INTRODUCTION

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INTRODUCTION :

INTRODUCTION In India pulses are grown in an area of 22-23 million hectares with annual production of 13-15 million tones but it is not sufficient to meet the domestic need of the country .As a result country is importing 2.9 million tonnes from other countries , so there is a immediate need of increasing our pulse production.

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTION :

STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTION availability of quality seeds Non availability of quality seeds in adequate quantity is one of the major constraints in pulse production . Increasing seed replacement rate from 4% to 10%. Production of quality seeds from 40000 mt to100000 mt.

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Effective formulation and implementation of 5-year seed rolling plan . Distribution of seeds improved varities through minikit programme. Seed village scheme with provision of contractual obligation

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INTEGRATED NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT In recent years , wide spread deficiency of Sulphur and zinc has been noticed in 44 districts of pulse growing regions . About 40% pulse growing regions have low to medium population of native rhizobium. Seed inoculation with biofertilizer can increase pulse productivity by 10-12%.

STRATEGIES:

STRATEGIES Ensuring availability and use of sulphur and zinc in deficient districts Ensuring timely availability of quality rhizobium and PSB cultures in adequate quantity. Providing incentive to farmers for using zinc and sulphur Frontline demonstrations on use of biofertlizers.

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER:

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Transfer of improved pulse production technologies remains the most neglected component in the past, Aggressive transfer of production technologies through frontline demonstrations and block demonstrations involving SDA, KVK, NGO and private sectors.

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Dissemination of knowledge on improved technologies . Massive programme on mass media , printed literature in vernacular languages. Special training programme for farmers, extension workers should be given.

FARM IMPLEMENTS:

FARM IMPLEMENTS poor drainage during rainy season causes heavy losses to pigeon pea on account of low plant stand and increased incidence of phytopthora particularly in the states of U.P, BIHAR, W.B, chattisgarh, mp and jarkhand. ridge planting has been found very effective in ensuring optimal plant stand and yield.

STRATEGIES TO AREA EXPANSION :

STRATEGIES TO AREA EXPANSION diversification of rice-wheat production system in states of punjab , haryana , uttar pradesh through chick pea and early pigeon pea . Popularization of pulses in intercropping systems. Replacing less remunerative cereals by pulses in targeted regions.

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Bringing focussed pulse crops under insurance cover with low premium Creation of storage facility at domestic/rural level. Effective marketing interventions. Extending liberal credit facilities to pulse growers.

IRRIGATION:

IRRIGATION Only 16% of total pulses growing area is under irrigation consequently pulses face severe moisture stress. Productivity can be enhanced by providing life saving irrigations for the crops which are being growned in rainfed condition.

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Strategies Distribution of sprinkler sets with package incentive in the targeted districts.

INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT:

INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT On an average 20-40%crop is annually lost due to damage caused by pod borers in pigeon pea and chick pea . Pod fly causes 10-15% loss in north India. Wilt and root rot cause heavy loss to pigeon pea and chickpea.

STRATEGIES:

STRATEGIES extending IPM umbrella against pod borer in pigeon pea and chick pea . Popularization of seed treatment with trichoderma sp against wilt and root rot . Conducting IPM demonstration on chickpea and pigeon pea against key insect pests and diseases.

POST HARVEST MANAGEMENT:

POST HARVEST MANAGEMENT pulses suffer heavy losses due to storage pests. further, there are no small processing units to convert grains into dal. this make farmer to dispose there produce immediately after harvest at low price .

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Strategies Popularization of IIPR dal mills Popularization and distribution of metal storage bins.

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Imports of Pulses by India (2005-2006 to 2008-2009) (Quantity : '000 Tonne; Value : Rs. In Crore; Unit Value : Rs. Per kg.) Item 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 Qty. Value Unit Value Qty. Value Unit Value Qty. Value Unit Value Peas and Beans 810.07 810.54 10.01 1388.58 1625.15 11.7 1738.28 2774.36 15.96 Chickpeas 281.76 535.52 19.01 127.32 356.31 27.99 145.61 337.39 23.17 Beans of the Spp Vinga Mungo 75 172.99 23.07 332.41 1055.58 31.76 326.57 856.46 26.23 Small Red Beans 13.4 24.14 18.01 11.82 26.35 22.29 0.72 1.51 20.97 Kidney Beans 42.02 82.79 19.7 56.63 164.99 29.13 42.09 125.82 29.89 Guarseed 0.18 0.26 14.44 - - - - - - Other Beans 173.52 316.41 18.23 219.66 668.91 30.45 116.78 274.62 23.51 Lentils 36.11 68.49 18.97 58.94 106.06 17.99 230.56 503.7 21.85 Broad Beans - - 0 - - 0 - - 0 Gram Excl Split - - 0 - - 0 - - 0 Gram Split - - 0 - - 0 - - 0 Moong - - 0 - - 0 - - 0 Tur 228.84 362.48 15.84 246.53 416.3 16.89 312.75 684.01 21.87 Urad - - 0 - - 0 - - - Others 209.14 420.08 20.09 48.75 141.17 28.96 33.96 84.64 24.92 Total 1870.04 2793.7 14.94 2490.64 4560.82 18.31 2947.32 5642.51 19.14 Total (Excluding other beans) 1696.52 2477.29 14.6 2270.98 3891.91 17.14 2830.53 5367.89 18.96