Basic Life Support

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Presentation Transcript

BASIC LIFE SUPPORT : 

CPR 1 BASIC LIFE SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS: BARRETT, BULL, CHARETTE, EISENBART, FORD, GANT, MCGOWEN, STENSRUD, VASQUEZ REFERENCES: AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION GUIDELINES FOR CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION AND EMERGENCY CARIDAC CARE INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL: BASIC LIFE SUPPORTHEALTHCARE PROVIDER MANUAL

COURSE OBJECTIVES : 

CPR 2 COURSE OBJECTIVES PROVIDE BACKGROUND INFORMATION LEARN SKILLS NECESSARY TO PERFORM BLS (AHA STANDARDS). UPON COMPLETION OF THE COURSE UNDERSTAND BACKGROUND INFO DEMONSTRATE COMPETENCY IN PSYCHOMOTOR BLS TECHNIQUES SCORE AT LEAST 84% ON WRITTEN EXAM (50 QUESTIONS)

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION : 

CPR 3 AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION SETS EMERGENCY CARDIAC CARE STATNDARDS AND GUIDELINES DEVELOPS AND DISTRIBUTES MATERIALS DEVELOPS COMMUNITY RESOURCES

MILITARY TRAINING NETWORK : 

CPR 4 MILITARY TRAINING NETWORK NETWORK OF INSTALLATIONS PROVIDING INSTRUCTION ADMINISTERED FROM USUHS IN BETHESDA, MD COORDINATES TRAINING STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES BEWTEEN PROPONENTS AND SITES MEDICAL COMPANY TRAINING SITE, FORT INDIANTOWN GAP, PA

REGISTRATIONVSCERTIFICATION : 

CPR 5 REGISTRATIONVSCERTIFICATION THE WORD CERTIFICATION WILL NOT BE USED TO IMPLY SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF AHA PROGRAMS COURSE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE CONSIDERED “REGISTERED”

LIABILITY STATEMENT : 

CPR 6 LIABILITY STATEMENT COURSE INCLUDES PHYSICAL EXERTION, PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS AND POSSIBILITY OF CROSS-INFECTION. IF YOU’VE RECENTLY HAD ANY TYPE OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE, TO INCLUDE UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION OR OPEN SORES ON YOUR MOUTH OR HANDS, IT’S IMPERATIVE THAT YOU DERFER MANNEQUIN PRACTICE UNTIL YOU ARE WELL.

INFECTION CONTROL/MANNEQUIN DECONTAMINATION : 

CPR 7 INFECTION CONTROL/MANNEQUIN DECONTAMINATION RISK FACTORS PRECAUTIONS RESPONSIBILITY

RISK FACTORSHIV : 

CPR 8 RISK FACTORSHIV THE RETROVIRAL AGENT KNOWN AS HIV IS COMPARATIVELY DELECATE AND INACTIVATED IN LESS THAN 10 MIN AT ROOM TEMP BY A NUMBER OF CHEMICALS, INCLUDING THE AGENT RECOMMENDED FOR MANNEQUIN DECONTAMINATION. SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE (BLEACH).

RISK FACTORSDISEASE TRANSMISION : 

CPR 9 RISK FACTORSDISEASE TRANSMISION OF THE ESTIMATED 40 MIL IN THE U.S. AND PERHAPS 150 MIL WORLDWIDE THAT HAVE BEEN TAUGHT MOUTH-TO-MOUTH RESCUE BREATHING ON MANNEQUINS IN THE LAST 25 YEARS, THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A DOCUMENTED CASE OF TRANSMISSION OF BACTERIAL, FUNGAL OR VIRAL DISEASE BY A CPR TRAINING MANNEQUIN.

PRECAUTIONS : 

CPR 10 PRECAUTIONS USE DISPOSABLE FACE SHIELDS PAIR INDIVIDUALS FOR PRACTICE ENSURE THAT A THOROUGH HAND WASH IS ALWAYS PERFORMED ENSURE THAT IN 2-PERSON CPR, SECOND PERSON SIMULATES THE BREATHING ENSURE SIMULATION OF FINGER SWEEP ENSURE PROPER DECONTAMINATION BETWEEN STUDENTS

RESPONSIBILITY - WHO’S IS IT? : 

CPR 11 RESPONSIBILITY - WHO’S IS IT? EVERYONE PARTICIPATING IN A CPR COURSE IS RESPONSIBLE TO ENSURE THAT INFECTION CONTROL/DEONTAMINATION IS FOLLOWED TO INCLUDE: PROGRAM/CSE ADMINISTRATORS BLS INSTRUCTORS BLS CSE PARTICIPANTS

WHY SHOULD I LEARN CPR? : 

CPR 12 WHY SHOULD I LEARN CPR? SOMEONE YOU LOVE, KNOW OR WORK WITH HAS HEART DISEASE CAN PREVENT A DEATH OR DISABILITY TO BE A BETTER MEMBER OF COMMUNITY JOB REQUIRES IT

GOOD SAMARITAN LAW : 

CPR 13 GOOD SAMARITAN LAW LIMITATION ON LIABILITY FOR MEDICAL CARE OR ASSISTANCE IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS ANY PERSON WHO IN GOOD FAITH RENDERS EMER CARE OR ASSITANCE TO AN INJURED PERSON AT THE SCENE OF AN ACCIDENT OR OTHER EMER, OUTSIDE OF A HOSPITAL, WITHOUT EXPECTATION OF RECEIVING OR INTENDING TO SEEK COMPENSATION FROM SUCH INJURED PERSON FOR SUCH SERVICE, SHALL NOT BE LIABLE IN CIVIL DAMAGES FOR ANY ACT OR OMISSION, NOT SONSTITUTING GROSS NEGLIGENCE, IN THE COURSE OF RENDERING SUCH CARE OR ASSISTANCE

MEDICAL-LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS : 

CPR 14 MEDICAL-LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS REASONS TO WITHHOLD CPR DEATH - DECAPITATION, RIGOR MORTIS, TISSUE DECOMPOSITION, EXTREME DEPENDENT LIVIDITY DOA - RESUSCITATE IRREVERSIBLE BRAIN DAMAGE - RESUSCITATE Pt REFUSAL - “COMPETENT” REFUSAL DNR - PHYSICIAN ORDERS - HAVE COPY

WITHDRAWAL OF CPR : 

CPR 15 WITHDRAWAL OF CPR NON-PHYSICIAN WHO INITIATES BLS SHOULD CONTINUE UNTIL ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OCCURS: RESTORATION OF CIRCULATION AND VENTILATION BLS QUALIFIED INDIVIDUAL TAKES OVER CPR A PHYSICIAN ASSUMES CARE TRANSFER OF VICTIM TO EMS TRAINED PERSONNEL RESCUER IS EXHAUSTED AND CANNOT CONTINUE

CHAIN OF SURVIVAL : 

CPR 16 CHAIN OF SURVIVAL CPR ALONE IS NOT ENOUGH TO SAVE LIVES CPR IS A VITAL LINK IN THE CHAIN OF SURVIVAL THAT MUST BE INITIATED UNTIL MORE ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT IS AVAILABLE

CHAIN OF SURVIVAL : 

CPR 17 CHAIN OF SURVIVAL PREVENTION - NOT PART OF CHAIN CHAIN SEQUENCE 1. EARLY ACCESS 2. EARLY CPR 3. EARLY DEFIBRILLATION 4. EARLY ADVANCED CARE

EARLY ACCESS : 

CPR 18 EARLY ACCESS EARLY ACTIVATION OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) SYSTEM “CALL 911” WHEN YOU CALL, GIVE THE FOLLOWING INFO; AND HANG UP LAST LOCATION - ADDRESS, LANDMARKS, ROADS NUMBER OF PHONE YOUR USING DESCRIBE WHAT HAPPENED NUMBER OF VICTIMS WHAT IS BEING DONE FOR VICTIMS ADULTS - PHONE FIRST CHILDREN/INFANTS - PHONE FAST

EARLY CPR : 

CPR 19 EARLY CPR WHEN AND HOW TO PROVIDE RESCUE BREATHING THAT WILL DELIVER AIR TO THE LUNGS OF A VICTIM SUFFERING FROM RESPIRATORY ARREST WHEN AND HOW TO PROVIDE CHEST COMPRESSIONS THAT WILL CIRCULATE THE BLOOD OF VICTIM SUFFERING FROM CARDIAC

EARLY DEFIBRILLATION : 

CPR 20 EARLY DEFIBRILLATION ELECTRIC IMPULSE TO ESTABLISH A NORMAL HEART RHYTHM - CONVERT VENTRICALUAR FIBRILLATION WHICH PREVENTS THE HEART FROM PUMPING BLOOD

EARLY ADVANCED CARE : 

CPR 21 EARLY ADVANCED CARE CARE WHICH CONTINUES BLS MORE SPECIALIZED CARE BY EMS PROFESSIONALS OXYGEN THERAPY/IV LINE ESTAB CARDIAC DRUGS CLOT BUSTERS ANTICOAGULANTS

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGYOF THE HEART : 

CPR 22 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGYOF THE HEART THE HEART IS A MUSCLE ABOUT THE SIZE OF A CLENCHED FIST LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE CHEST BEHIND THE BREASTBONE (STERNUM) AND IN FRONT OF THE SPINE

A & POF THE HEART : 

CPR 23 A & POF THE HEART THE HEART IS A DOUBLE SIDED PUMP THE LEFT PUMPS OXYGENATED BLOOD TO ALL PARTS OF THE BODY - ITSELF FIRST VIA THE CORANARY ARTERIES THE RIGHT SIDE PUMPS OXYGEN POOR BLOOD TO THE LUNGS WHERE CARBON DIOXIDE IS REMOVED AND OXYGEN PICKED UP AT REST AN ADULT HEART PUMPS APPROX 5 LITERS OF BLOOD/MIN WHEN EXERCISING AS MUCH AS 25 LETERS

A & POF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM : 

CPR 24 A & POF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM RESPIRATORY SYSTEM UPPER - ABOVE THE LARYNX NOSE, MOUTH, THROAT LOWER LARYNX, TRACHEA, BRONCHI, AVEOLI

A & POF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM : 

CPR 25 A & POF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM REMOVE CARBON DIOXIDE SUPPLY THE BODY WITH OXYGEN INHALED AIR 21% OXYGEN EXHALED AIR 16% OXYGEN WITHOUT OXYGEN 1 MIN - HEART IRRITABILITY 4-6 MIN - BRAIN DAMAGE LIKELY 6-10 MIN - BRAIN DAMAGE VERY LIKELY 10+ MIN - IRREVERSIBLE BRAIN DAMAGE

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE : 

CPR 26 CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE ATHEROSCLEROSIS PROGRESSIVE NARROWING OF ARTERIES STARTS AT AN EARLY AGE DEPOSITS OF FATS (CHOLESTEROL) AND EVENTUALLY CALCIUM IN WALLS OF ARTERIES REDUCES FLOW OF BLOOD

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE : 

CPR 27 CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE SHOWS UP IN THREE WAYS: ANGINA PECTORIS HEART ATTACK SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE : 

CPR 28 CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE ANGINA TEMPORARY (2-15 MIN) CHEST PRESSURE OR PAIN THAT IS RELIEVED BY REST OR NITROGLYCERIN. OCCURS WHEN NARROWING OF THE CORONARY ARTERY TEMPORARILY PREVENTS AN ADEQUATE SUPPLY OF BLOOD & OXYGEN TO MEET THE DEMANDS OF THE WORKING HEART - HEART MUSCLE IS UNDAMAGED

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE : 

CPR 29 CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE HEART ATTACK AKA - CORONARY, ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, CORONARY THROMBOSIS OCCURS WHEN A BLOOD CLOT SUDDENLY AND COMPLETELY BLOCKS THE ARTERY, RESULTING IN THE DEATH OF HEART MUSCLE CELLS SUPPLIED BY THAT ARTERY

ACTION FOR SURVIVAL : 

CPR 30 ACTION FOR SURVIVAL MORE THAN HALF OF ALL HEART ATTACK VICTIMS DIE OUTSIDE OF THE HOSPITAL, MOST WITHIN 2 HOURS OF THE INITIAL SYMPTOMS. IT IS ESSENTIAL TO KNOW & BE ABLE TO RECOGNIZE THE SIGNALS OF A HEART ATTACK & TAKE APPROPRIATE ACTION.

HEART ATTACK SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS : 

CPR 31 HEART ATTACK SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS SIGNALS CHEST DISCOMFORT MOST COMMON SIGN PRESSURE, FULLNESS, SQUEEZING OR PAIN CENTER OF CHEST BEHIND BREASTBONE, SOMETIMES SPREADS TO EITHER NECK, SHOULDER, JAW OR EITHER ARM LASTS LONGER THAN A FEW MINUTES, MAY COME AND GO OTHER SIGNS - LIGHTHEADEDNESS, FAINTING, SWEATING, NAUSEA, SOB

RECOGNIZE A HEART ATTACK : 

CPR 32 RECOGNIZE A HEART ATTACK IF KNOWN CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE AT ONSET OF SYMPTOMS STOP ALL ACTIVITY - REST & RELAX HELP WITH NITRO ADMIN 3 TAB MAX AT 3-5 MIN INTERVALS IF SYMPTOMS LAST ACTIVATE EMS

RECOGNIZE A HEART ATTACK : 

CPR 33 RECOGNIZE A HEART ATTACK WITHOUT KNOWN CORONARY ARTERS DISEASE AT ONSET OF SYMPTOMS HAVE VICTIM REST QUIETLY/CALMLY IF SYMPTOMS LAST LONGER THAT A FEW MINUTES ACTIVATE EMS PUT IN COMFORABLE POSITION TO MAKE BREATHING EASIER MONITOR

IMPORTANCE OF PROMPT EMS DURING FIRST SYMPTOM HOUR : 

CPR 34 IMPORTANCE OF PROMPT EMS DURING FIRST SYMPTOM HOUR DIRECTLY RELATES TO CHAIN OF SURVIVAL V-FIB VERY COMMON BLOOD CLOT DISSOLVING DRUGS SHOULD BE GIVEN ASAP AVERAGE DELAY BETWEEN ONSET OF SYMPTOMS AND DECISION TO SEEK MED HELP IS 2-3 HOURS

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE : 

CPR 35 CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST HEARTBEAT AND BREATHING STOP ABRUPTLY MAY BE INITIAL AND ONLY MANIFESTATION OF CAD OR HEART ATTACK IF CIRCULATION IS NOT RESTORED BRAIN DAMAGE BEGINS WITHIN 4-6 MIN 10+ MIN BRAIN DEATH CERTAIN MOST COMMONLY OCCURS WITHIN 1 TO 2 HOURS AFTRER THE ONSET OF SYMPTOMS

SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST : 

CPR 36 SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST CAUSES PRIMARILY CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE ANY CONDITION THAT INTERFERES WITH THE DELIVERY OF OXYGEN OR BLOOD TO THE HEART IRRITATION OF HEART MUSCLE PRIMARY RESPIRATORY ARREST DIRECT INJURY TO THE HEART DRUGS DISTURBANCES IN HEART RHYTHM

CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE : 

CPR 37 CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE THE KEY TO IMPROVED OUTCOME FOR THE VICTIM IS THE BYSTANDER WHO RECOGNIZES THE EMERGENCY AND INITIATES THE CHAIN OF SURVIVAL WHICH INCREASES THE CHANCE OF SURVIVAL GREATLY

INCREASED SURVIVABILITY : 

CPR 38 INCREASED SURVIVABILITY IN CPR IS STARTED WITHIN THE FIRST 4 MINS AND DEFIBREILLATION WITHIN 8, CHANCES FOR SURVIVAL ARE INCREASED TO AS MUCH AS 47%

RISK FACTORS : 

CPR 39 RISK FACTORS RISK FACTORS INCREASE THE CHANCES OF HAVING A HEART ATTACK COME CAN BE CHANGED OR CONTROLLED AND OTHER CAN’T THE MORE RISK FACTORS ONE HAS THE GREATER THE DANGER OF A HEART ATTACK

RISK FACTORS : 

CPR 40 RISK FACTORS AVERAGE RISK = 100 NONE 77 CIGARETTS 120 COGARETTS & CHOLESTEROL 236 CIGARETTS, CHOLESTEROL 384AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

RISK FACTORSTHAT CANNOT BE CHANGED : 

CPR 41 RISK FACTORSTHAT CANNOT BE CHANGED GENDER MALES TO FEMALE RATIO IS PRESENTLY 60:40 HEREDITY FAMILY HISTORY AGE INCREASED LIFE SPAN - GREATER RISK

RISK FACTORSTHAT CAN BE CHANGED : 

CPR 42 RISK FACTORSTHAT CAN BE CHANGED CIGARETTE SMOKING HIGHBLOOD PRESSURE(HYPERTENSION) BLOOD CHOLESTEROL LEVELS PHYSICAL INACTIVITY (EXERCISE)

CONTRIBUTING RISK FACTORS : 

CPR 43 CONTRIBUTING RISK FACTORS DIABETES ELEVATED BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS CAN BE CONTROLLED, BUT THE INCREASED RISK FOR HEART ATTACK CAN’T BE ELIMINATED OBESITY STRESS MAY BE A MAJOR CONTROLLABLE RISK FACTOR

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 44 PRUDENT HEART LIVING A LIFESTYLE THAT MAY MINIMIZE THE RISK OF FUTURE HEART DISEASE REDUCING RISK FACTORS MAY REDUCE THE RISK OF HAVING A HEART ATTACK OR STROKE GOOD GENERAL HEALTH AND FITNESS

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 45 PRUDENT HEART LIVING THERE ARE FIVE SPECIFIC WAYS TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN A PRUDENT HEART LIVING STYLE: DON’T SMOKE CONTROL HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE REDUCE FAT & CHOLESTEROL EXERCISE WEIGHT CONTROL

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 46 PRUDENT HEART LIVING SMOKERS HAVE A GREATER RISK OF DYING FROM A VARIETY OF DISEASES THAN NONSMOKERS: TWICE THE RISK OF A HEART ATTACK TOW TO FOUR TIMES THE RISK OF SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH THE EARLIER THE USE OF TOBACCO THE GREATER THE RISK TO FUTURE HEALTH

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 47 PRUDENT HEART LIVING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE CONSISTENTLY 140/90 UNDERLYING CAUSE STILL UNKNOWN CONTROLLED BY CHANGES IN DIET INCREASED EXERCISE DRUGS - ONCE STATED CAN’T BE STOPPED

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 48 PRUDENT HEART LIVING SATURATED FAT - IN THE FOODS WE EAT (ANIMAL PRODUCTS) ORGAN MEATS, EGG YOLKS CHOLESTEROL - MANUFACTURED BY OUR BODIES - DEPOSITED IN ARTERIES ATHEROSCLEROSIS - FATTY PLAQUE DEPOSITS SATURATED FAT RAISES BLOOD CHOLESTEROL RED MEAT, BUTTER, CHEESE, CREAM AND WHOLE MILK SUBSTITUTE POLUNSATURATED FATS LIQUID VEGETABLE OILS

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 49 PRUDENT HEART LIVING EXERCISES REGUARLY TONES THE MUSCLES STIMULATES CIRCULATION HELPS PREVENT EXCESS WEIGHT PROMOTES FEELING OF WELL BEING SURVIVAL RATE OF HEART ATTACK VICTIMS IS HIGHER

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 50 PRUDENT HEART LIVING WEIGHT CONTROL ADULT WEIGHT REACHED AGE 21-25 NEED FEWER CALORIES AS WE AGE WITHOUT ACTIVITY EXCESS CALORIES ARE STORED - ADIPOSE TISSUE INCREASED LIFE EXPECTANCY AT IDEAL WEIGHT OBESITY INCREASES RISK FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, CHOLESTEROL AND DIABETES AND INACTIVITY

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 51 PRUDENT HEART LIVING DIABETES UNTREATED IS A MAJOR HEALTH PROBLEM, MAY RESULT IN DAMAGE TO BLOOD VESSELS IN THE HEART KIDNETS AND OTHER ORGANS UNCONTROLLED ASSOCIATED WITH A GREATER RISK OF HEART ATTACK

PRUDENT HEART LIVING : 

CPR 52 PRUDENT HEART LIVING STRESS BOTH EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL PERSONAL TOLERANCE LEVELS SHOULD BE KNOWN AND NOT EXCEEDED

STROKE : 

CPR 53 STROKE RESULT OF A BLOCKAGE OR RUPTURE OF A BLOOD VESSEL. MAY REQUIRE RESCUE BREATHING, CHEST COMPRESSIONS OR BOTH OCCURS IN PEOPLE OF ALL AGES MOST COMMON IN AGES A LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH AND DISABILITY

STROKE : 

CPR 54 STROKE WARNING SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS SUDDEN WEAKNESS OR NUMBNESS OF FACE, ARM OR LEG ON ONE SIDE OF BODY SPEECH SLURRED OR INCOHERENT UNEXPLAINED DIZZINESS, UNSTEADINESS OR SUDDEN FALLS DIMNESS OR LOSS OF BISION USUALLY IN ONE EYE SUDDEN WORSE HEADACHE OF THEIR LIFE

STROKE : 

CPR 55 STROKE TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK (TIA) CAUSED BY BLOCKED BLOOD VESSEL OR EMBOLISM SYMPTOMS LAST LESS THAN 24 HOURS SEEK MEDICAL HELP IMMEDIATELY TREATMENT CAN PREVENT STROKE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT LINKED TO EARLY RECOGNITION ACTIVATION OF EMS RAPID TRANSPORT

STROKE : 

CPR 56 STROKE FUNDAMENTALS OF BLS IMPORTANT FOR STROKE VICTIMS ESPECIALLY WHEN CONSCIOUSNESS IS IMPAIRED ACTIVATE EMS AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION CAN OCCUR OPEN AIRWAY AND PERFORM RESCUE BREATHING

STROKE : 

CPR 57 STROKE RISK FACTORS THAN CANNOT BE CHANGED AGE GENDER RACE DIABETES MELLITUS PRIOR STROKE HEREDITY ASYMPTOMATIC CAROTID BRUIT

STROKE : 

CPR 58 STROKE RISK FACTORS THAT CAN BE CONTROLLED HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE HEART DISEASE SIGARETTE SMOKING HIGH RED BLOOD CELL COUNT TIA’S

STROKE : 

CPR 59 STROKE CINCINNATI HOSPITAL STROKE SCALE FACIAL DROOP HAVE Pt SMILE OR SHOW TEETH BOTH SIDES MOVE EQUALLY WELL MOTOR WEAKNESS Pt CLOSES EYES AND HOLDS BOTH ARMS OUT BOTH ARMS MOVE TOGETHER WITHOUT DRIFT SPEECH HAVE Pt SAY “YOU CAN’T TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS” CAN SAY UNSING CORRECT WORDS WITHOUT SLURRING

FOREIGN BODYAIRWAYOBSTRUCTION(FBAO) : 

CPR 60 FOREIGN BODYAIRWAYOBSTRUCTION(FBAO) FBAO OR CHOKING CAUSES APPROXIMATELY 3800 DEATHS PER YEAR

FOREIGN BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION : 

CPR 61 FOREIGN BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION CAUSES: MOST COMMON CAUSE IN UNCONSCIOUS VICTIM IS TONGUE OR EPIGLOTTIS CHOKDING USUALLY OCCURS WHILE EATING WITH MEAT BEING THE MOST COMMON CAUSE CONTRIBUTING FACTORS: LARGE OR POORLY CHEWED PIECES OF FOOD ELEVATED BLLOD ALCOHOL LEVELS DENTURE OTHER FOREIGN OBJECTS PLAYING, CRYING, LAUGHING, OR TALKING WHILE FOOD OR FOREIGN BODIES ARE IN THE MOUTH (ESPECIALLY IN CHILDREN)

FOREIGN BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION : 

CPR 62 FOREIGN BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION PREVENTION: CUT FOOD INTO SMALL PIECES AND CHEW SLOWLY AND THOROUGHLY, ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE DENTURES AVOID EXCESSIVE INTAKE OF ALCOHOL AVOID LAUGHING OR TALKING WHILE CHEWING OR SWALLOWING PREVENT CHILDREN FROM PLAYING, WALKING, OR RUNNING WITH FOOD OR OTHER OBJECTS IN THEIR MOUTHS KEEP SMALL FOREIGN OBJECTS (I.E. MARBLES, BEADS, OR THUMBTACKS) AWAY FROM INFANTS AND SMALL CHILDREN. TAKE HEED TO WARNINGS ON TOY LABELS

RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION : 

CPR 63 RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION RECOGNITION OF FBAO IS THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT DISTINGUISHING FORM FAINTING, STROKE, HEART ATTACK, DRUG OVERDOSE, OR OTHER CONDITIONS THAT SAUXE RESPIRATORY ARREST IS VITAL DUR TO THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF MANAGEMENT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION DUE TO SWELLING IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY AND TIME SHOULDNOT BE WASTED ON ATTEMPTING TO RELIEVE THE OBSTRUCTED AIRWAY

RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION : 

CPR 64 RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION DEGREES OF AIRWAY OBSTRUCTIONS PARTIAL OBSTRUCTION GOOD AIR EXCHANGE: FORCEFUL COUGH, WHEEZING, TALKING DO NOT INTERFERE POOR AIR EXCHANGE: WEAK INEFFECTIVE COUGH, HIGH PITCHED BREATH SOUNDS, CYANOTIC, CLUTCHES THROAT (UNIVERSAL DISTRESS SIGNAL) MANAGE AS COMPLETE OBSTRUCTION

RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION : 

CPR 65 RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION DEGREES OF AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION COMPLETE OBSTRUCTION UNABLE TO SPEAK, BREATH, OR COUGH CLUTCHES NECK (UNVERSAL DISTRESS SIGNAL) CYANOTIC (BLUISH COLOR)

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT : 

CPR 66 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT INCIDENCE, CAUSES, PREVENTION, AND RECOGNITION

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT : 

CPR 67 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CPR training for pediatrics needs to be a community wide effort ranging from prevention to postresuscitation Pediatric out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest usually occurs while under the supervision of parents or surrogates

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT : 

CPR 68 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT Epidemiology: Sudden, primary cardiac arrest in uncommon, usually brought on by respiratory arrest. Pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest usually occurs in opposite ends of the age spectrum - less than one or in adolescence. Most common causes during infancy are intentional or unintentional injury, apparent life-threatening events (SIDS), respiratory diseases, airway obstruction, submersion, sepsis, and neurological diseases. After infancy, injuries are the leading cause.

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT INCIDENCE : 

CPR 69 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT INCIDENCE Injury is the leading cause of death in children and young adults and is responsible for more deaths than all other causes Six most common causes of injuries: Motor vehicle accidents Bicycle accidents Pedestrian accidents Submersion Burns Firearm accidents

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CAUSES AND PREVENTION : 

CPR 70 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CAUSES AND PREVENTION Motor vehicle injuries related trauma accounts for nearly half of all pediatric injuries and deaths Prevention? Pedestrian injuries Leading cause of death among children ages 5 to 9 years Prevention? Bicycle injuries Approximately 200,000 children and adolescents injured yearly Prevention?

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CAUSES AND PREVENTION : 

CPR 71 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CAUSES AND PREVENTION Submersion Drowning is a significant cause of death and disability in children under 4 years Prevention? Burns Approximately 80% of fire and burn-related deaths result from house fires (usually homes without working smoke detectors) Prevention?

PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CAUSES AND PREVENTION : 

CPR 72 PEDIATRIC BASIC LIFE SUPPORT CAUSES AND PREVENTION Firearm injuries Firearm homicide is the leading cause of death among African-American adolescents and young adults. Second leading cause of death among all adolescent males Prevention?

AUTOMATED EXTERNAL DIFIBRILLATOR : 

CPR 73 AUTOMATED EXTERNAL DIFIBRILLATOR DEFIBRILLATION IS THE MOST IMPORTANT BLS OR ALS INTERVENTION 1/2 MIL PEOPLE DIE SUDDENLY/YEAR FROM HEART ATTACKS 2/3 OF THOSE OUT-SIDE THE HOSPITAL ARRHYTHMIA’S CAUSE 60-80% ABNORMAL ELECTRICAL IMPULSE’S V-FIB IS MOST COMMON

HEART’S ELECTRICAL SYSTEM : 

CPR 74 HEART’S ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DISPLAYED BY AN EKG PACEMAKER THE SA NODE (GROUP OF CELLS) CAUSES THE HEART TO BEAT NORMAL RATES ADULT 60-100 CHILD 80-130 INFANT 80-160

CARDIAC ARREST : 

CPR 75 CARDIAC ARREST SA NODE MAY STOP FIRING CAUSES HEART ATTACK, ELECTROCUTION, DRUG OVERDOSE, DROWNING OTHER CELLS TRY UNSUCCESSFULLY TO TAKE OVER SAUSING RAPID UNCOORDINATED HEART ACTION V-TACK, WHICH DETERIORATES TO V-FIB THEN ASYSTOLE (NO ACTION), WITHIN 5-10 MIN

ACTION : 

CPR 76 ACTION AN AED WILL SHOCK V-TACK AND V-FIB ONLY SHOCK (POWERFUL ELECTRIC IMPULSES) THAT PARALYZES HEART CELLS TO STOP ABNORMAL ARRYTHMIA’S ALLOWING SA NODE TO TAKE OVER AGAIN CPR IN CARDIAC ARREST PROLONGS V-FIB SO A DEFIBRILLATOR CAN BE USED

AED USE : 

CPR 77 AED USE USE ONLY WHEN VICTIM IS PULSELESS NON-BREATHING UNCONSCIOUS AGE OVER 12 OVER 90 LBS

AED USE : 

CPR 78 AED USE CHECK BATTERIES PAD PLACEMENT UPPER Rt, LOWER Lt ENSURE STILLNESS (STOP CPR) PRESS ANALYZE - AED READS EKG IF V-TACK OR V-FIB DETECTED SHOCK IS ADVISED AT MEDIAL PROTOCAL 3 SET OF 3 SHOCKS SEPERATED BY 1 MIN OF CPR

AED PRECAUTIONS : 

CPR 79 AED PRECAUTIONS ENSURE DRY ENVIRONMENT KEEP CLEAR WHEN ASSESSING, CHARGING FIVE “ALL CLEAR” WHEN SHOCKING AVOID PACEMAKER IMPLANTS NITRO PATCHES QUESTIONS

BARRIER DEVICES FOR MOUTH TO MOUTH : 

CPR 80 BARRIER DEVICES FOR MOUTH TO MOUTH Several studies confirm that there is a risk of transmission of pathogens (disease) during exposure to blood, saliva, and other body fluids. Several devices have been developed to minimize such risks to the rescuer. Plastic face shield Silicone face shield mask with or without one-way valves

RISK FACTORSDISEASE TRANSMISSION : 

CPR 81 RISK FACTORSDISEASE TRANSMISSION OF THE ESTIMATED 40 MIL IN THE U.S. AND PERHAPS 150 MIL WORLDWIDE THAT HAVE BEEN TAUGHT MOUTH-TO-MOUTH RESCUE BREATHING ON MANNEQUINS IN THE LAST 25 YEARS, THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A DOCUMENTED CASE OF TRANSMISSION OF BACTERIAL, FUNGAL OR VIRAL DISEASE BY A CPR TRAINING MANNEQUIN.

ADULT ONE-RESCUER CPR : 

CPR 82 ADULT ONE-RESCUER CPR 1. Establish unresponsiveness.Activate the EMS system. 2. Open airway (head tilt-chin lift or jaw thrust).Check breathing (look, listen, fee).* 3. Give 2 slow breaths (1 1/2 to 2 seconds per breath),watch chest rise, allow for exhalation between breaths. 4. Check carotid pulse.If breathing is absent but pulse is present, provide rescue breathing (1 breath every 5 seconds, about 12 breaths per min) 5. If no pulse, give cycles of 15 chest compressions (rate, 80 to 100 compressions per minute) followed by 2 slow breaths. 6. After 4 cycles of 15:2 (about 1 minute), check pulse.* If no pulse, continue 15:2 cycle beginning with chest compressions. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

ADULT TWO-RESCUER CPR : 

CPR 83 ADULT TWO-RESCUER CPR 1. Establish unresponsiveness.EMS System has been activated. RESCUER 1 2. Open airway (head tilt-chin lift or jaw thrust).Check breathing (look, listen, feel).* 3. Give 2 slow breaths (1 1/2 to 2 seconds per breath), watch chest rise, allow for exhalation between breaths. 4. Check carotid pulse. RESCUER 2 5. If no pulse, give cycles of 5 chest compressions (rate, 80 to 100 compressions per minute) followed by 1 slow breath by Rescuer 1. 6. After 1 minute of rescue support, check pulse.* If no pulse, continue 5:1 cycles. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

ADULT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - CONSCIOUS : 

CPR 84 ADULT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - CONSCIOUS 1. Ask “Are you choking?” 2. Give abdominal thrusts (chest thrusts for pregnant or obese victim). 3. Repeat thrusts until effective or victim becomes unconscious. VICTIM BECOMES UNCONSCIOUS 4. Activate the EMS system. 5. Perform a tongue-jaw lift followed by a finger sweep to remove the object. 6. Open airway and try to ventilate; if still obstructed, reposition head and try to ventilate again. 7. Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts. 8. Repeat steps 5 through 7 until effective.* * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

ADULT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - UNCONSCIOUS : 

CPR 85 ADULT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - UNCONSCIOUS 1. Establish unresponsiveness.Activate the EMS system. 2. Open airway and try to ventilate; if still obstructed, reposition head and try to ventilate again. 3. Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts. 4. Perform a tongue-jaw lift followed by a finger sweep to remove the object. 5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until effective.* * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

CHILD ONE-RESCUER CPR : 

CPR 86 CHILD ONE-RESCUER CPR 1. Establish unresponsiveness.If second rescuer is available, have him or her activate the EMS system. 2. Open airway (head tilt-chin lift or jaw thrust).Check breathing (look, listen, feel).* 3. Give 2 slow breaths (1 to 1 1/2 seconds per breath),watch chest rise, allow for exhalation between breaths. 4. Check carotid pulse.If breathing is absent but pulse is present, provide rescue breathing (1 breath every 3 seconds, about 20 breaths per min) 5. If no pulse, give cycles of 5 chest compressions (100 compressions per min) followed by 1 slow breath. Repeat this cycle. 6. After about 1 min of rescue support, check pulse.* If rescuer is alone, activate the EMS system. If no pulse, continue 5:1 cycles. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

CHILD FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - CONSCIOUS : 

CPR 87 CHILD FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - CONSCIOUS 1. Ask “Are you choking?” 2. Give abdominal thrusts. 3. Repeat thrusts until effective or victim becomes unconscious. VICTIM BECOMES UNCONSCIOUS 4. If second rescuer is available, have him or her activate the EMS system. 5. Perform a tongue-jaw lift, and if you see the object, perform a finger sweep to remove it. 6. Open airway and try to ventilate; if still obstructed, reposition head and try to ventilate again. 7. Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts. 8. Repeat steps 5 through 7 until effective.* 9. If airway obstruction is not relieved after about 1 min, activate EMS system. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

CHILD FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - UNCONSCIOUS : 

CPR 88 CHILD FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - UNCONSCIOUS 1. Establish unresponsiveness. If second rescuer is available, have him or her activate the EMS system. 2. Open airway and try to ventilate; if still obstructed, reposition head and try to ventilate again. 3. Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts. 4. Perform a tongue-jaw lift, and if you see the object, perform a finger sweep to remove it. 5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until effective.* 6. If airway obstruction is not relieved after about 1 min, activate EMS system. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position

INFANT ONE-RESCUER CPR : 

CPR 89 INFANT ONE-RESCUER CPR 1. Establish unresponsiveness.If second rescuer is available, have him or her activate the EMS system. 2. Open airway (head tilt-chin lift or jaw thrust).Check breathing (look, listen, feel).* 3. Give 2 slow breaths (1 to 1 1/2 seconds per breath),watch chest rise, allow for exhalation between breaths. 4. Check brachial pulse.If breathing is absent but pulse is present, provide rescue breathing (1 breath every 3 seconds, about 20 breaths per min) 5. If no pulse, give cycles of 5 chest compressions (rate, at least 100 compressions per min) followed by 1 slow breath. Repeat this cycle. 6. After about 1 min of rescue support, check pulse.* If rescuer is alone, activate the EMS system. If no pulse, continue 5:1 cycles. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

INFANT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - CONSCIOUS : 

CPR 90 INFANT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - CONSCIOUS 1. Confirm complete airway obstruction.Check for serious breathing difficulty, ineffective cough, no strong cry. 2. Give up to 5 back blows and 5 chest thrusts. 3. Repeat step 2 until effective or victim becomes unconscious. VICTIM BECOMES UNCONSCIOUS 4. If second rescuer is available, have him or her activate the EMS system. 5. Perform a tongue-jaw lift, and if you see the object, perform a finger sweep to remove it. 6. Open airway and try to ventilate; if still obstructed, reposition head and try to ventilate again. 7. Give up to 5 back blows and 5 chest thrusts. 8. Repeat steps 5 through 7 until effective.* 9. If airway obstruction is not relieved after about 1 min, activate EMS system. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

INFANT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - UNCONSCIOUS : 

CPR 91 INFANT FOREIGN-BODY AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION - UNCONSCIOUS 1. Establish unresponsiveness. If second rescuer is available, have him or her activate the EMS system. 2. Open airway and try to ventilate; if still obstructed, reposition head and try to ventilate again. 3. Give up to 5 back blows and 5 chest thrusts. 4. Perform a tongue-jaw lift, and if you see the object, perform a finger sweep to remove it. 5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until effective.* 6. If airway obstruction is not relieved after about 1 min, activate EMS system. * If victim is breathing or resumes effective breathing, place in recovery position.

Slide 92: 

CPR 92 REVIEW

REVIEW : 

CPR 93 REVIEW WHAT IS THE CHAIN OF SURVIVAL? WHAT ARE THE RATIOS OF COMPRESSIONS TO VENTILATIONS FOR AN INFANT, CHILD, & ADULT? DURING CPR HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU CHECK FOR A PULSE? WHAT CAUSES GASTRIC DISTENTION?

REVIEW : 

CPR 94 REVIEW WHAT METHOD IS PREFERRED FOR OPENING THE AIRWAY? WHERE DO YOU CHECK FOR A PUSLE ON AN INFANT, CHILD, & ADULT? HOW OFTEN SHOULD YOU BREATH FOR A CHILD WITH A PULSE?

REVIEW : 

CPR 95 REVIEW WHAT IS THE FIRST THING YOU SHOULD DO IF A PULSE IS NOT PRESENT ON A CHILD? WHAT IS THE AGE GUIDELINES FOR INFANT, CHILD, & ADLUTS FOR CPR? WHAT IS THE “GOOD SAMARITAN” LAW?