Ethics and Etiquette

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CHAPTER 5:

07/16/06 1 CHAPTER 5 Ethics and Etiquette

The Right Treatment of Others:

07/16/06 2 The Right Treatment of Others * Ethics — a set of moral principles of right conduct. Etiquette — correct behavior and practices according to social convention. * Morality — the goodness or badness of human action or behavior.

Ethics Gap:

07/16/06 3 Ethics Gap CEO salaries. Managers looking inward. The rise of teams. The age of the share price. Stock options. Impact of baby boomers aging.

Individuals and Ethics:

07/16/06 4 Individuals and Ethics You might be faced with ethical dilemmas involving your income or career. Your boss might ask you to do something unethical or even illegal. What are your choices? Remember, organizations are not ethical or unethical, individuals are, and you can choose which you want to be.

Ethics:

07/16/06 5 Ethics Trustee-of-profit — a corporation’s sole responsibility is to produce profits, and any expenditure on social goals amounts to a hidden tax. Enlightened self-interest — social goals are one of the overall goals of management. cont.

Ethics:

07/16/06 6 Ethics * What is a company’s social responsibility to: Creditors Employees Consumers The environment cont.

Ethics:

Ethics * Social Accountability The belief that companies are corporate citizens and have a responsibility toward society 07/16/06 7

Ethics:

07/16/06 8 Ethics What is a company’s social responsibility to: Provide information? Assist special interest groups? Help small businesses?

Ethics Guidelines:

07/16/06 9 Ethics Guidelines Management must be committed. Ethics must be integrated into regular operations. Ethics program must be communicated. Ethics program must be credible. Participants must be concerned with action.

Etiquette:

07/16/06 10 Etiquette Etiquette — correct behavior and practices according to social convention. Often not formally addressed. Often critical to your success. Nonconformance to standards of etiquette may cost you a job, a sale, a deal, or a promotion. cont.

Etiquette:

07/16/06 11 Etiquette Telephone : Answer in three rings or less. State your name. Return calls in 24–48 hours. When calling, ask if people have time to talk. Caller returns disconnected call. cont.

Etiquette:

07/16/06 12 Etiquette Cellular phones: Consider the cost. Limit use. Be brief. Restrict calls to clients and company business. Make calls in private. cont.

Etiquette:

07/16/06 13 Etiquette * Copiers: Smaller jobs go first. Interrupt large jobs for small (unless a special set-up is needed). Reset to normal. Fill paper, toner. cont.

Etiquette:

07/16/06 14 Etiquette E-mail: Use an attachment for long messages. Don’t send secrets. Don’t use all caps or abbreviations. Don’t overuse or send all high priority. Use return receipts. cont.

Meeting Etiquette:

07/16/06 15 Meeting Etiquette Attending a meeting: Arrive on time and prepared. If late, just apologize. * Calling a meeting: Is it needed? Create an agenda. cont.

Meeting Etiquette:

07/16/06 16 Meeting Etiquette Set date, time, location, and purpose. Determine number to attend. Obtain adequate facilities and equipment. cont.

Meeting Etiquette:

07/16/06 17 Meeting Etiquette Arrive early. Review arrangements. Start and end on time. * If meeting is longer then 90 Min include a break Ensure that all participate. Keep records. Distribute minutes.

Attire and Grooming:

07/16/06 18 Attire and Grooming You only have one chance to make a first impression. Attire and grooming are important during and after the first impression. Conservative dress is often best at first; casual can come later, if it’s acceptable. All clothes should fit, be coordinated, and be well-maintained.

Attire for Men:

07/16/06 19 Attire for Men Suits are still proper for business , especially for managers and aspiring managers. Suits are typically gray or blue; stripes are acceptable. Striped shirts and ties are O.K., but only two of the three (suit, shirt, tie) can be striped and worn together. Suits — wool; shirt — cotton; ties — silk. cont.

Attire for Men:

07/16/06 20 Attire for Men Shirts are always long-sleeved. Ties can make or break the suit. All leathers should match — shoes and belts or braces (suspenders). Sock color should match pant color. Shoes should be black. Belt buckles should be simple.

Attire for Women:

07/16/06 21 Attire for Women Dress conservatively until familiar with what top management wears. Begin with the basic skirted business suits. The skirt should reach just at or below the knee. No vest is needed, a scarf is optional, and ties should be avoided. cont.

Attire for Women:

07/16/06 22 Attire for Women Suits should be wool or linen. Solids, tweeds, and plaids are acceptable. Avoid pinstripes, at least initially. Most colors are O.K. for women. Most conservative are medium and dark gray; medium and navy blue; deep maroon; and camel. The blouse should be simple. cont.

Attire for Women:

07/16/06 23 Attire for Women The blouse can be cotton or silk, a solid color, but most colors are O.K. Shoes should be blue, black, deep brown, or gray pumps. Hose should be neutral or skin-tone. Makeup subtle; jewelry and perfume light. An attaché rather than a handbag.

Casual Attire:

07/16/06 24 Casual Attire This is not necessarily a blessing. What you wear will still be scrutinized. For this you now need “business casual.” Start with sport coats or a sweater and slacks. Avoid blue jeans, at least initially. Avoid sweats, shorts, and spandex.

Grooming:

07/16/06 25 Grooming Begins with cleanliness and moderation . Hair — neat, trimmed, organized, clean, and away from the face. Glasses — clean, fit properly, no leashes. Teeth clean, breath fresh. Fingernails — clean and trimmed. Avoid trends in hairstyles and makeup.

Coming and Going:

07/16/06 26 Coming and Going Whoever gets to a door first opens it for others, except: Younger people open doors for those significantly older. Customers or clients never open doors. Hold doors for those needing help . cont.

Introductions:

07/16/06 27 Introductions Introduce the person of highest rank first . If equals, introduce younger people to older people . Stand during introductions; always shake hands . Never guess at someone’s name.

Dining:

07/16/06 28 Dining Can create tension in the unprepared. In business dining, business comes first and food second. Give everyone time to read the menu. cont.

Dining:

07/16/06 29 Dining To show you are ready to order, close your menu. Talk business after everyone has placed an order. Order foods that will not interfere with talking business. cont.

Dining:

07/16/06 30 Dining Guests should not order the most expensive items unless invited to by the host. Guests should not order a first course unless others do. Wait to order alcohol until the host does. If alcohol is served, have only one or two drinks. Do not drink when trying to close a sale or deal. cont.

Dining:

07/16/06 31 Dining If at a buffet, do not pile your plate. Use silverware for virtually everything. Start with the utensils on the outside and work your way in. If you drop silverware, leave it and ask for a replacement. Learn to use utensils properly (see text). Don’t speak so loud that other tables hear your business. cont.

Dining:

07/16/06 32 Dining The person issuing the invitation pays the bill. The host should allow the guest to order first, signaling to the wait staff who is host and who will pay. The host may suggest items that “look good,” giving the guest an idea of the proper price range. The host begins to eat first. The host orders dessert first, if at all. cont.

Dining:

07/16/06 33 Dining Do not: Place your elbows on the table. Eat until all are served. Send food back. Do say please and thank you often. If you must leave, place your napkin on your chair. Signal that you are finished by placing your knife and fork diagonally on your plate.

Cordiality:

07/16/06 34 Cordiality * Thank-you notes can be just a thank you, or they can be a thank you with a business message. Send them: When you have received a gift. After special lunches or dinners. To recognize a special favor. After closing the first sale or for a large sale. cont.

Cordiality:

07/16/06 35 Cordiality Christmas/holiday party etiquette: Limit your drinking. Don't try to be the life of the party. Don’t flirt. Don’t divulge secrets or violate confidences. Remember your position and status, or lack thereof. Don’t discuss work — it’s a party.

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