transgenic crops

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

Transgenic Crops By Sean Merrett and Melissa Slingerland

PowerPoint Presentation:

What are Transgenic Crops? are also known as genetically modified or GM crops A transgenic crop plant contains a gene or genes which have been artificially inserted instead of a plant acquiring them through pollination. The inserted gene sequence (transgene) may come from another unrelated plant, or completely different species. Throughout history all crops have been genetically modified from their original wild state by domestication, selection, and control of breeding over long periods of time. Genetic engineering speeds up the process and increases the variety of genes which can be inserted into a particular plant.

PowerPoint Presentation:

How to make Transgenic Plants An Overview of the Crop Genetic Engineering cycle

PowerPoint Presentation:

Flavr Savr Tomatoes This was the first “genetically modified” food approved by the FDA in 1994. It was eventually pulled off the market in 1997 because of the controversy surrounding it. Questions arose about it’s effects on human health, the environment, potential gene transfer, and the creation of “Frankenfood”.

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Flavr Savr tomato ripens on the vine – resulting in fuller flavour. It is modified so that it remains firm after harvesting. Flavr Savr Traditional Ripe and Increased Flavour. Ripe but decreased Flavour. The traditional tomato is sprayed with ethylene after shipping to induce ripening. The traditional tomato must be harvested while it is still green and firm so that it is not crushed on the way to the supermarket.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Worldwide production area of transgenic crops and traits (source: Science 286:1663, 1999). Crop Area planted in 1999 (millions of acres) Soybean 53.4 Corn 27.4 Cotton 9.1 Canola 8.4 Potato 0.3 Squash 0.3 Papaya 0.3 Trait Herbicide tolerance 69.4 Bt insect resistance 22.0 Bt + herbicide tolerance 7.2 Virus resistance 0.3 World Use of Transgenic Crops

PowerPoint Presentation:

As of 2003, the Canadian government has approved over 60 genetically modified foods for sale in Canada. Some of these include: insect resistant corn herbicide tolerant soybean, sugarbeet, corn, and rice virus resistant squash insect and virus resistant potato How many genetically modified foods are approved in Canada?

PowerPoint Presentation:

Technology Protection System, also known as the “terminator”, incorporates a trait that kills developing plant embryo’s so seeds cannot be saved and replanted in subsequent years “Traitor”, also known as Trait-specific Genetic Use Restriction Technology incorporates a control mechanism that requires yearly applications of a propriety chemical to activate desirable traits in the crop the farmer can save and replant seeds but cannot gain the benefits of the controlled traits unless he pays for the activating chemical each year Control Mechanisms used by Seed Companies

PowerPoint Presentation:

A "pro" Biotechnology Perspective improved nutritional quality increased crop yield insect resistance disease resistance herbicide resistance salt tolerance biopharmaceuticals saving valuable topsoil ability to grow plants in harsh environments Weed-infested soybean plot (left) and Roundup Ready® soybeans after Roundup treatment. Source: Monsanto

PowerPoint Presentation:

A "con" Biotechnology Perspective Damage to human health allergies horizontal transfer and antibiotic resistance eating foreign DNA changed nutrient levels Damage to the natural environment crop-to-weed gene flow leakage of GM proteins into soil reductions in pesticide spraying: are they real? Disruption of current practices of farming and food production in developed countries crop-to-crop gene flow Disruption of traditional practices and economies in less developed countries Lack of research on consequences of transgenic crops

PowerPoint Presentation:

disruption of natural ecosystems introduction of diseases creation of biological weapons ethical dilemmas ie. Could human genes be inserted into new crops? "Cons" continued

PowerPoint Presentation:

References http://dragon.zoo.utoronto.ca/~jlm-gmf/T0501D/introduction.html http://www.colostate.edu/programs/lifesciences/TransgenicCrops/animation.html# http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/T/TransgenicPlants.html#Terminator_Genes http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=www.carascissoria.com/images/poli/frankenfood.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www. carascissoria.com/general/singles/6173.htm&h=310&w=234&sz=33&tbnid=4aYYWnTCTGMJ:&tbnh=111&tbnw= 84&start=2&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dfrankenfood%2Bpictures%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26sa% 3DN http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/sci/biotech/safsal/gmoogme.shtml http://www.greenpeace.ca/e/campaign/gmo/backgrnd/index.php Whitney, E.N. and Rolfes, S.R. (2002). Understanding Nutrition (9 th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Questions??

authorStream Live Help