Aims, Goals, Objectives

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Aims, Goals, Objectives :

Aims, Goals, Objectives Going from big to little Invisible to visible Big ideas to smaller chunks

Sequencing Aims, Goals, Objectives :

Sequencing Aims, Goals, Objectives 1.Aims 1.1Goals 1.1.1Objectives

Aims are broad statements about the intent of education.:

Aims are broad statements about the intent of education.

Goals are statements of educational intention that are more specific than aims :

Goals are statements of educational intention that are more specific than aims

A few things to remember about goals:

A few things to remember about goals Every educational activity should have a goal The goal focuses on what the learner will experience, rather than what the instructor will share or do It is a broad statement of purpose

Clearly written objectives help to define the outcome of the activity.:

Clearly written objectives help to define the outcome of the activity. Writing educational goals and objectives does not have to be a struggle.

The Components of an Educational Objective:

The Components of an Educational Objective

PowerPoint Presentation:

The student will be able to write the formula for sulfuric acid correctly. The student will be able to describe photosynthesis in his or her on words. The student will be able to design a plan for completing a class project. The student will be able to Compare between the renewable and nonrenewable energy The student will be able to Identify the advantages and disadvantages to the renewable energy

PowerPoint Presentation:

The student will be able to Identify the characteristics of living things. The student will be able to Describe the five Leaf Functions The student will be able to Identify the importance of the digestive system. The student will be able to Identify the main organs/body parts involved in the digestive process. The student will be able to Distinguish healthy foods from unhealthy foods.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The student will be able to Explain what is motion The student will be able to Identify the different types of motion The student will be able to Explain what is a force The student will be able to Identify the different types of force The student will be able to Explain the Newton’s Laws of Motion The student will be able to Identify the units of force, energy, velocity, and acceleration

What type of behavior do you want?:

What type of behavior do you want? Behaviors for educational objectives fall into three categories, called domains Think of them as three flavors of ice cream!

Bloom’s Taxonomy:

Bloom’s Taxonomy Three domains of educational activities: Cognitive Domain : involves knowledge and the development of intellectual attitudes and skills Affective Domain : deals with students’ attitudes, values, and emotions Psychomotor Domain : involves physical movement and related skills (Bloom, 1956)

Cognitive Domain:

Cognitive Domain Dealing with intellectual abilities Approximately 80% of educational objectives fall into this domain Most familiar to both instructors, authors and learners “ Head ” objectives

Affective Domain:

Affective Domain Relating to the expression of feelings , including emotions, fears, interests, attitudes, beliefs, values and appreciations Often the most difficult objectives to develop Sometimes called “ heart ” objectives

Psychomotor Domain Motor :

Psychomotor Domain Motor Motor Skills The easiest objectives to write as the behavior is easily observed and monitored. Psychomotor skills often involve the use of tools or instruments. “ Hands On” courses will contain psychomotor objectives “ Hand ” Objectives

Levels of Cognition:

Levels of Cognition Bloom’s Taxonomy Knowledge (verbal recall) Comprehension Application Analysis Synthesis Evaluation Knowledge Evaluation

Cognitive Objectives:

Cognitive Objectives Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis Synthesis Evaluation Simple Complex

Knowledge:

Knowledge The remembering of previously learned material Examples of learning objectives: -know common terms -know specific facts -know methods and procedures -know basic concepts -know principles

Verbs specifying different sorts of outcome (Knowledge):

Verbs specifying different sorts of outcome (Knowledge)

Knowledge (Example):

Knowledge (Example)

Comprehension:

Comprehension The ability to grasp the meaning of material Examples of learning objectives: -understand facts and principles -interpret verbal materials -interpret charts and graphs -translate verbal material to mathematical formulae justify methods and procedures

Comprehension:

Comprehension

Comprehension (Example):

Comprehension (Example)

Application:

Application The ability to use learned material in new and concrete situations Examples of learning objectives: -apply concepts and principles to new situations apply laws and theories to practical situations solve mathematical problems construct graphs and charts demonstrate the correct usage of a method or procedure

Application:

Application

Application (Example):

Application (Example)

Analysis:

Analysis The ability to break down material into its component parts Examples of learning objectives: - recognize unstated assumptions -recognize logical fallacies in reasoning distinguish between facts and inferences evaluate the relevancy of data analyze the organizational structure of a work

Analysis:

Analysis

Analysis (Example):

Analysis (Example)

Analysis (Example):

Analysis (Example)

Synthesis:

Synthesis The ability to put parts together to form a new whole Examples of learning objectives: -write a well organized theme -give a well organize speech write a creative short story propose a plan for an experiment integrate learning from different areas into a plan for solving a problem

Synthesis:

Synthesis

Synthesis (Example):

Synthesis (Example)

Evaluation:

Evaluation The ability to judge the value of material for a given purpose based on definite criteria Examples of learning objectives: - judge the logical consistency of written material -judge the adequacy with which conclusions are supported by data judge the value of a work by the use of internal criteria (organization) or external standards of excellence

Evaluation:

Evaluation

Evaluation (Example):

Evaluation (Example)

Advantages of specifying learning outcomes:

Advantages of specifying learning outcomes Help students learn more effectively. Make it clear what students can hope to gain from a course. Help instructors to design their materials more effectively. Help instructors select the appropriate teaching strategy. Assist in setting examinations based on the materials delivered. Ensure that appropriate assessment strategies are employed.

Learning Outcomes Formula:

Learning Outcomes Formula Verb Or Action Phrase “In Order To” = Great Learning Outcomes What students need to know? “Student identifies, consults and evaluates reference books appropriate to the topic” Why do they need to know this? “locate background information and statistics.” “In Order To” + OR Why? ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005

Learning Outcomes Formula:

Learning Outcomes Formula Verb Or Action Phrase “In Order To” = Great Learning Outcomes What students need to know? “Student identifies, consults and evaluates reference books appropriate to the topic” Why do they need to know this? “locate background information and statistics.” “In Order To” + OR Why? ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005

Characteristics of Good Learning Outcomes:

Characteristics of Good Learning Outcomes Measurable/Assessable Clear to the student & instructor Integrated, developmental, transferable Use discipline-specific competencies/standards as a basis not an end Similar scope and scale “In order to” gets to the uniqueness and real world application of the learning Use a variety of Bloom’s Taxonomy levels ACRL’s IIL Immersion Summer 2005

Example 1:

Example 1 Bad Outcome Students will name the three types of rock in order to differentiate among the three.

Example 1:

Example 1 Good Learning Outcome Students will compare and contrast the characteristics of the three types of rocks in order to differentiate among the three.

Example 2:

Example 2 Bad Learning Outcome Discover that UT Arlington offers a welcoming and helpful environment which can fulfill their educational, cultural and social needs in order to recognize the university’s role in lifelong learning.

Example 3:

Example 3 Bad Outcome Use Illiad and Texshare in order to access materials not available at UT Arlington Library.

Example 3:

Example 3 Good Outcome Utilize retrieval services in order to obtain materials not owned by UT Arlington Library.

Last Example…I Promise:

Last Example…I Promise Bad Outcome Students will construct bibliographies and in-text references using discipline appropriate styles in order to contribute to academic discourse in their discipline.

Last Example…I Promise:

Last Example…I Promise Good Outcome Construct bibliographies and in-text references using discipline appropriate styles in order to correctly attribute others' work and ideas.

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