perform the BPSK modulation on the data stream s(t) to generate the data signal eBPSK. This signal can then be multiplied by c(t).

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK Transmitter using the second interpretation:

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK Receiver using the second interpretation:

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK [Example]

DSSS Using BPSK : 

DSSS Using BPSK

Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum : 

Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum DSSS Using BPSK DSSS Performance

DSSS Performance : 

DSSS Performance The information signal has a bit width of T, which is equivalent to a data rate of 1/T. the spectrum of the signal depending on the encoding technique, is roughly 2/T. Similarly, the spectrum of the PN signal is 2/Tc. The amount of spreading that is achieved is a direct result of the data rate of the PN stream.

DSSS Performance : 

DSSS Performance

DSSS Performance : 

DSSS Performance Effectiveness against jamming Assume a simple jamming signal at the center frequency of the DSSS system. The jamming signal is: The received signal is

DSSS Performance : 

DSSS Performance The despreader at the receiver multiplies er(t) by c(t), so the signal component due to the jamming signal is: This is simply a BPSK modulation of the carrier tone. Thus the carrier power Sj is spread over a bandwidth of approximately 2/Tc. The BPSK demodulator following the DSSS despreader includes a bandpass filter matched to the BPSK with bandwidth of 2/T. Most of the jamming power is filtered.

DSSS Performance : 

DSSS Performance As an approximation, the jamming power passed by the filter is The jamming power has been reduced by a factor of (Tc/T) through the use of spread sprectrum. The gain in signal-to-noise ratio is:

Outline : 

Outline

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Basic Principles CDMA for DSSS

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access CDMA is a multiplexing technique used with spread spectrum. Assuming data signal with rate D, break each bit into k chips according to a fixed pattern that is specific to each user, called the user’s code. The new channel has a chip data rate of kD chips per second.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access A simple example with k=6. It is simplest to characterize a code as a sequence of 1s and -1s.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Three users A, B and C, each of which is communicating with the same base station receiver R. The code for each user: CA= < 1 -1 -1 1 -1 1> CB= < 1 1 -1 -1 1 1> CC= < 1 1 -1 1 1 -1> The base station receiver is assumed to know user A B C’s code.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access At the receiver If the receiver receives a chip pattern d=<d1 d2 d3 d4 d5 d6> The receiver has user u’s code Cu=< c1 c2 c3 c4 c5 c6 > The receiver performs electronically the following decoding function

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access User A: If A wants to send a ‘1’ bit, A transmits its code as a chip pattern d=< 1 -1 -1 1 -1 1>. If A wants to send a ‘0’ bit, A transmits the complement of its code (1s and -1s reversed) as a chip pattern d=<-1 1 1 -1 1-1>. The code for user A is c=CA= < 1 -1 -1 1 -1 1>

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access User A: If A sends a ‘1’ bit, If A sends a ‘0’ bit Note that it is always the case that -6≤SA(d)≤6 no matter what d is.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access User A: The only d’s resulting in the extreme values of 6 and -6 are A’s code and its complement respectively. If SA produces a +6, received a 1 bit from A If SA produces a -6, received a 0 bit from A Otherwise we assume that someone else is sending information or there is an error.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access If user B is sending and we try to received it with SA, that means we are decoding the received chip pattern with the wrong code (CA). If B sends a 1 bit, then d= < 1 1 -1 -1 1 1>, c=CA= < 1 -1 -1 1 -1 1> Since SA=0, we know that someone else apart from A is sending information (in this case is user B). If B had sent a 0 bit, the decoder would produce a value of 0 for SA again.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access If the decoder is linear and if A and B transmit signals dA and dB respectively, at the same time, then since equal to 0 when it is decoded by A’s code. The code of A and B that have the property that are called orthogonal code.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Transmission from A and B, receiver attempts to recover A’s transmission Transmission from A and B, receiver attempts to recover B’s transmission

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Transmission from A and B, receiver attempts to recover A’s transmission Transmission from A and B, receiver attempts to recover B’s transmission

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Such code are very nice but there are not many of them. More common is the case that is small in absolute value when X≠Y. Then it is easy to distinguish between the two cases when X=Y and when X≠Y. In our example, but , in the latter case the C signal would make a small contribution to the decoded signal.

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Transmission from B and C, receiver attempts to recover C’s transmission

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access (f) Transmission from B and C, receiver attempts to recover B’s transmission Transmission from B and C, receiver attempts to recover C’s transmission

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Using the decoder Su, the receiver can sort out transmission from u even when there may be other users broadcasting in the same cell. In practice, the CDMA receiver can filter out the contribution from unwanted users or they appear as low-level noise. However the system breaks down: if there are many users competing for the channel with the user the receiver is trying to listen to if the signal power of one or more competing signals is too high (perhaps because it is very near the receiver)

Code Division Multiple Access : 

Code Division Multiple Access Basic Principles CDMA for DSSS

CDMA for DSSS : 

CDMA for DSSS Look at CDMA from the viewpoint of a DSSS system using BPSK.

CDMA for DSSS : 

CDMA for DSSS There are n users, each transmitting using a different orthogonal PN sequence. For each user, the data stream di(t) is BPSK modulated to produce a signal with a bandwidth of Ws and then multiplied by the spreading code ci(t) for that user. All of the signals, plus noise, are received at the receiver’s antenna.

CDMA for DSSS : 

CDMA for DSSS Suppose that the receiver is attempting to recover the data of user 1. The incoming signal is multiplied by the spreading code of user 1 and them demodulated. The effect of this is to narrow the bandwidth of that portion of the incoming signal corresponding to user 1 to the original bandwidth of unspread signal, which is proportional to the data rate. Because the remainder of the incoming signal is orthogonal to the spreading code of user 1, that remainder still has the bandwidth Ws.

CDMA for DSSS : 

CDMA for DSSS Thus the unwanted signal energy remains spread over a large bandwidth and the wanted signal is concentrated in a narrow bandwidth. The bandpass filter at the demodulator can therefore recover the desired signal.

Outline : 

Outline

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences Spreading consists of multiplying the input data by the spreading sequence, where the bit rate of the spreading sequence is higher than that of the input data. When the signal is received, the spreading is removed by multiplying with the same spreading code, exactly synchronized with the received signal.

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences Spreading code: There should be an approximately equal number of ones and zeros in the spreading code. Few or no repeated patterns In CDMA application, further requirement of lack of correlation Two general categories of spreading sequences: PN sequences Orthogonal codes

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences PN Sequences Orthogonal Code Multiple Spreading

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences PN Sequences PN Properties LFSR implementation M-Sequences Properties

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences Ideal spreading sequence would be a random sequence of binary ones and zeros. It is required that transmitter and receiver must have a copy of the random bit stream. A predictable way is needed to generate the same bit stream at the transmitter and receiver and also retain the desirable properties of a random bit stream. A PN generator can meet this requirement.

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences A PN generator will produce a periodic sequence that eventually repeats but that appears to be random. PN sequences are generated by an algorithm using some initial value called the seed. The algorithm is deterministic and therefore produces sequences of numbers that are not statistically random. But if the algorithm is good, the resulting sequences will pass many reasonable tests of randomness. Such numbers are often referred to as pseudorandom numbers, or pseudorandom sequences. Unless you know the algorithm and the seed, it is impractival to predict the sequence.

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences PN properties: Randomness Unpredictability Two criteria are used to validate that a sequence of numbers is random Uniform distribution Independence

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences Uniform distribution: The distribution of numbers in the sequence should be uniform The frequency of occurrence of each of the numbers should be approximately the same. For a stream of binary digits, we need to expand on this definition.

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences For a stream of binary digits, two properties are desired: Balance property: in a long sequence the fraction of binary ones should approach ½. Run property: a run is defined as a sequence of all 1s or a sequence of all 0s. The appearance of the alternate digit is the beginning of a new run. About ½ of the runs should be of length 1, ¼ of length 2, 1/8 of length3, and so on. 000100110101111

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences Independence: No one value in the sequence can be inferred from the others. No such test to “prove” independence A number of tests can be applied to demonstrate that a sequence does not exhibit independence. General strategy is to apply a number of such tests until confidence that independence exists is sufficiently strong.

PN Sequences : 

PN Sequences In applications such as spread spectrum, Correlation property is required. If a period of the sequence is compared term by term with any cycle shift of itself, the number of terms that are the same differs from those that are different by at most 1.

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences PN Sequences PN Properties LFSR implementation M-Sequences Properties

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Linear Feedback Shift Register Implementation: a circuit consisting of XOR gates and a shift register implementing the PN generator for spread spectrum A string of 1-bit storage devices. Each device has an output line, which indicates the value currently stored, and an input line. At discrete time instants, known as clock times, the value in the storage device is replaced by the value indicated by its input line. The entire LFSR is clocked simultaneously, causing a 1-bit shift along the entire register.

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation The circuit is implemented as follows: The LFSR contains n bits. There are from 1 to (n-1) XOR gates. The presence or absence of a gate corresponds to the presence or absence of a term in the generator polynomial (explained subsequently), P(X), excluding the Xn term.

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Two equivalent ways of characterizing the PN LFSR: A sum of XOR terms Generator polynomial

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Fig: Binary Linear Feedback Shift Register Sequence Generator

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation An actual implementation would not have the multiple circuits; instead, for Ai=0, the corresponding XOR circuit is eliminated. [Example] A 4-bit LFSR:

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Advantages of shift register technique: The sequences generated can be nearly random with long periods LFSRs are easy to implement in hardware and can run at high speeds (this is important because the spreading rate is higher than the data rate)

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Output of n-bit LFSR: Is periodic with maximum period N=2n-1. All-zeros sequence occurs if the initial contents of the LFSR are all zero or the coefficients of Bn are all zero (no feedback) When a period of N is given, a feedback configuration can always be found, the resulting sequence are called maximal-length sequences, or m-sequences.

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Step-by-step operation of the 4-bit LFSR with an initial state of 1000 (B3=1, B2=0, B1=0, B1=0).

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation The period of the sequence, or the length of the m-sequence: 24-1=15. the output repeats after 15 bits. The same periodic m-sequence is generated regardless of the initial state of the LFSR (except for 0000). With each different initial state, the m-sequence begins at a different point in its cycle.

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation For any given size of LFSR, a number of different unique m-sequences can be generated by using different values for the Ai. The table next page shows the sequence length and number of unique m-sequences that can be generated for LFSRs of various sizes, also an example generating polynomial.

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Bn for

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation One useful attribute of the generator polynomial is that it can be used to find sequence generated by the corresponding LFSR, by taking the reciprocal of the polynomial. [Example] A three bit LSFR with P(X)=1+X+X3, we perform the division 1/(1+X+X3).

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation Watch out: The subtractions are done modulo 2, or using the XOR function, in this case, subtraction produces the same result as addition.

LFSR implementation : 

LFSR implementation So the result of 1/(1+X+X3) is 1+X+X2 +(0×X3)+X4+(0×X5) +(0×X6) after which the pattern repeats. This means that the shift register output is 1110100 Because the period of this sequence is 7=23-1, this is an m-sequence.

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences PN Sequences PN Properties LFSR implementation M-Sequences Properties

M-Sequences : 

M-Sequences M-sequences have several properties that make them attractive for spread spectrum applications: Property 1. m-sequence has 2n-1 ones and 2n-1-1 zeros. Property 2. If we slide a window of length n along the output sequence for N shifts (where N=2n-1), each n-tuple appears exactly once. 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 111, 110, 101, 010, 100, 001, 011

M-Sequences : 

M-Sequences Property 3. There is one run of ones of length n; one run of zeros of length n-1; one run of ones and one run of zeros of length n-2; two runs of ones and two runs of zeros of length n-3; and in general, 2n-3 runs of ones and 2n-3 runs of zeros of length 1. When n=4, N=15, 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 run of ‘1’s of length 4 1 run of ‘0’s of length 3 1 run of ‘1’s and 1 run of ‘0’s of length 2 2 runs of ‘1’s and 2 runs of ‘0’s of length 1 (2n-3 =2)

M-Sequences : 

M-Sequences Correlation is the concept of determining how much similarity one set of data has with another. Correlation is defined with a range between -1 and 1 with the following meanings: Value 1, the second sequence matches the first sequence exactly Value 0, there is no relation at all Value -1, the two sequences are mirror images of each other. Other value indicate a partial degree of correlation.

Slide 126: 

Autocorrelation is the correlation of a sequence with all phase shifts of itself. Cross correlation function: the comparison is made between two sequences from different sources ranther than a shifted copy of a sequence with itself. It is defined as:

M-Sequences : 

M-Sequences Property 4. For many applications, the 0,1 sequence is changed to a ±1 sequence. Tthe periodic autocorrelation of the resulting sequence is: The periodic autocorrelation of a ±1 m-sequence is:

M-Sequences : 

M-Sequences

M-Sequences : 

M-Sequences The cross correlation between an m-sequence and noise is low This property is useful to the receiver in filtering out noise The cross correlation between two different m-sequences is low This property is useful for CDMA applications Enables a receiver to discriminate among spread spectrum signals generated by different m-sequences

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences PN Sequences Orthogonal Code Multiple Spreading

Orthogonal Code : 

Orthogonal Code Orthogonal Code: a ser of sequences in which all pairwise cross correlations are zero. An orthogonal set of sequences is characterized by the following equality: For CDMA, each user uses one of the sequences in the set as a spreading code, providing zero cross correlation among all users.

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences Orthogonal Code Walsh Codes Variable-length Orthogonal code

Walsh Codes : 

Walsh Codes Walsh codes: the most common orthogonal codes used in CDMA applications. A set of Walsh codes of length n consists of the n rows of an n×n Walsh matrix. The matrix is defined recursively as: Where n is the dimension of the matrix and the overscore denotes the logical NOT of the bits in the matrix.

Walsh Codes : 

Walsh Codes The Walsh matrix has the property that every row is orthogonal to every other row and to the logical NOT of every other row. The next figure shows the Walsh matrices of dimensions 2, 4 and 8. Recall that to compute the cross correlation, we replace 1 with +1 and 0 with -1.

Walsh Codes : 

Walsh Codes

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences Orthogonal Code Walsh Codes Variable-length Orthogonal code

Variable-length Orthogonal code : 

Variable-length Orthogonal code 3G mobile CDMA systems are designed to support users at a number of different data rates. Effective support can be provided by using spreading codes at different rates while maintaining orthogonality. Suppose that the minimum data rate to be supported is Rmin and that all other data rate are related by power of 2.

Variable-length Orthogonal code : 

Variable-length Orthogonal code If a spreading sequence of length N is used for the Rmin data rate, such that each bit of data is spread by N=2n bits of the spreading sequence, then the transmitted data rate is NRmin. For a data rate of 2Rmin, a spreading sequence of length N/2=2n-1 will produce the same output rate of NRmin. In general, a code length of 2n-k is needed for a bit rate of 2kRmin. E.H. Dinan and B. Jabbari, Spreading codes for direct sequence CDMA and wideband CDMA cellular networks, IEEE Comm. Mag. 36 (September 1998)

Generation of Spreading Sequences : 

Generation of Spreading Sequences PN Sequences Orthogonal Code Multiple Spreading

Multiple Spreading : 

Multiple Spreading When sufficient bandwidth is available, a multiple spreading techniques can prove highly effective. A typical approach is: Spread the data rate by an orthogonal code to provide mutual orthogonality among all users in the same cell To further spread the result by a PN sequence to provide mutual randomness between users in different cells. In such a two-stage spreading, the orthogonal codes are referred to as channelization codes, and the PN codes are referred to as scrambling codes. Stallings W. Wireless Communications and Networks chapter 10.

Review Questions : 

Review Questions [Review Questions]