Basic Tree Felling Safety June 2012

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

Newest & Greatest in Tree Felling Safety

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1: 

MySafetyTrainingOnline.com presents Basic Tree Felling Safety June 2012

What You Will Learn : 

What You Will Learn

Slide 3: 

Part 1. Tree Felling Definitions

Definitions : 

Definitions

Definitions Tree Felling Safety : 

Definitions Tree Felling Safety

Slide 6: 

Part 2 Tree Felling Methods and their Hazards

Slide 7: 

Before you start cutting

Slide 8: 

Before you start cutting

Slide 9: 

A professional cutter can normally look at a stump of a tree and tell how well the basic cutting rules were followed. Before You Cut, Remember

Slide 10: 

It’s like how a crime scene investigator or forensics expert looks at a scene to determine the facts. The same goes with stumps or as the professionals call it, “stump forensics.” Before You Cut Remember Part 2 Since when does a macho lumberjack take advice from a squirrel

Slide 11: 

In order to look at a stump and tell how well it was cut, you first need to know some of the basic mechanics of tree felling. Before You Cut, Remember

Slide 12: 

Part 3. Basic Methods of Successfully & Safely Cutting a Tree

Slide 13: 

3 Basic Parts To Felling Safely Undercut Backcut Holding Wood or Hinge

Three Steps to Cutting Explained : 

Three Steps to Cutting Explained Do not let either cut bypass the apex.

Slide 15: 

Step 2 – Dutchman cut = death One of the most common causes of a Barber Chair is a Dutchman. (“Heavy leaner” is the other major cause.) The BC standard says a shelf over 38th of an inch is unacceptable. Shelf of wood called a “Dutchman”

Slide 16: 

How NOT to Make a Cut This photo shows a “bypass.” The straight cut went way past the apex of the angle. The results of this cut will leave a “Dutchman.” That Little Twerp knows what he talking about.

Slide 17: 

The undercut on this tree was cut too deep and the tree went over backwards No Mate Your Ax is no Ax. Now THIS is An AXE Mate! How NOT to make a Cut – Part 2

Slide 18: 

After the guy made this cut, there was an immediate job opening- HIS!

Slide 19: 

A “Dutchman” acts like a splitting wedge

Slide 20: 

This picture is a “Barber Chair” that could very well be your LAST cut

Slide 21: 

Instead of the tree leaving the front of the stump, part of the tree can come off the back of the stump toward the cutter.

Slide 22: 

A smart, macho guy like me knows what a “Barber Chair” looks like but you may not - So check these out!

Slide 23: 

No undercut has the same effect as an improper undercut. You have no control over where the tree is going to fall and the tree, more likely than not, will barber chair. Note: Any tree over 6 inches in diameter requires an undercut.

Slide 24: 

This stump has no undercut. Notice that there is no hinge wood left on the stump. When a tree is cut like this, there is a high potential for a “Barber Chair.” Remember, a proper undercut is suppose to dictate the direction of fall for the tree.

Making the Right Cut (cont.) : 

Making the Right Cut (cont.) 1/4 to 1/3 tree diameter

Slide 26: 

BACK Cuts When they’re too low, the tree can kick back off the stump. Notice the hinge wood is insufficient and undercut is too deep.

Slide 27: 

Sloping Cuts A Tree can slip off the stump and fall in any direction!!

Slide 28: 

One side of the hinge wood was cut off causing this tree to fall 90o off of it’s intended direction of fall. A fatality resulted from this improper cut.

Basic Tree Felling Safety – Proper Cuts : 

Basic Tree Felling Safety – Proper Cuts

Basic tree felling safety – Improper Cuts : 

Basic tree felling safety – Improper Cuts

Slide 31: 

Anyone can cut down a tree if they cut on it long enough. But doing it SAFELY means following the correct procedures!

Basic Tree Safety – Proper Cuts : 

Basic Tree Safety – Proper Cuts

Slide 33: 

The length of the hinge should be 80% of the diameter of the stump.Example: For a 12-inch diameter tree the hinge should be 9.6 inches long (12 inches ×0.8). Components of a Hinge Cut

Slide 34: 

The width of the hinge should be 10% of the diameter of the tree at stump.Example: For a 12-inch diameter tree the hinge should be 1.2 inches long (12 inches ×0.1). The Hinge Cut Explained

Slide 35: 

The Hinge Cut in Pictures – Using the correct methodology

The Brief History of Stumpology : 

The Brief History of Stumpology Stumps tell the story if the cut was made correctly or NOT!

Slide 37: 

Thanks for Hanging Around From the Gentle Folks of MySafetyTrainingOnline.com

authorStream Live Help