Solar Power Mission India

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India embarks on a major solar initiative

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Presentation Transcript

On a Solar Mission: How India is Fast Becoming a Centre of PV Manufacturing : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji On a Solar Mission: How India is Fast Becoming a Centre of PV Manufacturing

Slide 2: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji In an article published in the 6th June issue of New York Times, it is reported that India is working towards becoming a global leader and a hub of solar power, something the developed nations like Germany, Spain and US were recognized for. This is arising out of a draft report called the National Solar Mission which the Government of India is working on. As per the report India plans to add 20000 MW of Solar Power Generation Capacity by 2020. Further the plan envisages 100000 MW by 2030 and 200000 MW by the middle of this century

PV Strategy India : 

PV Strategy India PV industry landscape is going to be characterized by change = Cost is going to drive the industry Leverage rapid execution capability and bandwidth Focus on multiple technology verticals Multiple technologies will co exist for the next 5-10 years Implement technologies of today Low risk Significant room for cost reduction/innovation in existing technologie Industrialize technologies of tomorrow High risk – selective New technologies will have an impact Rapidly build scale Great technologies will die because they don’t get to market fast enough Capitalize the Indian market advantage Control over the eco system Home market advantage

India Developing Solar Market : 

India Developing Solar Market 50MW MNRE scheme — Tariff support up to Rs 15/kWh ( ~$0.30 / kWh) — 10MWs per State and 5 MWs per Project Developer --- More than 2000 MWs of proposals received by Government ‘ Lessons learnt from the feedback to the 50MW scheme in terms of financial viability, Tenure of subsidized tariffs, cheaper funding requirements, capacity, etc. These lessons have ‘changed’ the way Govt perceived Solar and is now very ‘positive’ Solar Mission’ created by the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) — To Announce Policy for 20000MWs in Phase 1 up to 2020, 100000 MWs by 2020, and 200000 MW by 2030

India Developing Solar Market : 

India Developing Solar Market Progress so far — Most of the 50MWs have been allocated to various Project developers — The progress has been slow so far because of some regulatory and procedural issues primarily because this is the first time such a policy has been announced for Solar Forecast — With the ‘Solar Mission’ on the verge of announcing at least a 200000MW policy, it is expected that in the next 3-5 years, all of this will be installed on ground — Apart from that, the States of Rajasthan & Gujarat have announced intentions to install approx 200-300 MWs over the next 1-3 years independent of the central subsidy

India – Focus on Solar EnergyManufacturing : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji India – Focus on Solar EnergyManufacturing India is focusing on solar energy for a major contribution in its energy needs Meanwhile, India's PV manufacturing sector is developing fast. Indian Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh announced : ‘We will pool all our scientific, technical and managerial talents with financial sources to develop solar energy as a source of abundant energy to power our economy and to transform the lives of our people and change the face of India.’ US Marketing Company DCI : India is the second best country after China for business investment. DCI cites India’s labour, including its supply, skills level and cost, as the main reason for this positive perception. In March 2007 the Indian government announced a semiconductor policy under its Special Incentive Package Scheme (SIPS) which will provide 20% of the capital expenditure during the first 10 years for semiconductor industries, including manufacturing activities related to solar PV technology located in Special Economic Zones (SEZ) and 25% for industries not located in an SEZ.

Indian companies step into Solar Energy : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Indian companies step into Solar Energy Andhra Pradesh has set up ‘FabCity’ in the capital, Hyderabad, at an estimated cost of Rs135 billion (US$3.18 billion). Spread over 1200 acres (486 ha), FabCity will house semiconductor manufacturing companies working to meet the needs of the electronic hardware sector and fabrication units for solar PV. Reliance Industries leads the field with the highest volume of investment, for a 5 MW grid-connected solar PV project in West Bengal . Moser Baer Photovoltaic Ltd (MBPVL) has an annual manufacturing capacity of 80 MW for crystalline cells, 50 MW of thin-film modules and 10 MW of concentrator modules. It is aiming for more than 600 MW of thin-film single and tandem junction and 500 MW of crystalline and concentrator modules by 2010. Solar Semiconductors are shipping 15MW of panels fron theoir unit in Hyderabad every month..their inventory is only 10 days.

Slide 8: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Meanwhile, US-based Signet Solar has signed a memorandum of understanding with the government of Tamil Nadu to manufacture 300 MW of thin-film PV modules in a project worth an estimated $500 million. The plant will be located in the Sriperumbudur SEZ. It will initially export most of its production, but will serve the Indian market as domestic demand picks up. The first shipments from the plant are expected in 2010. Signet Solar plans to build three plants (1 GW) in India over the next 10 years at multiple locations. Solar Semiconductor has an order book of $1.5–2 billion to be delivered in the next 2–3 years. It has orders to supply PV modules to leading players in the global solar market including Q Cells AG, IBC Solar and ersol Solar Energy of Germany and Motech Industries of Taiwan

News from manufacturers : 

News from manufacturers Solar Semiconductor’s supply contract with Q-Cells is worth $170 million, for example. The company already has two operating facilities with an installed capacity of 60–70 MW on the outskirts of Hyderabad. According to its director, S. Prasad, it will have the lead in FabCity as the first company to commence manufacturing by the third quarter of 2008. This will be its third unit. ‘By end of 2008, we will have a capacity of 210–220 MW’, said Prasad. Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

News from Manufacturers : 

News from Manufacturers Mola Solaire Produktions GmbH, a manufacturer of multi-crystalline and mono-crystalline solar wafers, has signed a five-year contract to supply 125 MW of multi-crystalline solar wafers to XL Telecom & Energy Ltd between 2008 and 2013. Sharp, the global leader in solar PV technology, recently made a foray into solar energy in India with its Sharp Business Systems India Ltd subsidiary. According to a company spokesman, it will focus its activities on supplying large-scale grid-connected systems and targets 8 MW installed by 2010. Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

News From Manufacturers : 

News From Manufacturers Centrotherm Photovoltaics AG of Germany plans to set up a 5000 tonne capacity (expandable to 10,000 tonnes) polysilicon processing factory at Haldia in the state of West Bengal in Eastern India at an investment of Rs.400 billion ($3.18 billion). This is a joint venture with SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, Environ Energy Deck Services and US-based Perseus. The factory is likely to be the first such plant in India and the state government has already allotted a quarter of the land needed for the 790 acres (320 ha) project. The factory will produce both electronic and solar grade silicon and will be equipped with a 100 MW captive power plant. SREI and Environ Energy together will have a 50% stake in the project, while Centrotherm is likely to pick up a 15% stake in the venture. In addition, the IBM Thomas J Watson Research Centre (the headquarters for IBM Research in the country) has also expressed a desire to participate in solar energy and silicon research in West Bengal. Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

News from Manufacturers : 

News from Manufacturers It is not just foreign interests that are exploring the possibility of expanding solar PV capacities in India. Tata BP Solar, a joint venture between the giant Tata Group of India and BP Solar of the UK (and one of the oldest semiconductor manufacturers in India) is in the advanced stages of a $100 million investment in a 128 MW solar cell manufacturing plant close to its existing facility near Bangalore, which will eventually be scaled up to 180 MW. Tata BP Solar recently announced that it has signed an agreement with Calyon Bank (Credit Agricole CIB) and BNP Paribas to raise $78 million to fund further development. Tata BP Solar currently has a module manufacturing capacity of 85 MW. Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Solar PV Advantage India Most urban and industrial centres in India are experiencing peak electricity shortages of over 15%. India has come up with a plan to develop 60 cities as ‘solar cities.’ The proposal envisages a minimum 10% reduction in total demand of conventional energy after five years in each of these cities through efficiency and renewable energy measures. To keep pace with the global trend of exercising feed-in-tariff solar power, Govt. of India initiates Solar PV projects up to a maximum capacity of 50 MW are to be supported by financial incentives of a maximum of Rs 12/kWh (28 US cents) for PV projects and Rs 10/kWh (24 US cents) for solar thermal power projects for a period of 10 years. With investors rushing to set up solar power projects and adding up to 2500 MW of capacity, the Ministry has asked the Planning Commission and the Indian Cabinet to expand the 11th Plan solar power programme beyond 50 MW. The solar energy industry in India has gained momentum and should be able to keep pace with the government’s aim of achieving 10% of the country’s total electricity requirements by 2012.

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India Solar PV, on the other hand, is a technology that offers a solution for a number of problems associated with fossil fuels. It is clean, decentralized, indigenous and does not need continuous import of a resource. On top of that, India has among the highest solar irradiance in the world which makes solar PV all the more attractive for India. India (Orissa and Andhra Pradesh) also houses some of the best quality reserves of silica (basic feedstock for metal grade Si). India has demonstrated globally proven metallurgical processing capacities and capabilities. India is already an established low cost producer and assembler of solar PV cells and modules

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India To maintain this rate of growth (of around 7-9% per annum), access to cheap, clean and reliable sources of energy has become crucial. India plans capacity to meet its projected demand for electricity of 210 GW by 2012 and to 800 GW by 2032. in which renewable Energy technologies play a crucial role. By 2012, India has targeted 24 GW of capacity through renewable sources of which by 2020 20GW, would be through solar. By 2015, MNRE expects India’s solar capacity to touch 10 GW.

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India The Government of India has kept a target of electrification of all villages By 2009 and ‘Power for all by 2012’ with a minimum energy Consumption of 1 unit per day per family. Solar PV based decentralized distributed generation can contribute to this target **India is one of the fastest growing economies globally and energy is one of the basic requirements to maintain this rate of growth and to serve its developmental objectives.

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India The Government of India in 2007 released a draft model of RE law by mandating electricity utilities to purchase power from renewable sources. The target for electricity generation via this route is fixed at 10% by 2010 and 20% by 2020. Thus far, 13 SERCs have notified RPO targets for their respective states and The remaining states are lined up to fix their purchase obligation. These measures will boost the RE market in the country.

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India In view of the introduction of state-level RPO’s, increasing demand (due to economic growth and rural electrification) and increase in short-term trading prices, SERCs have called for the use of indigenous energy sources, such as RE, especially wind and solar. Currently, as of March 2007, India has RE capacity of 11,275 MW, which is around 7% of the total installed capacity. It has been growing at a CAGR (2003-07) of 18%. The figure below presents the break-up of installed Energy capacity of different segments as on January 2008. By and large, the RE sector is dominated by wind, with a share of around 71% or 7,845 MW of the total renewable capacity

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India India has, in the past three decades, been implementing a large RE program and solar, including solar PV, is a focus area. As a part of the RE program in India, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) launched a country-wide Solar Photovoltaic Program two decades ago. Under this program, almost 1.1 million solar PV based systems have been installed, including 5.85 lakh solar lanterns, 3.64 lakh solar home lighting systems, 69,500 street lighting systems, 7,068 solar water pumps and 2.65 MWp of stand alone and 2.1 MWp grid interactive solar PV power plants.

Solar PV Advantage India : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Advantage India The MNRE’s country-wide solar program has two major focus areas on the Supply Side: (i) Remote village electrification through DDG using RETs, especially solar based applications, and (ii) Promotion of solar technologies in urban, industrial and commercial applications On the demand side, solar energy (thermal and PV) has found application in four main market segments, which have been highlighted in Next Slide.

Benchmarking Countries:India Shines : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Benchmarking Countries:India Shines

Solar PV Indian Scenario Major players and stake holders indian solar : 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Solar PV Indian Scenario Major players and stake holders indian solar

Slide 23: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji Key policy highlights of leading countries

Slide 24: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji The following assumptions have been considered for various analyses:

Our National Initiatives : 

Our National Initiatives Most urban and industrial centres in India are experiencing peak electricity shortages of over 15%. Drawing on similar efforts being implemented in London, Tokyo, New York and Adelaide, the government of India has come up with a plan to develop 60 cities as ‘solar cities.’ The proposal envisages a minimum 10% reduction in total demand of conventional energy after five years in each of these cities through efficiency and renewable energy measures. Solar energy will have a prominent role to play since India, as a tropical country, is blessed with abundant resources. If these solar cities go ahead, India will become a role model for solar cities worldwide. To keep pace with the global trend of exercising feed-in-tariff solar power, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy has produced a set of initiatives aimed at bolstering solar generation. Solar PV projects up to a maximum capacity of 50 MW are to be supported by financial incentives of a maximum of Rs 12/kWh (28 US cents) for PV projects and Rs 10/kWh (24 US cents) for solar thermal power projects for a period of 10 years. With investors rushing to set up solar power projects and adding up to 2500 MW of capacity, the Ministry has asked the Planning Commission and the Indian Cabinet to expand the 11th Plan solar power programme beyond 50 MW. Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

Slide 26: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

PV Solar India Economic Analysis Source: ISA-NMCC 2008 Research and interactions with solar PV manufacturers** Benefits of ‘Energy harvesting’ have not been considered : 

PV Solar India Economic Analysis Source: ISA-NMCC 2008 Research and interactions with solar PV manufacturers** Benefits of ‘Energy harvesting’ have not been considered

Slide 28: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

PV Solar India Economic Analysis : 

PV Solar India Economic Analysis

Slide 30: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

Cost structure of crystalline silicon value chain (in Rupees per Wp) : 

Cost structure of crystalline silicon value chain (in Rupees per Wp)

Slide 32: 

Presented at Solar Economic Forum on Grid Parity PV London 16th to 18th June 2009: Himadri Banerji

Investment required for setting up a 100 MWp vertically integrated poly-crystalline module manufacturing unit (All figures in Rs.Crore) : 

Investment required for setting up a 100 MWp vertically integrated poly-crystalline module manufacturing unit (All figures in Rs.Crore)

Cost structure of thin film modules (in Rs per Wp) : 

Cost structure of thin film modules (in Rs per Wp)

Assumption and profitability parameter for 100MW poly-crystaline unit in 2 different scenarios : 

Assumption and profitability parameter for 100MW poly-crystaline unit in 2 different scenarios

Assumption and profitability parameter for 100MW thin film unit. : 

Assumption and profitability parameter for 100MW thin film unit.

Impact of vertical integration on manufacturer margins (costs in Rs.per Wp) : 

Impact of vertical integration on manufacturer margins (costs in Rs.per Wp)