Intro. to Poetry

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How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Go into a poem using this approach: Understand that a poet writes about things (ideas) that are important to him. Consider the poet a good friend who has come to you to get something off his chest—he doesn’t want you to judge him or give him advice—he just wants you to understand him. As a good friend, you want to make every effort to understand him.

How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Go into a poem using this approach: Understand also that every poem is a mystery—no one is going to understand a poem perfectly through just one reading; and probably no one is every going to understand any poem perfectly ever. Just because you don’t get it the first time through doesn’t mean something’s wrong with you or with the poem.

How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Go into a poem using this approach: Embrace the ambiguity—a poem that reveals itself completely in one or two readings will, over time, seem less of a poem than one that constantly reveals subtle recesses and previously unrecognized meanings—in other words, understand that poems, or parts of poems, will likely be forever mysteries.

How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Go into a poem using this approach: Understand that words (diction) are the building blocks of poetry, and therefore are a major concern when trying to understand what’s going on in a poem. Denotation—dictionary definition Connotation—feel generated by what we associate with the words inquisitive…curious…nosy youthful offender…juvenile delinquent mom…female parent…mother

How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Go into a poem using this approach: Imagine seeing the poet as he speaks as if you’re watching a dramatic monologue, and try to see his facial expressions, his hand movements, the look in his eyes.

How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Homage to My Hips   these hips are big hips.they need space to move around in.they don't fit into littlepetty places. these hipsare free hips.they don't like to be held back.these hips have never been enslaved,they go where they want to go they do what they want to do. these hips are mighty hips.these hips are magic hips.i have known themto put a spell on a man and spin him like a top

How to Read a Poem : 

How to Read a Poem Morning at the Window They are rattling breakfast plates in basement kitchens, And along the trampled edges of the street I am aware of the damp souls of housemaids Sprouting despondently at area gates.  The brown waves of fog toss up to me Twisted faces from the bottom of the street, And tear from a passer-by with muddy skirts An aimless smile that hovers in the air And vanishes along the level of the roofs.

Emily Dickinson : 

Emily Dickinson Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830– May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Dickinson was a prolific private poet, though fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime.

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God.

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2. On a scale from 1 to 10, 1 being “I have absolutely no understanding” and 10 being “I have perfect understanding,” rank your understanding of this poem. No understanding Perfect understanding 3. Jot down three questions whose answers, if you had them, would help you better understand the poem’s meaning. Leave a little space to write answers to your questions. Jot down a quick first impression. What is the poet saying?

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We are going to read the poem a second time. This time, immediately after reading the poem, quickly jot down answers to your own questions in the space you provided beside the questions.

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God.

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5. Rank your understanding of the poem now after your second reading. No understanding Perfect understanding 6. Jot down three more questions whose answers, if you had them, would help you better understand the poem’s meaning. Leave a little space to write answers to your questions. 4. Jot down anything you could add to number 1?

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We are going to read the poem a third time. Like last time, immediately after reading the poem, quickly jot down answers to your own questions in the space you provided beside the questions.

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God.

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8. Rank your understanding of the poem now after your second reading. No understanding Perfect understanding 9. Jot down three more questions whose answers, if you had them, would help you better understand the poem’s meaning. 7. Jot down anything you could add to number 1?

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God.

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. What is the poem’s title? Genre? Author? Year Written or published?

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. Briefly describe what is happening in the poem. State what idea the poem dramatizes: (You might want to wait to respond to this one after you’ve read the poem several times and given yourself a chance to grasp what the poem is doing.)

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. State which three elements from this LitThink template best support or develop its meaning: Who is the speaker? Why is the speaker speaking? What is the speaker doing? Is there an occasion or special event? State the poem’s theme (its meaning, its message):

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. . What is the single most important line or phrase in the poem? What is the poem’s setting? (time/place) Describe specific imagery (visual, tactile, auditory, kinesthetic, gustatory). Give line numbers: What is the tone (attitude) of the speaker? Reverent, serious, sardonic, hostile, detached, whimsical? Which words/phrases contribute to the tone? Give line numbers:

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. Discuss diction (word choice). Point out words that may be ambiguous. Explain which words have strong connotations and explain their effects. Give line numbers. Discuss interesting syntax (word order). Does the order of words in sentences or phrases create any interesting effects (ambiguity, amplification, irony)? Give line numbers.

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Apparently with no Surprise Apparently with no surprise To any happy Flower The Frost beheads it at its play— With accidental power— The blond assassin passes on— The sun proceeds unmoved To measure off another day For an approving God. Discuss figures of speech and other poetic/rhetorical devices (personification, simile, metaphor, oxymoron, repetition, apostrophe, end stop, enjambment, etc.). What effect does the device create? Give line numbers. Discuss any symbols or allegory: Discuss any sound devices (rhyme, alliteration, onomatopoeia, consonance, assonance, rhythm). Give line numbers:

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Emily Dickinson’s “Apparently with no Surprise” dramatizes nature’s power. The theme of the poem is that life is governed by nature, which is an ambivalent force. This force that governs us is all God’s design. The poem’s tone, diction, and symbolism develop the theme. Emily Dickinson’s poem “Apparently with no Surprise” dramatizes nature’s cold, unfeeling power. The poem’s theme is nature’s power and its ambivalence are God’s design, and all things in the universe, including man and all other living things, are subject to this power. This theme is developed through the poems setting, diction, and symbolism.

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Emily Dickinson’s poem “Apparently with no Surprise” dramatizes nature’s cold, unfeeling power. The poem’s theme is nature’s power and its ambivalence are God’s design, and all things in the universe, including man and all other living things, are subject to this power. This theme is developed through the poems tone, diction, and symbolism. The poem is one eight-line stanza. The very length of the poem supports its tone. That speaker sums up nature’s indifference to life and its ambivalence in so brief a space because nature’s power is all consuming and simplistic. It needs no deep analysis. Nature’s gives life and then takes life in an endless cycle without regard to anytig or anyone. It is simply a fact pof life. The word apparently establishes factual nature of the poem from the very bneginning. It is as if the speaker herself is indifferent to the nature cycle of life and death she reports. Apaprently siggest a quiet acceptance with no urgency and also no ceretainty. There is also no urgency in her report that the Flower is beheaded. The matter-of-fact reporting of the incident suggest a quiet acceptance of nature’s power over her.