5 mathematical facts we use in our daily life

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

ABOUT 5 MATHEMATICAL FACTS

Comments

Presentation Transcript

MATHEMATICS IN DAILY LIFE:

MATHEMATICS IN DAILY LIFE

INTRODUCTION:

INTRODUCTION What use is maths in everyday life? "Maths is all around us, it's everywhere we go". It's a lyric that could so easily have been sung by Wet Wet Wet . It may not have made it onto the Four Weddings soundtrack, but it certainly would have been profoundly true. Not only does maths underlie every process and pattern that occurs in the world around us, but having a good understanding of it will help enormously in everyday life. Being quick at mental arithmetic will save you pounds in the supermarket, and a knowledge of statistics will help you see through the baloney in television adverts or newspaper articles, and to understand the torrent of information you'll hear about your local football team.

FRACTIONS OF TOMATO:

FRACTIONS OF TOMATO

PowerPoint Presentation:

You can cut all sorts of fruit and vegetables into fractions: cut a tomato in half, an apple into quarters or a banana into eighths, although you would have to be very accurate. An orange might have 20 segments, and each would be a 20th of the whole orange

ROTATIONAL SYMMETRY IN GLOBE:

ROTATIONAL SYMMETRY IN GLOBE

PowerPoint Presentation:

A globe is a good example of rotational symmetry in a three-dimensional object. The globe keeps its shape as it is turned on its stand around an imaginary line between the north and south poles. The globe shown here dates from the late 15th or early 16th century and is one of the earliest three-dimensional representations of the surface of the Earth. It can be found in the Historical Academy in Madrid.

UNDERSTANDING PERCENTAGE:

UNDERSTANDING PERCENTAGE

PowerPoint Presentation:

Using money is a good way of understanding percentages. As there are 100 pence in £1, one hundredth of £1 is therefore 1 pence, meaning that 1 per cent of £1 is 1 pence. From this we can calculate that 50 per cent of £1 is 50 pence. This photograph shows three British currency notes: a £5 note, a £10 note and a £20 note. If 50 pence is 50 per cent of £1, then £5 is 50 per cent of £10, and so £10 is 50 per cent of £20.

SYMMETRY IN TOWER:

SYMMETRY IN TOWER

MATHS HELPING OUR LIVES:

MATHS HELPING OUR LIVES

PowerPoint Presentation:

An article in the Sunday Times in June 2004 revealed the fact that you can't even assume that buying larger bags of exactly the same pasta would work out cheaper. It said that in many of the supermarkets buying in bulk, for example picking up a six-pack of beer rather than six single cans, was in fact more expensive. The newspaper found that the difference can be as much as 30%. The supermarket chains may be exploiting the assumption people have that buying in bulk is cheaper, but if you work it out quickly in your head you'll never be caught out.

GEOMETRY IN CIVIL:

GEOMETRY IN CIVIL This a pictures with some basic geometric structures. This is a modern reconstruction of the English Wigwam. As you can there the door way is a rectangle, and the wooden panels on the side of the house are made up of planes and lines. Except for really planes can go on forever. The panels are also shaped in the shape of squares. The house itself is half a cylinder.

LINES&PLANES:

LINES&PLANES Here is another modern reconstruction if of a English Wigwam. This house is much similar to the one before. It used a rectangle as a doorway, which is marked with the right angles. The house was made with sticks which was straight lines at one point. With the sticks in place they form squares when they intercepts. This English Wigwam is also half a cylinder.

PARALLELOGRAMS:

PARALLELOGRAMS This is a modern day skyscraper at MIT. The openings and windows are all made up of parallelograms. Much of them are rectangles and squares. This is a parallelogram kind of building.

CUBES AND CONES:

CUBES AND CONES This is the Hancock Tower, in Chicago. With this image, we can show you more 3D shapes. As you can see the tower is formed by a large cube. The windows are parallelogram. The other structure is made up of a cone. There is a point at the top where all the sides meet, and There is a base for it also which makes it a cone.

SPHERE AND CUBE:

SPHERE AND CUBE This is another building at MIT. this building is made up of cubes, squares and a sphere. The cube is the main building and the squares are the windows. The doorways are rectangle, like always. On this building There is a structure on the room that is made up of a sphere.

PYRAMIDS:

PYRAMIDS This is the Pyramids, in Indianapolis. The pyramids are made up of pyramids, of course, and squares. There are also many 3D geometric shapes in these pyramids. The building itself is made up of a pyramid, the windows a made up of tinted squares, and the borders of the outside walls and windows are made up of 3D geometric shapes.

RECTANGLES AND CIRCLES:

RECTANGLES AND CIRCLES This is a Chevrolet SSR Roadster Pickup. This car is built with geometry. The wheels and lights are circles, the doors are rectangular prisms, the main area for a person to drive and sit in it a half a sphere with the sides chopped off which makes it 1/4 of a sphere. If a person would look very closely the person would see a lot more shapes in the car. Too many to list.

authorStream Live Help